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Student Service 
On Sunday 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



See Page 4 For 
Quittie Staff 



VOL. X 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, JANUARY 11, 1934 



No. 18 



Green Blotter Club 
Holds Interesting 
Meet with Guests 

ORIGINAL WORKS GIVEN 

palatini Short Story, Yake Charac- 
ter Sketch Attract Atten- 
tion Of Club 



Green Blotter Club held its first meet- 
ing of the New Year on Wednesday eve- 
ning, January 3, at the home of Dr. 
Struble. The guests of the club for the 
evening were Dr. and Mrs. Wallace. 

President Martha Kreider opened the 
meeting by welcoming the guests, and 
the usual reading of papers by members 
of the club followed. An essay on prog- 
ress was presented by Adam Bigler in 
which he colorfully portrayed the pano- 
rama of the construction of a huge dam 
from the viewpoint of one of the work- 
ers on the project. Mr. Bigler was suc- 
cessful in creating an effect of the pon- 
derous proportions and spirit of his sub- 
ject. There followed a short discussion 
in which different manners of fixing the 
tone of the essay were suggested. 

Maxine Earley next read her descrip- 
tion of "Green Blotter Heaven" in 
which each upper class "inkspot" found 
himself placed in very unusual circum- 
stances. Miss Earley was questioned as 
to whether she had properly classified 
the place she was describing. 

Louis Straub next presented a humor- 
ous parody on "Hiawatha" which was 
concerned with a sad adventure of a 
village dandy of the gay nineties vin- 
tage. 

At this point, because of a pressing 
engagement, Dr. and Mrs. Wallace ter- 
minated their short visit to the club. 

A character sketch, continued from 
a previous meeting, was then given by 
David Yake. This sketch attempted to 
picture an eccentric carpenter by re- 
counting the thoughts the carpenter jot- 
ted down on paper from time to time. 
An entailed discussion ensued in which 
the matter of whether the plan of the 
sketch was a good one or whether it 
would become so involved as to obscure 
lts point was discussed. 

An interesting short story by Henry 
Palatini was next read by Martha Krei- 
der. The story of a never-do-well son 
of a big city Jewish family was forcibly 
Presented, the ending being particularly 
good. 

Following this story, George Hiltner 
rea d a sketch which described a family 
^turning home from a happy Christ- 
mas da V ar »d facing death on the high- 
Way thr °ugh an auto accident. The sub- 

of k WaS 3 gOOC * one an< ^ vaf i° u s means 
wringing out the dramatic possibili- 
( Continued on Page 4, Column 1) 



Examinations Cause 

Strange Interlude 

Exams spell an intensely disagreeable 
period of college life, and especially so 
after the lengthy Christmas holidays — 
two weeks of the life of Reilly, Christ- 
mas trees, turkey, candy, old friends, 
home, and gifts. Then, to return to the 
routine of class schedules, evenings of 
study (?) professors, lectures, and the 
usual student faces, only to be welcomed 
by an exam schedule staring one in the 
face. Probably many noble new year's 
resolutions were made concerning these 
examinations — many planned to burn 
the midnight oil while others snapped 
their fingers in derision (these, however, 
were few and far between) . 

It is an unusual and pleasing experi- 
ence to stroll across the campus during 
exam week late at night or early in the 
morning, and see many signs of active 
life within the dormitories — in the form 
of lights and moving figures. 

Exams, cramming, worried looks on 
the faces of the conscientious students, 
and then — after a week and a half of 
tired brains and writer's cramp — faces 
wreathed in smiles, freedom again until 
next June. 



Awards Discussed 
By Professors and 
Eligible Students 

ECONOMY IS OBJECTIVE 



Mowrey and Hitz 

To Talk in Church 

A new feature is to be given a trial 
year— a college night at the col- 
ar 86 chur ch. Sunday evening, Janu- 

y 4, the students will have entire 

ar ge of the church service. The 
^anning and execution of the pro- 

^ ls m the care of the students. 
m u • program will contain several 

quJ, numb ers, including the male 
quartet nnA 

Sh 0rt 1U lnstrumenta l number. 

Mowrev f 1 } be givCn ^ Kathryn 

If 1 MelWn Hitz - 

dent Lrvi 86 ^ 06 " successful > a stu " 
ev ent CC may become an annual 



One-Act Play Given 
By L. V. Dramatists 

LEHMAN AND NYE STAR 



Cast Under Buzzell's Direction Pre. 
sents "Bishop's Candlesticks" 
To Appreciative Audience 



"The Bishop's Candlesticks," a one- 
act play by Norman McKinnel, was the 
special feature of the January meeting 
of the dramatic club held Tuesday eve- 
ning in the Engle Conservatory. An 
audience of approximately one hundred 
and seventy-five college students, high 
school pupils, and friends gathered to 
witness the play, staged and directed en- 
tirely by student members of the dra- 
matic club. 

The story of the play is founded upon 
an incident in Victor Hugo's great work, 
"Les Miserables." The main action cen- 
ters upon an escaped convict, who, flee- 
ing justice and facing starvation, comes 
upon the bishop's house, and demands 
food, while threatening the bishop with 
a knife. The bishop calls his widowed 
sister and she sets out some food for the 
convict who eats it most ravenously. 
Meanwhile, the bishop engages him in 
conversation about his past career, draw- 
ing from him the confession of his early 
circumstances and the stealing he was 
forced to do. The bishop succeeds in 
arousing a response in the convict and 
makes him promise to spend the night 
on the couch in his room. The bishop 
having retired just a minute before, the 
convict seizes the valued candlesticks of 
the bishop and makes off with them. 
The theft is soon discovered and the 
thief returned. However, the bishop re- 
fuses to press any charge against him 
and he is released. Upon leaving, the 
bishop even forces the convict to take 
the candlesticks along, saying that they 
will be more useful to him. The curtain 
closes as the bishop kneels before his 
cross of prayer. 

As the bishop, Fred Lehman did an 
admirable bit of acting which entirely 
offset the disadvantages of too much 
make-up. His consistency in the matter 
of stage movement and speeches, as 
well, showed diligent preparation. 
(Continued on Page 4, Column 1) 



Expense of Over #500 May 
Eliminated By Action Of 
Students 



Be 



All Seniors eligible for awards recent- 
ly met with the faculty members of the 
student finance committee for the pur- 
pose of discussing the advisability of 
discontinuing the present system of 
awards. 

The meeting was in charge of Presi- 
dent C. A. Lynch who explained the 
purpose of the meeting and set forth the 
views of the faculty and administration 
upon this topic. He said that, in the 
light of the present economic situation, 
it had been decided to abandon the giv- 
ing of awards next year. This expense 
amounts to about $550 to $600, which 
sum could easily be used to advantage 
elsewhere. Furthermore, it was thought 
that, with this lessening of expense, the 
matriculation fee could be sizeably re- 
duced for the next year. It was his plea 
that the seniors voluntarily give up their 
awards for this year and return that 
money to the student body either by ac- 
tual refund, or by expenditure for some 
social activities. 

In tke course of the discussion it was 
pointed out that some seniors already 
have their pins and that this would be 
unfair to the others. Another student 
objected to the diversity of awards, not- 
ing that some cost as little as $4.00, 
whereas others cost $18.00, and he there- 
fore suggested standardization as a 
means of cutting expense. Some seniors 
demurred at the idea of returning the 
money to the students individually and 
proposed that it be set aside for some 
definite purpose. This was finally ar- 
rived at as the concensus of opinion. 

Dr. Lynch thanked the seniors for 
their hearty cooperation and said he 
would be glad to offer this report to the 
faculty at their earliest convenience. The 
disposal of the fund is now up to the 
faculty and their committees who are ex- 
pected to act in accordance with the 
student wishes. 



Interior of Campus 

Building Renovated 



An extensive renovation of the Ad- 
ministration building is in progress at 
the present time. A force of plasterers 
is engaged in applying new plaster to 
the walls and ceilings wherever it is 
needed, while an even larger group of 
painters is engaged in giving the rooms 
and hallways two coats of buff paint, 
with varnish on the woodwork. This 
program of renovation was begun the 
day after Christmas, and will not be fin- 
ished until the entire building is redeco- 
rated. It is thought that this process 
will take at least three or four more 
weeks. 

Causing some inconvenience, as might 
be generally expected, in forcing a 
change in the lecture room for some 
classes, nevertheless, the renovating is a 
very worthwhile improvement and is 
heartily welcomed by the students. It 
can certainly be said that the interior of 
the Administration building has never 
looked any finer than it will when this 
new project is completed. 



Lebanon Country 
Club is Scene of 
Sophomore Dance 

JIM DE ANGELIS PLAYS 

Bad Weather Does Not Keep 
Guests From Gaily-Deco- 
rated Club House 



The annual Sophomore Hop was suc- 
cessfully held last Friday evening in the 
ballroom of the Lebanon Country Club. 
Although small, the place proved to be 
a delightful one, and is now sure to be 
the scene of further college dances. The 
floor was attractively decorated with blue 
and white streamers and school pen- 
nants. A large '36 was placed on the 
wall opposite the entrance that the hosts 
might not be forgotten. 

And There Were" Many Accordians 

Another innovation was Jimmie de 
Angelis' orchestra. The band was ac- 
companied by two accordianists famed 
for their clever arrangements. The pro- 
gram wa s filled with a great variety of 

(Continued on Page 3, Column 1) 



Dr. Henry G. Hodges 
Lectures in Chapel 

DESCRIBES NAZI GERMANY 



Brands American Newspaper Ac- 
counts As Biased — Tells Of 
German Experiences 



Dr. Henry G. Hodges, an eminent 
authority upon contemporary conditions 
in Germany, gave a most interesting lec 
ture in chapel on Thursday, January 4 
As was stated in the introduction by 
Professor Stevenson, his talk and view 
point were unique, for "he has no axe 
to grind." 

To the majority of the students and 
professors, he seemed well disposed to 
ward the Nazi party, considering its 
viewpoints mainly. For example, con 
cerning the alleged atrocities committed 
upon the Jews, he cited the Nazis' fear 
that the Jews would rise so high in the 
professions that they would be enabled 
to seize the country and force the Ger- 
mans to leave. 

Lays Blame* on France 

According to his account, France, not 
Germany, is the bellicose nation and has 
caused innumerable frictions. Moreover, 
France deserves punishment for taking 
away Germany's lands after the war 
thus embittering the latter even to the 
point where she might wage war — "when 
she is prepared for a real war." 

He said that the German Lutheran 
Church cannot succeed because, in the 
first place, there are too many Catholics, 
and, moreover, the Lutheran ministers 
themselves are opposed to it. 

Compares Nazi — N.R.A. 

Dr. Hodges made a comparison be 
tween our N.R.A. and the Nazi dicta 
torship — Germany's plan is more likely 
to succeed than America's because the 
Germans are behind their government 
100 per cent, while we are only 40 per 
cent in support. Also, that Germany 
will go farther than either Russia or 
Italy because the Teutonic race is higher 
than either of the others, and the Nazi 
government is a product of evolution 
rather than revolution, which was not 
the case in the other two countries. 

His criticism of the American C. C. C. 
camps was interesting. He observed that 
the fellows are given mattresses of a 

(Continued on Page 2, Column 2) 



Suggestions Made 
By Conference May 
Affect Colleges 

PROF. WAGNER PRESENT 



Eligibility Standards May Be Raised 
To Regulate Pennsylvania 
College Athletics 



Representatives of thirty colleges and 
universities met in Harrisburg last Satur- 
day and adopted a tentative constitution 
for a proposed Pennsylvania Intercolle- 
giate Athletic Conference and also draft- 
ed a set of proposed regulations cover- 
ing athletic eligibility. Lebanon Valley 
was represented at the conference by 
Dr. Paul S. Wagner. 

The regulations and the constitution- 
will be presented to each of these col- 
leges for formal ratification or disap- 
proval by June 30, at which time every 
college willing to abide by the documents 
will become charter members of the new 
athletic conference. 

The meeting today was presided 
over by Parke R. Kolbe, president of 
Drexel Institute, and virtually all of the 
larger colleges in the State were repre- 
sented. 

Neil Car others, of Lehigh Univeisity, 
was chairman of the committee which 
drafted the nine proposed eligibility 
rules. LeRoy Mercer, of Penn, was also 
a member of this committee. 

1. Participants shall be carrying an 
ordinary roster of work as defense by 
the curriculum of the college. 

2. Residence as a bonafide student for 
one year shall be required, subject to ex- 
ceptions permitting freshmen participa- 
tion approved by two-thirds of the mem- 
bers upon application. 

3. Participation for three years is the 
maximum, subject to exceptions permit- 
ting four years in the case of colleges 
under Rule 2. 

4. Transfers shall be eligible after 
one year's residence for three years' par- 
ticipation in any sport, less the number 
of years of varsity participation in their 
sport before transfer. 

5. There shall be no athletic scholar- 
ships as defined by the Middle States 
Association. 

6. No student shall receive pay in any ( 
form for athletic proficiency. 

7. Every candidate shall present to 
his college a record of his athletic his- 
tory and misrepresentation of this record 
shall result in permanent ineligibility. 

8. Conference members shall ex- 
change lists of prospective competitors 
eligible in each sport. 

9. A varsity athlete wishing to play 
on any organized team outside his col- 
lege must obtain written permission in 
advance from his college. 



"Y" Cabinets Dined 
By Kind Professors 



Dr. and Mrs. G. G. Struble and 
Dr. and Mrs. A. H. Stonecipher en- 
tertained the Y. W. C. A. and Y. M. 
C. A. cabinets at dinner in the home 
of Dr. and Mrs. Stonecipher Wed- 
nesday evening, January 10. After 
enjoying a very savory dinner, the 
guests spent an entertaining evening 
playing games. The faculty advisers 
present included: Dr. and Mrs. 
Clyde A. Lynch, Dr. and Mrs. P. A. 
W. Wallace, Mrs. Mary C. Green, 
Dr. and Mrs. G. A. Richie. Dr. and 
Mrs. R. R. Butterwick, and Dr. Zeig- 
ler. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 11, 1934 



%a Vit Collegtemie 

ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Under 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



Prominent Campus Society Leaders 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Edmund Umberger, '34 .. .Editor-in-Chief 

Kathryn Mowrey, ':M Associate Editor 

Richard Schreiber, '34. .Managing Edit 
Richard Baus, '37 Asst. Man. Editor 

REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Martha Kreider, '34 
Allan Ranck, "34 
Elizabeth Schaak, '34 
Helen Earnest, '35 
Sylvia Evelev. '26 

David Yake, '36 General Reporters 

Christine Gruber. '34 Conservatory 

DeWitt Essick, '34 

George Hiltner, '35 Athletics 

Catherine Wagner, '35 Alumni 

Russell Aucott, '37 Art 

Clyde Mentzer, '34 Philokosmian 

Robert Cassel, '36 Kalozetean 

Jane Shellenberger, '36 Clionian 

Marietta Ossi, *35 Delphian 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Jack Todd, '34 Business Manager 

Kenneth Sheaffer, '35. Asst. Bus. Manager 
Allen Buzzell, '34. . .Circulation Manager 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 

Single Copies 5 cents 

Subscription fl-00 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter, under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



THURSDAY, JAN. 11, 1934 



WOMEN'S RIGHTS 



The days of suffragettes are not past. 
Here at Lebanon Valley, ripples of dis- 
content now and then disturb the placid 
flow of our existence. Voices question 
the regulations and customs which dic- 
tate, as custom can, the conduct of the 
young ladies, and the extent to which 
they indulge in campus activities. 

Strangely enough, little ado is made 
about the restrictions imposed by the 
W. S. G. A. — popularly known as the 
"Jigger Board." Possibly the co-eds feel 
that the opinions of older and wiser 
heads should be respected. The men are 
more vociferous in expressing opinions 
of a situation which, at most, concerns 
them only indirectly. 

The place of the co-ed in campus ac- 
tivities has risen immeasurably in the 
span of years covered by recorded his- 
tory at Lebanon Valley. Now the wom- 
en meet the men in journalistic, foren- 
sic, class, and other mutual activities at 
a level. But a consideration of the high 
standards of achievement in these en- 
deavors leads one to think that full ad- 
vantage is not taken of the ability dis- 
played by the fair sex. Perhaps the girls 
could do more, if they were not tautly 
barred from "high command," and were 
given a chance. 




ALLEN BUZZELL 
Who was elected president of the Kalo- 
zetean Literary Society for the winter 
term. He has been active" in society af- 
fairs for four years. 




DE WITT ESSICK 
Retiring president of Philokosmian 
Literary Society, who has been influen- 
tial in s.ociety activities during his col- 
lege career. 



Literary Societies Elect Officers 



The Philokosmian Literary Society 
met in a business session last Friday 
noon in Philo Hall. The purpose of the 
meeting was the election of officers to 
serve through the opening half of the 
second semester. Edmund H. Umberger 
was the choice of the Philos for the of- 
fice of president. The following were 
chosen to assist him: 

Vice president, William Gerber; cor- 
responding secretary, Richard Walborn; 
recording secretary, Lester Krone; cri- 
tic, Kenneth Sheaffer; chaplain, Louis 
Straub; executive chairman, George 
Hiltner; sergeants-at-arms, Kenneth 
Eastland, John Houtz, Robert Kell; pi- 
anist, Richard Slaybaugh. 



After other routine business was 
transacted, the meeting was adjourned 
to await the call of the president 



At a meeting held soon after the holi- 
days, the Kalozetean Literary Society 
elected George Klitch, prominent senior, 
to the office of anniversary president, 
and Allen Buzzell to the position of 
winter term president. The remaining 
offices were filled as follows: vice-presi- 
dent, Charles Furlong; recording secre- 
tary, Tony Jagnesak; corresponding sec- 
retary, Robert Sausser; chaplain, Mor- 
gan Edwards; critic, James Fridy; ser- 
geants-at-arms, Brosious, Reber, Walker. 



DR. HENRY G. HODGES 

LECTURES IN CHAPEL 



(Continued from Page One) 



SONG BOOKS 



The new song books, which have been 
in evidence in chapel for the last week, 
and which have been hugely enjoyed, if 
lustiness and fervor of singing are cri- 
teria, are another of the benefits brought 
to the college in general by conservatory 
groups. 

These books were bought with money 
earned by a small orchestra composed 
of conservatory and college students. 
The names of these students were read 
in chapel, and although it is doubtful 
that many heard, and few will remem- 
ber the books remain as a contribution 
to enrich the life of the school. 



good quality, and couldn't see how they 
deserve this luxury. 

Open Forum Held 
After his talk, which was immeasur- 
ably enjoyed both by the professors and 
students, an open forum discussion was 
held. Although it is not the usual cus- 
tom, and the audience for that reason 
was not very ready with questions, after 
the professors started the ball rolling, it 
proved to be quite interesting. On the 
whole, his interpretation of Germany's 
policies was quite educational and 
unique. 

Dr. Hodges is well prepared to speak 
upon Germany, for he spent eighteen 
months there in observing the condi- 
tions from a year before the revolution 
to six months after the dictatorship. He 
saw things as they were, and told the 
audience not to believe what they read 
concerning Germany, for practically all 
of it is garbled and partial. 

Is Well Known Scholar 

He is a graduate of Princeton and 
received his doctorate at the University 
of Pennsylvania, where he was Harrison 
Fellow in Political Science. Moreover, 
he is the author of "The Doctrine of 
Intervention," "Diplomatic Relations 
Between the United States and Great 
Britain" and numerous articles for 
American and German magazines. His 
latest book, not yet finished, is "Hitler's 
Germany." He was formerly a lecturer 
on International Relations for the Car- 
negie Foundation and at the University 
of Berlin on "Problems of American 
Cities"; also at Western Reserve Univer- 
sity, Cleveland, Ohio, on International 
Law and Government. Since return ; ng 
from Europe he has lectured for the 
Foreign Policy Association on the pres- 
ent German situation. 



Freshman Theme 



FIRST IMPRESSIONS OF 
COLLEGE 



There will be no issues of La Vie Col- 
legienne during the weeks of semester) 
examinations. 



May the lamps of friendship be light- 
ed by the oil of sincerity. 



Rah! Rah! Rah! Alley-ga-zoop, al- 
ley-ga-zoop. Team! Team! Team! Jost- 
ling throngs, packed stadiums, martial 
music, raccoon coats, upturned flasks, 
dainty damsels, stalwart seniors, and 
clashing, grinding, stampeding moun- 
tains of sinew and bone. (Four years of 
personal contact with these mastodons 
of brawn enabled me to determine that 
the sinew is located below the neck and 
the bone above). A tree-shaded campus, 
majestic buildings, be-goggled co-eds, 
grave upperclassmen, milling freshmen, 
bewhiskered professors, and observation 
balloons substituting for knickers. (The 
same four years qualified me to write a 
book called "Popular Fallacies of the 
American College"). Sweeping boule- 
vards lined with fraternity houses, week- 
end parties, anatomy revealing gowns, 
dazzling shirt fronts, soft music, gra- 
cious chaperones, lissom couples, refine- 
ment, and mayhap a little giggle-water. 
The above shows the trend of my flitting 
thoughts as I nonchalantly signed the 
college registration papers., Long had I 
thought about the day when I would be- 
come a collegiate chappie. At last, at 
last, at last! 

The first day and the descent from 
the clouds began. We were importuned 
to buy dinks, ties, and buttons. The 
dinks weren't bad, rather cocky in fact, 
but the ties. I, who had a particular 
weakness for spectrum-colored neckwear, 
was forced to wear a piece of felt, of 
funeral hue, which was popularily sus- 
pected of being a tie. Upon close in- 
spection they appeared to have been 
manufactured by one-armed antiqua- 
rians afflicted with palsy and a rigid 
sense of economy. The buttons, which 
were no more or less than a tag or label 
upon which one was supposed to write 
his name, were of the larger variety 
usually seen upon blind beggars. Rac- 



coon coats were known as "x", (the un- 
known quantity). The co-eds were not 
be-goggled and the upperclassmen had 
juvenile tendencies. They took a most 
unholy delight in roaring and making 
faces at the poor, frightened freshmen. 
They improvised childish games and 
with buccaneering uncouthness demand- 
ed the frosh participate. For the sake 
of two numerals, "36" and "37", the 
college handbook requ?sted the simper- 
ing sophs and the foolish frosh to beat 
each other's brains out with fence ports. 
Because of the casualties caused by the 
sophomores' using tree trunks, the sedat? 
seniors ordained that we discontinue this 
jousting and settle this inane dispute by 
fisticuffs. Among other activities decreed 
by the gods was a maypole dance and a 
tug-of-war. (S. S.'s versus the F. F.'s) . 
Alas and alack, my dream of having the 
professors arrayed in goatees and side 
whiskers was dashed to the ground and 
stamped upon. Their faces were as 
smooth as a toddling tot's. They, who 
were without dignity, conversed fluently 
and intelligently in slang. Surely I must 
be dreaming because of a pre-bedtime 
feast. Was this nightmare college life? 
I know that salami, pickled herring, and 
beer make me a trifle restve, but this! 
I remember once, after I had eaten lim- 
berger cheese and chocolate filberts, I 
dreamed of pink horses pulling a green 
locomotive. You might say, "Why didn't 
you pinch yourself to see if you were 
awake?" and I would answer, "I pinched 
myself so often and so hard that I was 
forced to attend classes on crutches." 
That pinching racket is the bunk. I was 
not dreaming. This was stark reality. 
Ah, woe is me, woe is me! (Will some- 
one please pour ashes on my head?) 

Of course I eventually became accli- 
mated to these conditions. I even found 
excuses for the professor's beardlessness. 
I resigned myself to the fact that there 
were no fraternities. I overlooked the 
absence of raccoon coats and even be- 
came temperate — occasionally. I found 
many things to admire in college and, 
after serious thought, I can truthfully 
say I prefer this type to the highly so- 
cialized college of my dreams.. 

—FRANK B. HUBER. 




Big christening in English 66 c las s i 
Henry Palatini now scintillates uncle 
the new title, Twinkle, twinkle little star! 
See Prof, for particulars. 



A certain sophomore girl tired { 
reading and hearing about the Gre etl 
Blotters' "ink-spots" suggests the club 
change its name to "The Beer Keg" ari( j 
that the members be called "Mugs." 



ALUMNI NOTES 



Announcement has been made of the 
engagement of Miss Elsa Feichtinger of 
Linz, Australia, and J. Calvin Keene, 
L. V., '30. Mr. Keene has, for the past 
three years, been teaching in the Ameri- 
can College in Smyrna, Turkey. The 
couple plan to be married there in the 
spring and to return to the United 
States in the early fall.. They will en- 
roll for graduate courses in Yale Uni- 
versity and will make their home in New 
Haven. 



Word has come concerning the ac- 
tivities of Mr. Elias Kline, '30. Mr. Kline 
taught English and history in the South 
Lebanon township high school, and later 
taught English at Narbeth, Pennsylva- 
nia. This year he is teaching in the 
Junior College of Juniata College at Al- 
toona. He is teaching English, educa- 
tion and history. Mr. Klin ehas nearly 
completed the work required for the doc- 
torate degree at the University of Penn- 
sylvania. 



Dr. O. Edgar Reynolds attended the 
annual meeting of the State Teachers 
Association which was held at Philadel- 
phia December 27-29, 1933. He also 
attended some of the sessions of the 
American Association of University 
Professors which were held at Philadel- 
phia during the same week. 



"What have you been doing all sum- 
mer?" 

"I had a position in my father's of- 
fice, and you?" 

"I wasn't working, either." 



"I h«>ar vou have an addition to your 
family, Mrs. Cat. Was it a boy or a 
mrl?" 

Oh, just six of one and half dozen of 
the other, my dear." 



Needy students feeling that the end is 
near offer the following articles for sale' 

1. One brand new (almost) gray nat 
— see Steffy. 

2. Several pints of cherry brandy—- 
The Three Musketeers. 

3. One faithful lover — slightly dam- 
aged. Write Box 44, c/o La Vie Coll e . 
gienne.. 

4. One "Gesundheit" and one Riefc. 
er's Bock sign.. May be seen in Room 8 
any Sunday morning between 2 and 4, 

5. One "poisonality." This is a guar- 
anteed article. See B. Ray Johnson of 
the Johnstown Johnsons. 

6. Four (4) perfectly good packs of 
"Camels." See lockers 22, 35 and 54 
(where? ) . 

7. One perfectly good book-report, 
Slightly used. See English major. 



Young man at hospital: May I please 
c ee the patient in room 36? 

Nurse: Sorry, sir, she's convalescing. 

Young Man: Well, she can stop for a 
while, can't she? 



"Why is Mrs. Wombat disappointed?" 
"She wrote for a Congressional Rec- 
ord." 

"Well?" 

"She thought it was something she 
could play on the phonograph." 



"How is it that you, who are so lucky 
at cards, always lose at horse racing?" 
"Because I can't shuffle the horses!" 



Granddaughter (being lectured) : "1 
seem to have heard that the girls of your 
period 'set their caps' for men." 

Grandmother: "Yes, but not their 
knee-caps." 



"Live here all your life?" 
"Don't know. Haven't died yet." 



The middle class is the one that is able 
to live in public as the rich do by living 
in private as the poor do. 



"Are you in favor of women taking 
part in public affairs?" 

"It's all right if you really want the 
affairs public." 



Daughter, having received a beaut^ 11 
set of mink skins from her father: "Wh at 
I don't see is how such wonderful ^ U | S 
can come from a low, sneaking ^ t£ ' 
beast." 

Father: "I don't ask for thanks, 
but I really do insist on respect." 



Sign on a Scotch golf course: ' ^ et!l 
bers will kindly refrain from picking u |j 
lost golf balls until they have stopP 
rolling." 



"Papa, what do you call a man 



dri 



rives a carr 



"It depends on how close he c0,IJ 



"I heard a new one the other day- 
wonder if I told it to you." 
"Is it funny?" 
"Yes." 

"The n you haven't." 



Him: "I almost kissed the P r 
girl in the world last night." ? n 
Another Him: "Why didn't J 
First Him: "My alarm went 
soon and I woke up." 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 11, 1934 



PAGE THREE 



CAMPUS CUTS 

— i — 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE BASKETBALL SQUAD 
STATISTICS— 1934 



Name 


Pos. 


Class 


Age 1 


Wt. 


Ht. 


School 


Arndt :.. 


- F 


'35 


21 


145 


5 6 


Annville High Schoo 


*Barthold 


_ F 


'35 


21 


160 


5 10 


Shillington H. S. 


Konsko 


G 


'35 


21 


157 


5 9 


Palmerton H. S. 


♦Light, Capt. 


G 


'34 


22 


158 


5 8 


F. 6C M. Academy 


Miller - 


G 


'35 


20 


165 


5 11 


Lebanon H. S. 


Patrizio - 


G 


'36 


21 


155 


5 10 


F. QC M. Academy 


*Rose 


C-G 


'35 


20 


190 


6 


Trenton, N. J., H. S. 


*Rust ... - 


F 


'35 


20 


155 


5 8 


Lansdowne H. S. 


B. Sponaugle 


G 


'36 


20 


185 


6 1 


Hershey H. S. 


C. Sponaugle 


__ G 


'36 


21 


185 


6 


Hershey H. S. 


* Williams 


F-G 


'34 


21 


165 


5 11 


Keystone Academy 


*Smith — 


L 


'35 


22 


185 


5 11 


Trenton, N. J., H. S. 



* Denotes Letterman. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 

1934 



January 10 — Lebanon Valley vs. Drexel Philadelphia 

January 13 — Lebanon Valley vs. Franklin-Marshall Lebanon 

January 17 — Lebanon Valley vs. Gettysburg Gettysburg 

January 20 — Lebanon Valley vs. Muhlenberg Allentown 

February 3 — Lebanon Valley vs. Ursinus Lebanon 

February 10 — Lebanon Valley vs. Gettysburg Lebanon 

February 14 — Lebanon Valley vs. Albright Reading 

*February 17 — Lebanon Valley vs. Dickinson Carlisle 

February 21 — Lebanon Valley vs. Franklin-Marshall Lancaster 

February 24 — Lebanon Valley vs. Drexel Lebanon 

March 3 — Lebanon Valley vs. Muhlenberg Lebanon 

March 7 — Lebanon Valley vs. Ursinus Collegeville 

March 10 — Lebanon Valley vs. Albright Lebanon 



* Not an Eastern Pennsylvania Collegiate Basketball League Game. 



SOPHOMORES DANCE AT 
LEBANON COUNTRY CLUB 

(Continued from Page One) 

the newest pieces in their own inimitable 
style. 

Although the weather was rainy Fri- 
day evening, this fact did not daunt 
those who planned to attend, nor even 
less did it dampen the ardor of the 
guests. A spirit of pleasure and enjoy- 
ment certainly prevailed. 



The members of the faculty who were 
guests of the Sophomores were Mrs. 
Green, Dr. and Mrs. Struble, and Dr. 
and Mrs. Stonecipher.. Numerous stu- 
dents from other neighboring colleges 
were also noted. 

Cunning Committee Connives 

For the convenience of those attend- 
ing, a bus of the Lebanon company was 
provided by the committee. This group, 
consisting of Richard Huber, Frederick 
Gruber, and Robert Cassel, deserve great 
credit for the success of the affair. 



With the advent of another year our 
worthy "chief" has resolved, yea, firmly 
resolved, to respect Martha as she has 
never before been respected. Realizing 
that this is probably her last year upon 
this terra cotta — or is it terra firma? — 
"Chief" ha s brought her as close to him- 
self as possible. . . . She now reposes 
(piecefully) beneath his window, ready 
at a moment's notice to snort into ac- 
tion. He still has the nerve to call her 
a Chevrolet but I advise that he doesn't 
let General Motors hear that boast. 

Also, Martha has been rechristened 
"Shasta." Shasta have this and shasta 
have that. Get it? Credit line goes to 
Wilson. 



The first medal of the new year goes 
to "Papoose" Buzzell for his hair-rais- 
ing Indian stories. . . . Second place is 
awarded to Rae Anna Reber, the moult- 
ing songster. . . . Far behind in third 
place comes Hauck's tux. (How does it 
feel to get back into ordinary street 
clothes, Charlie?) 

At the other end of the list come 
George Sherk, who got himself a swell 
headache trying to figure out how it is 
possible to give free pork and sauer kraut 

dinners to customers And "Rocking 

Chair" Kandrat, who has been busy since 
Monday with the problem of who makes 
her clothes. It must be her mother. Am 
I right, Pete? 

It wasn't so very long ago that Frank 
Bryan became confused. He left Leba- 
non for Annville and started to hop 
East. For a change he thought it would 
be better to go via Reading. . . . Some 
Lebanon Samaritan took pity on our 
hero and steered his tired feet in the 
right direction. . . . N. B. — He made 
his eight o'clock class with several min- 
utes to spare. 



How many of us realize that pi (not 
pie, you mohawker) can be carried out 
to forty places? "It certainly can and 
the figures are easily remembered," says 
a person on the campus. I'll take the 
pie. But I hope the kitchen force does- 
n't get hold of that idea. One pie goes 
to too many places now. 

QUESTION AND ANSWER 
DEPARTMENT 
(To appear rarely) 

You can get an answer to any an- 
swerable or unanswerable question (and 
how) by addressing THE OLD SAGE 
(with whiskers down to here), care of 
La Vie Collegienne, Annville, Pa. 



THE OLD SAGE: 

Although I am a young man, unfor- 
tunately my hair is somewhat thinned 
and baldness threatens, in spite of con- 
tinued treatments and my best efforts to 
avoid it. Already children taunt me 
about it and call me "baldy." This 
vexes me. 

What advice could you offer? 

Prof. 

DEAR PROFESSOR: 

Treatments are baloney. Don't believe 
the advertisements. Elisha had the same' 
trouble as you have. The Bible records 
his cure in II Kings, Chapter 2, verses 
23 to 25, inclusive. Believe me, that will 
fix the kids. If you have trouble getting 
the bears, why not fool 'em, — through 
our classified ad. column buy a modern 
non-skid wig, a thing of beauty and a 
joy forever. 

THE OLD SAGE. 



The soldier and sailor must leave his 
conscience at home and do as he is told, 
pledging his manhood to the service of 
hell. (from Setar.) 
Secrets with girls, like guns with boys, 
Are never valued until they make a 
noise. — Crabbe. 



Life's a jest, and all things show it; 
I thought so once and now I know it. 

— Gay. 



Conservatory Has 
Operetta Under Way 

CAST INCOMPLETE AS YET 

Gilbert-Sullivan "Trial By Jury" 
Will Appear Early In 
February 

Here is an announcement which many 
Lebanon Valley people have been eager- 
ly awaiting — at last an operetta is to be 
given on the campus. 

The conservatory class of English ac- 
tivities, taught by Dr. Wallace, is plan- 
ning to present, in the near future, the 
Gilbert and Sullivan operetta, "Trial by 
Jury." Although the date has not yet 
been definitely set, it will probably be 
the second Friday in February. 

Professor Crawford is in charge of the 
production, and is making the neces- 
sary changes in the score to fill the needs 
of the people with whom he is working. 
The idea of having the operetta is not 
only to give the students experience in 
acting, but also to train them in the 
production and management of an ope- 
retta. 

Although the cast has not been com- 
pletely filled, the following people will 
appear in the rendition: Charlotte Stab- 
ley, Dale Roth, Matilda Bonnani, Helen 
Summy, Catherine Heckman, Jane Show- 
ers, Rae Anna Reber, Nancy Bowman, 
Margaret Early. Besides these, there are 
still several major parts to be filled, and 
the members of choruses to be named. 

The public is cordially invited to at- 
tend the performance. There will be a 
very small charge for admission. 



Conference Tilts 

Are Now Under Way 

The Eastern Pennsylvania Collegiate 
Basketball Conference, of which Leba- 
non Valley is a member, opened its 
third season during the past week. 
Three of the teams, including the Blue 
and White, had not as yet opened their 
season when the league standing as com- 
piled below was made: 

With the opening games of the sea- 
son out of the way, Albright's Lions and 
Gettysburg Bullets are deadlocked for 
first place in the Eastern Pennsylvania 
Collegiate Conference race, each having 
scored one victory. 

Albright launched its campaign with 
an impressive 57 to 33 victory over the 
Ursinus Bears, while Gettysburg turned 
back Johnny Utz's Mules of Muhlenberg 
by a 35 to 22 score. 



East Penna. Collegiate Conference 





W. 


L. 


Pet. 


Albright 







f.OOO, 


Gettysburg 


1 





1.000 


Lebanon Valley 








.000 


Drexel — 








.000 


F. and M 








.OOOy 


Muhlenberg 





1 


.000 


Ursinus - — 





1 


.000 



This Week's Games 

Muhlenberg vs. F. and M., Lancaster; 
Lebanon Valley vs. Drexel, Philadelphia, 
on Friday; Drexel vs. Albright, Reading, 
Saturday; F. and M. vs. Lebanon Valley, 
Lebanon; Gettysburg vs. Ursinus, Col- 
legeville; Albright vs. Muhlenberg, Al- 
lentown. 



Wrestlers Narrowly 
Lose to York YMCA 



BEAVER AND HOUTZ WIN 



Matmen Put Up Good Showing 
In First Meet and Gain 
Experience 

Led by its coach, Curvin Thompson, 
the wrestling club was entertained in its 
first meet by a strong, well-organized 
Y. M. C. A. team of York, Pa., last 
Fridav evening before a crowd of three 
hundred spectators. Despite the fact 
that the home club is still in its in- 
fancy, it was able to emerge from the 
fray on the short end of a close 25-15 
score. One more fall gained by the 
locals would have brought about a tie 
score. 

Kong in Killing Mood 

The two most interesting matches of 
the evening were won by the collegians 
when Beaver outscrapped and outlasted 
Emig, an experienced and rarely-beaten 
opponent, and Houtz decisively whipped 
Horis, a former F. 8C M. star and pres- 
ent coach of the York team. The en- 
durance of Beaver and Houtz, both of 
whom had never wrestled in a meet be- 
fore, proved to be the winning factor 
over their more experienced rivals. Hor- 
is was no match for the local "King 
Kong" whose strength and surprising 
alacrity were just too much for him. 

Others of the squad showed up very 
well, although it was apparent that they 
were slightly nervous because of the fact 
that it was their first encounter. It is 
believed that the experience gained in 
this first rivalry, however, will prove valu- 
able in future meets, and the collegians 
are hoping that in their next encounter 
with the York team they will emerge vic- 
torious. 

In the 115 pound class, Gruber won 
by default from Custis. In the 125 
pound class Beaver pinned Emig, while 
Hershey, wrestling 135 pounds, was de- 
feated in a close match by Brown, pres- 
ent national weight-lifting champion. In 
the 145 pound class, Grumbacher, for- 
mer captain of the Mercersburg Acad- 
emy squad, defeated Fridy, and Myers 
defeated Messersmith in the 155 pound 
class. Straub dropped his match in the 
165 pound class to Rausch, and in a 
hard-fought contest, Masimer bowed to 
Chantiles in the 175 pound class. In 
the final grapple of the evening, Houtz, 
the collegiate heavyweight, easily de- 
feated Horis, "grunt and growl" artist 
of the York squad. 

Club Will Change Name 

In the two exhibition meets, Thomp- 
son lost to Blum of York on time ad- 
vantage, and Gruber was pinned by 
Custis, who defaulted because he was 
overweight, in a minute and twelve sec- 
onds. 

The wrestling club wishes to announce 
that in future encounters it will wrestle 
under the name of the "Collegians." 



Fan dancing is the loftiest, most mov- 
ing, and the most beautiful of the acts. 
Because it is no mere translation or ab- 
straction from life — it is life itself, it is 
the only act of which we ourselves are 
the stuff. 

— Havelock Ellis. 




IT COSTS BUT LITTLE 
To Telephone llvme! 

Most pleasures cost money — some too much. 
No wonder home folks say "go easy" to sons 
at college. 

But you'll never (well — hardly ever) hear 
that warning when you telephone home. For 
Father and Mother the pleasure of hearing 
your voice far outweighs the trifling cost. 

After 8:30 P. M. (if you use S alion to Sta- 
tion Service) you can telephone a hundred 
miles for 35 cents. What greater pleasure can 
such a small sum buy? A "voice visit" home 
is next best to being there ! 




PARENTS ENEIOItSE 
iliese SUGGESTIONS . , . 

Keep a regular telephone date with Home. 
Then you can count on the family being 
there when you (all. 

iet the "date" for after 8:30 P.M. to take 
idvantage of the low Night Rates on Sta- 
tion to Station rails. 

Just give the Operator your home telephone 
number. 
'.hargea may be reversed. 



THE BELL TELEPHONE COMPANY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

M-5 



I 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, 




RSDAY, JANUARY 11, 1934 



Editor Announces 
'36 Quittie Staff 



SHELLENBERGER ASSOCIATE 



Yake Will Call First Session 
Of Group In Near 
Future 

David Yake, editor of the 1936 Guit- 
tapahilla today announced the staff that 
will collaborate with him in producing 
the class annual. 

The following list comprises the edi- 
torial staff; Jane Shellenberger, associ- 
ate; Louise Gillan, Robert Cassel, June 
Gingrich, Lois Miller, Boyd Sponaugle, 
Iva Claire Weirick, Calvin Reber, Estelle 
Delgado, Sylvia Evelev, Samuel Harnish, 
Millard Schmuck, Vernon Hemperly 
The business staff will be appointed in 
the near future. 

Although the real work on the 1936 
Quittapahilla does not begin until next 
year, the appointment of a staff at this 
time will give each member ample time 
to get acquainted with the task that is 
before him. Editor Yake will call the 
first meeting of the group in the near 
future. 



DRAMATIC CLUB GIVES 

ABSORBING PRODUCTION 



(Continued from Page One) 



Acting is Consistent 

The same consistency was noted in 
the part of the bishop's sister, a widow, 
played by Mildred Nye. Her part called 
for a display of emotion which she ac- 
complished successfully throughout most 
of the play. Her work easily overshad- 
owed any minor fault that could possibly 
be mentioned. 

Mr. Magee, in his first large drama- 
tic role in college, did his part very 
favorably. Apparently nervous at the 
outset and giving a doubtful impression 
of his emotions under the circumstances, 
Mr. Magee warmed up to his role, and 
finished it quite successfully. The role 
was a difficult one, and he deserves to 
be complimented for the favorable at- 
tempt he made to put it across. 

As the maid, Mary Kauffman im- 
pressed the audience in her first appear- 
ance in college dramatics. A good, clear 
voice is one of her biggest assets. 

Lloyd Beamesderfer, also appearing 
for the first time in a college play, per- 
formed his brief duties as police officer 
very capably. 

Student is Director 

Much credit for the success of the play 
must go to the student director, Allen 
Buzzell, also the club president, who 
undertook this task and made a complete 
success of it. The smoothness with which 
the entire play moved forward was evi- 
dence of his competent direction. He 
was ably assisted by Miller Schmuck, in 
charge of properties; Lena Cockshott, 
in charge of costumes; Allan Ranck, 
stage manager, and George Sherk, busi- 
ness manager. 

At the conclusion of the play, regu- 
lar members of the club met for a busi- 
ness session, during which time a pro- 
gram for the next three meetings was 
outlined and adopted. Immediately af- 
j terwards, try-outs were begun for the 
Greek play, "Antigone," to be presented 
in February. 



GREEN BLOTTER CLUB 

DISCUSSES SUNDRIES 



(Continued from Page One) 



ties of the situation were suggested. 

The rest of the meeting was spent talk- 
ing over different problems and activi- 
ties of the club. Dates and plans for a 
proposed alumni meeting, what to do 
with the club's unfinished novel, and 
proposed rules governing attendance at 
meetings received the most attention. 

Mrs. Struble's delightfully different 
refreshments were then served and after 
a period of general conversation the 
club adjourned. 



MYLIN INDULGES 
IN CONFERENCES 



While everyone else was enjoying his 
Chr istmas vacation at home, Coach E. 
E. "Hooks" Mylin was attending con- 
ferences, in fact, three conferences. 
Coach Mylin journeyed to Chicago 
where he attended the following meet- 
ings: On December 26-27, the 13th an- 
nual meeting of the American Football 
Coaches' Association, held at the Hotel 
Sherman. On December 28-29, the 37th 
annual meeting of the College Physical 
Education Association, at the Hotel Ste- 
vens; and on December 29-30, the 
National Collegiate Athletic Association, 
also held at the Hotel Stevens. 



"A Rose is a Rose" 



One of the most outstanding books 
published this fall, and one which has 
drawn the most contradictory criticisms 
is the "Autobiography of Alice B. Tok- 
las." Who is Alice B. Toklas? — the 
first question that comes to mind. As 
everyone knows by now, this autobiog- 
raphy of her faithful secretary and com- 
panion was actually written by Gertrude 
Stein, a trick which permits Miss Tok- 
las to make some strikingly laudatory 
estimates. 

Now since we know this book to be an 
autobiography of Miss Stein, we can but 
admire the way in which she knows her- 
self, for the picture she presents of 
herself is very true. Throughout the 
account you feel the presence of a 
unique and vigorous person. There is 
a great regal egotism that is not at all 
offensive as one might expect. Upon 
the cover of the volume in a circlet are 
the words — "a rose is a rose is a rose is 
a rose". Miss Stein had this motto on 
top of her paper for a long time. It is 
a very good motto, and one that struck 
me at once, because though I have seen, 
and met, in my life, a great many roses, 
I knew very well that most of these roses 
of my experience had not been roses. It 
seems that most of the time a rose tries 
to be something else than a rose — and 
unfortunately succeeds only too well. The 
ambition of roses nowadays is to turn 
orchids or carnations or peonies, or 
anything, but very few roses indeed ad- 
mit that they are roses and stick to 
that. Miss Stein never cares to hide 
the fact she is a rose. 

In addition to receiving an excellent 
picture of the author, you see Paris — 
Paris from all sides. Pre-war Paris, the 
new Paris, the city of artists and writ- 
ers, the city that draws Americans. Then, 
too you have presented an account of 
the great struggle for new art which to- 
day has become so accepted. You meet 
artist's long before they had become fam- 
ous and you know of their human ex- 
periences. Miss Stein's studio was the 
center of a group of modern painters 
known as Cubists. She and her brother 
bought paintings innumerable when they 
were considered practically valueless. 

Miss Stein is also highly interested in 
literature. As a child when reading she 
would fear that the day would come 
when she had read all the books writ- 
ten and there would be nothing to which 
she could look forward. Finally, how- 
ever, when she had visited some of the 
big libraries, she became less afraid. 
Miss Stein has written, too; her most 
outstanding is "Three Lives". 

Many would expect Gertrude Stein to 
be a freak, but she isn't. You feel 
that she loves the world outdoors. She's 
not afraid that, if people meet and know 
her, her reputation will be ruined, for 
she doesn't write what she herself isn't. 

It is strange that a book so essentially 
American, which presents such a true, 
vivid story of the American spirit, 
should be written by one who has spent 
so many years in Europe. But Ger- 
trude Stein would be "a rose" no mat- 
ter where she lives. — M. J. S. 



Six from L.V. Named 
On Mount [St. Mary's 
All-Opponent Team 



Mt. St. Mary's College of Emmits- 
burg, Md., recently announced that four 
Lebanon Valley gridders had been 
placed on their first string all-opponent 
team, with two more receiving honorable 
mention. This selection came as a re- 
sult of votes cast by the lettermen of the 
Maryland institution. Following is the 
team as it was picked. 

Ends: Williams, Lebanon Valley; 
Brennan, La Salle. 

Tackles: Volkin, Lebanon Valley; 
Saduskey, Western Maryland. 

Guards: Mylnarski, Georgetown; Fur- 
long, Lebanon Valley. 

Center: Callahan, Georgetown. 

Quarterback: Rust, Lebanon Valley. 

Halfbacks: Shepard, Western Mary- 
land; McNally, Western Maryland. 

Fullback: Bradley, Georgetown. 
Honorable Mention 

Ends: Kozma, Gettysburg; Carney, 
St. Vincent's. 

Tackles: McKernon, La Salle; Heck- 
ert, St. Vincent's; Rose, Lebanon Valley. 

Guards: B. Sponaugle, Lebanon Val- 
ley; Nye, Gettysburg; Lord, Washington 
College. 

Centers: Hurley, Western Maryland; 
Dooley, La Salle; Harris, Washington 
College. 

Quarterbacks: Lucas, La Salle; Don- 
nelly, St. Vincent's. 

Halfbacks: Howard, Gettysburg; 
Johnson, St. Vincent's; Dobkins, Wash- 
ington College. 

Fullbacks: Burns, Loyola; Dunn, 
Western Maryland. 



Schedule Released 

For 1934 Gridders 



Lebanon Valley's 1934 grid schedule 
finds the Flying Dutchmen playing the 
same teams as were met in 1933 with but 
two exceptions. Muhlenberg and St. Jo- 
seph's replace Bucknell and Mt. St. 
Mary's on the Blue and White schedule. 

The Albright game, played the last 
few years in Reading, will be played in 
Lebanon in the coming season. We also 
notice that, for the first time in three 
years, Lebanon Valley will not play a 
game under the floodlights. 
Lebanon Valley 1934 Football Schedule 
Oct. 6 — Penn State, State College, Pa. 
Oct. 13 — Muhlenberg, Allentown, Pa. 
Oct. 20 — Drexel, Philadelphia. 
Oct. 27 — Univ. of Delaware, Newark, 
Del. 

Nov. 3 — Juniata, (pending). 
Nov. 10 — St. Joseph, home. 
Nov. 17 — Open 
Nov. 24 — Albright, home. 
Nov. 29 — Penn. Military College, Ches- 
ter, Pa. 




DINE and DANCE 

AT THE 

GREEN TERRACE 

ONE MILE EAST OF ANNVILLE 




WE INVITE 
L. V. C. 
STUDENTS 
TO TRY OUR 
DELICIOUS 
FOODS. 



KONSKO'S FROSH 
IN GOOD SHAPE 



Coach George Konsko has been work- 
ing daily with his Lebanon Valley Frosh 
quintet in order to get them in shape for 
the opening encounter with the F. dc M. 
Frosh, a preliminary to the Nevonian- 
Flying Dutchmen game scheduled for 
Saturday night. 

The following have been practicing 
daily: guards, Snell, Bachman, Kell, 
Speg, Walker, Crook, and Masimer; for- 
wards, Donmoyer, Hollingsworth, Holtz- 
man, Kinney and Loose, while the cen- 
ters are Lazin, Leech, Houtz and Billet. 
The probable starters in the F. 8C MT 
Frosh game will be Speg and Snell, 
guards; Billet, center, and Kinney and 
Donmoyer, forwards. 



The Irishman loves his "whiskey 

straight," 
Because it gives him dizziness. 
The American has no choice at all, 
So he drinks the whole business. 



St. Patrick was a gentleman 
Who, through strategy and stealth, 
Drove all the snakes from Ireland — 
Here's a bumper to his health. 
But not too many bumpers, 
Lest we lose ourselves, and then 
Forget the good St. Patrick 
And see the snakes again! 



Women are like tricks by sleight of 
hand, 

Which to admire, we should not under- 
stand. 



Now came still evening on and twi- 
light gray, 
And in her somber livery all thing clad. 

— Milton 



J. E. GIPPLE 

FIRE INSURANCE 

AND 

REAL ESTATE 

1251 Market Street 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



KREAMER BROS. 



EASY ELECTRIC WASHERS 
GAS STOVES AND RANGES 
RUGS AND LINOLEUMS 
PICTURE FRAMING 



Furniture - - Undertaking 



Phone 144 ANNVILLE, PA. 



SPECIAL CARDS 
SPECIAL STATIONERY 
and a SPECIAL WELCOME 

. . . at . . . 

BOLLMAN'S 

Book and Stationery Store 

33 S. 8th St. - LEBANON, PA. 



Steve Wornas 

Hoffman Steam Pressing 
Keystone Hat Cleaning 

lO WEST MAIN STREET 
ANNVILLE. PA. 

H. W. MILLER 

Hardware of Quality 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

A&PTEA CO. 

C. H. SHEARER, Mgr. 



GRIMM'S BOOK STORE 

SPECIAL 
CROWN SET 

CLIONIAN PINS—S12.00 



FOR QUALITY 

Baked Products 

PATRONIZE 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



MEN S CORDUROY SLACKS 
NAVY TAN GREY 

MEN S SUEDE RAIN COATS 
TAN GREY 

JOHN HIRSH 

9-11 W. Main St. ANNVILLE 



D. L. Say lor & Sons 
CONTRACTORS 

LUMBER and COAL 
Annville, Pennsylvania 



Mauro D'Enno 

207 WEST MAIN STREET 

Meti's, Women's, Children'* 
RUBBER HEELS - 25c 
Open every evening till eight o'clock 



SANDWICHES SODAS 

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CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. B ASHORE 



LEBANON. PENNSYLVANIA 



-^1 



THE PENNWAY 



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IaWie€c%iennt 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Beat the Bears 



VOL. X 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1934 



No. 19 



Roth and Students 
Conduct Service 



LOUIS STRAUB IS SPEAKER 



Deisher, Krone, Mentzer, Ranck, 
And Hiltner Assist With 
Music 



Dale Roth appeared with a group of 
college students in a religious service at 
the Evangelical Church on North White 
Oak street in Annville, January 28. Mr. 
Roth has at several former times con- 
ducted such services in various churches, 
the majority of the services being musi- 
cal in nature. 

The service Sunday afternoon was in- 
troduced by the minister of the church, 
Rev. H. J. Kline. He opened the meet- 
ing with devotions and a few congrega- 
tional hymns. Mr. Roth then took 
charge, and introduced the college stu- 
dents who were to assist him. 

The details of the program included 
two trombone solos by Mr. Roth, vocal 
solos by Mr. Roth and Mr. Ranck, selec- 
tions by the male quartette and the trio, 
and a piano solo as an offertory. De- 
parting from the musical nature of the 
service, Mr. Louis Straub made a very 
fine address on the thought which Jesus 
Christ expressed in His statement, "Ye 
shall be my witnesses." Mr. Straub 
spoke with evidence of fine preparation 
and deep thought, quoting frequently 
by memory from well-known authors, 
and expressing himself in a very com- 
mendable style. 

The afternoon service was enjoyed by 
an auditorium full of people represent- 
ing several of the denominations of the 
town. The personnel of the college 
group included Miss Deisher, pianist and 
accompanist, Mr. Warren Mentzer, 
bass; Mr. Krone, baritone; Mr. Roth, 
second tenor, Mr. Ranck, first tenor; 
Mr. Hiltner, second tenor in the trio, 
and Mr. Straub, the speaker. 



Students and Faculty 

Hear Fritz Kreisler 



L AR G E CROWD ATTENDS 

Many Pleasant And Enjoyable 
Numbers Received By Ap- 
preciative Audience 



The all-star concert series presented 
ritz Kreisler, the eminent violinist, in a 
**cital on Thursday evening, January 
at the Forum in Harrisburg. The 
F°rum was filled to capacity, and a most 
er »thusiastic audience showed their appre- 
ciation throughout the program. 

The campus people who attended the 
c °ncert wer e Dr. and Mrs. Bender, Dr. 
Mrs. Derrickson, Professor Malsh, 
lss Gillespie, Miss Leitzau, Miss Moy- 
^ r > Professor and Mrs. Carmean, Pro- 
f ss °r and Mrs. Rutledge, Professor 



Stok 
EL 



es > Robert Heath, Misses Dietrick, 
s er, Stabley, Keller, and Russel Hate.- 
s Kre 'sler's program follows: 
^ 0r »ata, C minor Beethoven 

0r »ata, G major (for violin alone) 
^ Bach 
M °^n ce in p Beethoven 
T ^aguena Albeniz-Kreisler 
Albeniz-Kreisler 
I ~. . e aux cheveux de bin Debussy 
C SWd - Cyril Scott 

HVm " '0 the Sun 

p a Rimsky-Korsakoff -Kreisler 

tas ' e on Russian Themes 

Rimsky-Korsakoff -Kreisler 



Senior Girls Present 

At Afternoon Tea 



OTHER TEAS PLANNED 



The seniors today attended the first 
of the annual Y. W. C. A. teas in North 
Hall parlor. Each year the association 
plans a tea for each of the four classes. 
Margaret Longenecker, as chairman of 
the social committee, is in charge of the 
functions. Each week she will be assisted 
by a committee of members of other 
classes. This week the Sophomores 
formed the committee. Thess included 
Louise Gillan, Thelma McCreary, Iva 
Claire Weirick, Louise Shearer and Rae 
Anna Reber. Margaret Kohler acted as 
hostess at this tea. 



Wrestlers Beaten By 
Wyoming Seminary 

COLLEGIANS DEFEATED, 38-0 



Well Organized Team Proves That 
Experience Is Most Im- 
portant Factor 



A group of eight local wrestling en- 
thusiasts, under the name of the "Col- 
legians," traveled to Kingston, Penna., 
last Friday night to compete on the mat 
with Wyoming Seminary. In picking 
this team as their second opponent of 
the year, the local wrestlers met a tartar, 
losing by the overwhelming score of 38-0. 
But it can not be said of the Collegians 
that they did not make a game fight. 
For every match was keenly contested in 
spite of the odds against the local team's 
success. 

Wyoming Seminary has boasted of 
champion wrestling teams for several 
years and this year is no exception. They 
have built up an enviable reputation in 
the past until today they are regarded so 
highly as to be included on the Fresh- 
man wrestling schedule of these large 
universities: Columbia, Yale, Princeton, 
and Lehigh. Thus one can easily see 
the kind of competition the Collegians 
had to face. The Seminary team was 
well drilled in the fundamentals of the 
sport and displayed a much greater 
knowledge of the tricks of the contest, 
as might be expected from their wide 
experience. Besides, Wyoming has one 
of the best wrestling coaches in the east 
in the person of Austin Bishop, a for- 
mer Franklin and Marshall star, and 
now a wrestling referee of national re- 
nown. 

In the face of all these disadvantages, 
the best thing the Collegians could do 
was to go in the ring and take it. And 
take it they did, — losing seven of the 
eight matches by falls, the other one by 
a decision; but only after several min- 
utes of strenuous wrestling. In the first 
bout, Allen Buzzell lost to Letorre of 
Wyoming in the 118 class in a half Nel- 
son and wrist hold. In the 126 pound 
class, Lee defeated Beaver of the Colle- 
gians by a fall in 2 minutes. In the next 
class, 135 pounds, Jim Fridy lost by a 
fall to Brennan. Paul Hershey made the 
best showing of the local team against 
any of the opponents when he battled 
Richards for more than 7 minutes before 
losing the decision. Dale Roth, Curwen 
Thompson, Jack Todd and John Houtz. 
in the 155, 165, 175 and heavyweight 
classes respectively, all lost their matches 
by falls to their more clever opponents. 



Mothers' Week-End 
Planned By YWCA 

TO BE HELD IN MARCH 



Saturday Afternoon Program, Sun- 
day Worship, And Tea 
Among Plans 



The Y. W. C. A. is planning a 
Mother's Week-end for March 10 and 
11. At that time the women students 
are urged to invite their mothers to be 
their guests for the week-end. The plans 
for their entertainment are not complete. 
A student program Saturday afternoon 
in Engle Hall is the first event scheduled. 
The Sunday morning worship service 
at the college church will be especially 
planned for the mothers. A tea Sunday 
afternoon will close the week-end. Other 
plans will be completed at a later date. 
This is the first time that such an event 
has been scheduled on our campus. If 
it proves worthwhile, perhaps this week- 
end will have a permanent place on the 
college calendar. 



KALOZETEANS WILL NOT 
PRESENT MINSTREL SHOW 



An important business meeting of the 
Kalozetean Literary Society was held in 
Kalo Hall January 30. After a lengthy 
discussion, the members voted to leave 
the minstrels out of the year's program. 
Although this is an annual event, it was 
thought that too many other activities 
will take the time of the members in the 
next few months. Also, at this meeting, 
the various committees were appointed 
to arrange the dinner-dance, which is 
dated for the night of April 8. 



PAINTERS BEAUTIFYING 

AD. BUILDING INTERIOR 



The interior of the Administration 
building will have taken on a complete 
new appearance by February 15. The 
gymnasium will be ready for use again 
in about ten days. Aside from the work 
of giving the gym the usual three coats 
of paint, it was necessary to plaster in a 
new ceiling. Two shifts of workers total- 
ing twenty men are making a quick and 
efficient job of the painting; the first 
and second floors ha,ve already been com- 
pleted. 



Delphian Girls Give 

Anniversary Plans 

COMMITTEES A P P O INTED 



Afternoon Tea, Date Night, And 
DeMolay Orchestra At Dance 
Features In Gala Affair 



February 17 will mark the eleventh 
anniversary of Delphian. The anniver- 
sary dance will be held at the Civic Club 
in Harrisburg. The De Molay orchestra, 
a very popular and well known orches- 
tra, ha s been secured to play at the 
dance. 

An alumni tea will be given the after- 
noon of the anniversary in Delphian 
hall in honor of th<J visiting alumni, the 
Delphian girls and their guests. On 
February 9th a date night will be held 
in Delphian Hall. The committees have 
their work well under way and the anni- 
versary is expected to be a big success. 



CACEMEN OPEN 1934 

BASKETBALL SEASON 



Victories Scored Over Drexel, Muhlenberg, Frank- 
lin and Marshall — One Point Decision Dropped 
to Undefeated Gettysburg Bullets; Fast Game 



BARTHOLD TAKES SCORING HONORS 



By DeWitt Essick 
On Saturday, Feb. 3, when Hooks Mylin's fast Flying Dutchmen 
meet the Ursinus Bear in Lebanon, the Blue and White will be out to 
seek their first Eastern Pennsylvania Collegiate basketball league cham- 
pionship. Not since three years ago when Cal Heller was a big gun for 
Lebanon Valley has Mylin's team had, a better chance to win the league 



crown. 



To-date the Blue and White have scored league triumphs over 
DrexeL Franklin and Marshall, and Muhlenberg, dropping their only 
league loss to Gettysburg by a scant one-point margin, and this 



"-"6 -~ 1.~ - o ,r o 

the Bullets home floor, the Eddie Plank gym in the Battlefield 



was on 



town. 



Allan Ranck Writes 
Telescope Article 

GIVE LIST OF L. V. LIFE 

Y.M.C.A. President Tells of Influ- 
ences of Campus Christian 
Organizations 

The following are paragraphs from 
an article by J. Allan Ranck, which ap- 
peared in the Religious Telescope as part 
of the program of Educational Week of 
the United Brethren Church. 

Lebanon Valley College has stood 
since its beginning as a Christian col- 
lege. Her policy has been Christian and 
upon that reputation has hung much of 
the religious thought and feeling of the 
school. The religious influences of the 
college find expression in the various 
organizations of student and faculty par- 
ticipation. These are never constant, for 
they, too, only reflect the lives and the 
standards of those who at any time are 
responsible for their propogation. Leba- 
non Valley is not static; it changes con- 
stantly with the entrance of new students 
and new administrations, although it is 
true that these are always limited, to a 
certain extent, by past history. And as 
Lebanon Valley College is religiously 
what its students are, what its adminis- 
trators are able to make it in policy. 
Student life reveals itself through its or- 
ganizations. 

These three organizations comprise 
the most important religious groups on 
the campus. It is interesting to note the 
different ways in which they approach 
the religious problems of the young peo- 
ple. The student prayer meeting affords 
to all the opportunity to give expression 
to their religious natures in a period of 
worship and prayer. The life-work re- 
cruit group is preparing a smaller and 
limited group in religious leadership. 
And thirdly, the Christian Associations 
take in hand positive and progressive 
act's of service by means of which they 
guide and influence religious thought. 
The three arc complementary and quite 
inclusive with respect to methods of ap- 
proach to religious questions. 

Lebanon Valley upholds its honor as 
a Christian college. Its purpose and its 
achievement is the development of life 
and adequate philosophies of life. Whe- 
ther it be student organizations, policies 
of administration, personal contacts 
(Continued on Pags 2; Col. 3) 



With this record 
the Dutchmen are 
favored to win on 
Saturday from the 
tail- end Ursinus 
Chances Good 
With a veteran 
aggregation of drib- 
blers such as Mylin 
has to depend on 
for bis surcss this 
season, Lebanon 
Valley should easily 
defeat Gettysburg 
bQKTriOLi} at Lebanon on 
February 10, and win all her remaining 
games. Albright is the only other league 
team, which really might be a contender 
(Continued on Page 4; Col. 1) 




Snavely To Be Coach 

At North Carolina 



IS LEBANON VALLEY GRAD 



Mylin Considered For Vacancy 
At Bucknell — North Caro- 
lina Hopeful 



University of North Carolina students 
and alumni looked hopefully to the fu- 
ture with a new football coaching staff 
and a new captain. 

The athletic council last week selected 
Carl Snavely, Bucknell University coach, 
to succeed Charles C. (Chuck) Collins, 
whose contract was not renewed. 

The athletic council's act followed 
closely upon the football squad selection 
of George T. Barclay, a guard of Na- 
trona, Pa., as captain of the 1934 team. 

The new A. of N. C. coach was a lu- 
minary at Lebanon Valley during his 
under-graduate days and is a close 
friend of E. E. Mylin, director of ath- 
letics at Lebanon Valley College. 

Upon Snavely's resignation, Mylin re- 
ceived consideration as a possible Buck- 
nell mentor, and it is said that the for- 
mer F. and M. star may accept the Lew- 
isburg offer. 

Snavely, who coached at Bellefonte 
Academy and at Kiski before going to 
Bucknell, was given the privilege of 
naming his assistants. Snavely told Ath- 
letic Director Robert A. Fetzer over long 
distance telephone that Maxwell Reed, 
line coach at Bucknell the past five years, 
would be brought here in the same capa- 
city. 



I 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, F RIDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1934 



la Viz Coilegterme 

ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Edmund Umberger, '34 .. .Editor-in-Chief 
Kathryn Mowrey, '34 ... .Associate Editor 
Richard Schreiber, '34 . .Managing Editor 
Richard Baus, '37 Asst. Man. Editor 

REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Martha Kreider, '34 
Allan Ranck, '34 
Elizabeth Schaak, '34 
Helen Earnest, '35 
Sylvia Evelev, '36 

David Yake, '36 General Reporters 

Christine Gruber, '34 Conservatory 

DeWitt Essick, '34 

George Hiltner, '35 Athletics 

Catherine Wagner, '35 Alumni 

Russell Aucott, '37 Art 

Clyde Mentzer, '34 Philokosmian 

Robert Cassel, '36 Kalozetean 

Jane Shellenberger, '36 Clionian 

Marietta Ossl, '35 Delphian 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Jack Todd, '34 Business Manager 

Kenneth Sheaffer, '35 .Asst. Bus. Manager 
Allen Buzzell, '34. . .Circulation Manager 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 



Single Copies 6 cents 

Subscription $1-00 per year 



Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter, under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1934 



EXAMS 



Whew! That's over for another semes- 
ter. How will the many students occupy 
themselves without the pleasurable grind 
of burning the midnight oil, pushing 
scratchy pens across the books, brush- 
ing weary, moist brows, and having a 
generally befuddled mental condition? 
What a thrill to think of no more cram- 
ming for five long months, when dry 
and lengthy reading can be cast aside 
until the next startling necessity looms 
before our eager eyes. Yes, there will 
be protests — some never cram; instead 
they always keep up to the minute in 
every subject. Yes? Or — "Oh, no, it 
won't be that way this semester; I'm go- 
ing to dig in right away, beginning to- 
morrow." They mean well, but — numer- 
ous noble resolutions are annually made 
to turn a leaf and begin college life 
anew, progressing with glorious leaps 
and bounds, a zest for textbooks, and a 
daily class preparation. The Lebanon 
Valley veteran will shout "hooey,' 1 hav- 
ing learned in the school of bitter experi- 
ence that such idealistic tendencies are 
not natural to the human race, and espe- 
cially not to the species at large upon 
our campus. 

One truly noble soul suggested that 
every individual should be allowed to 
cut one exam each semester. That per- 
son had the revolutionary spirit of Shel- 
ley, the true Christian attitude, and a 
splendid conception of brotherhood. 
(We wonder how many juniors would 
have been among the missing during the 
psychology brainstorm!) How many 
"profs" apply the Golden Rule when 
they are concocting an exam — "do unto 
others as you would have them do unto 
you"? 

Then, during the two trying weeks of 
intense concentration we always have in 
our minds those wet blankets or general 
nuisances that we would and could will- 
ingly do without. The one who is fin- 
ished carefree after the first four days 
and who continues to torment the life 
out of any peace-loving, well-meaning 
individual; or the one who never fails to 
claim that his (or her) exam last year 
was far more difficult than this present 
one. Still more irritating is the student 



who never studies, is never worried, al- 
ways calm and collected — or, so he says 
— but who appears at the fatal moment 
with a washed-out countenance, a hang- 
dog look, bitten finger nails, chattering 
teeth, and a noticeably well-worn text- 
book. It is through these more trifling 
incidents that even a normally sound 
individual is driven to distraction, hair 
tearing, foaming at the mouth, and a 
complete nervous breakdown. 

At present it is our greatest regret 
that the slightly frosty air forbids us 
with filling our souls with nature's reme- 
dy (and by that is not meant "Lydia 
Pinkham's Compound"). One can eas- 
ily imagine himself strolling in the wide 
open spaces; the wind howling through 
the trees, meditating upon the beauties 
of the scenery and of life in general. 
Perhaps by means of a brief brain recess 
we can again collect our wits and make 
some very definite and noticeable ad- 
vances to success. The return to classes 
and the smell of paint will again put us 
on our feet for the new semester. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



Mrs. Kathryn Harriet Bixler, wife of 
John A. Bixler, died January 27, 1934. 
Mrs. Bixler was the former Kathryn 
Hagner of Reading. Both Mr. and Mrs. 
Bixler were students at Lebanon Valley 
College. 



Miss Margaret Young, of Lebanon, 
became the bride of Mr. Leonard 
Schrope, of Valley View, last August. 
Mrs. Schrope graduated from Lebanon 
Valley College with the class of '31. She 
was Professor Crawford's assistant. 

Mr. Schrope also was graduated from 
this institution with the class of '33. He 
holds a lucrative position in Newburgh, 
N. Y. 



Miss Anna C. Young, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Young, has an- 
nounced her engagement to R. Leslie 
Saunders, Jr., son of Mrs. R. L. Saun- 
ders. 




An Umberger axiom — Do right and 
fear no man. Don't write and fear no 
woman. 



Prof. — "Now, gentlemen, I don't mind 
your looking at your watches but please 
be courteous enough not to hold them 
up to your ear as if you thought they 
had stopped running." 



Mr. Wit — I don't like to see our 
daughter lighting cigarettes. 

Mrs. Wit — Oh, don't be old-fashioned, 
dear. 

Mr. Wit — It isn't that. She's too 
young to be playing with matches. 



Prof. Gingrich — They tell me the 
Colonel is a sexagenarian. 

Prof. Butterwick — The old fool! And 
at his age, too! 



Thompson — The girl I have back 
home has an identical twin sister. 

Houtz — How do you tell them apart? 

Thompson — I don't. It's up to the 
other one to look out for herself. 



Rader — Say, what's the idea of wear- 
ing my raincoat? 

Krone — Well, you wouldn't want your 
new suit to get wet, would you? 



Minna — So Morgon said that I had a 
skin one loves to touch? 

Chief — Not exactly. He said you 
had a skin you love to retouch. 



Mary wore a little skirt, 
'Twas neat, 'twa s light, 'twas airy; 
It never showed a speck of dirt, 
But it surely did show Mary. 



Prominent Lebanon Valley Seniors 




GEM GEMMILL 
A popular leader in society and 
campus affairs, who was recently elected 
anniversary president of Delphian Lit- 
erary Socity. 




MIRIAM BOOK 
Who has been elected president of 
Clionnian Literary Society for the com- 
ing term. Her original ide*as will be 
demonstrated fully in her new admin- 
istrative capacity. 



Literary Societies Elect Officers 



Miss Gem Gemmill has been elected 
anniversary president of Delphian. 
Other anniversary officers are: Miss 
Dorothy Jackson, vice-president; Miss 
Marietta Ossi, corresponding secretary; 
Miss Helen Grusko, recording secretary; 
Miss Louise Bishop, chaplain; Miss Char- 
lotte Stabley, pianist; Miss Ida K. Hall, 
critic; Miss Elizabeth Benjaman, and 
Miss Cordelia Shaeffer, wardens. 



Miss Miriam Book, prominent mem- 
ber of Clio, has been elected to fill the 
office of president. The clever programs 
for which she is noted will be prepared 
under her direction by these other new- 
ly-elected officers:' Rose Dieter, Mary 
Jane Shellenberger, Virginia Britton, 
Emma Reinbold, Lois Harbold, Maxine 
Earley, Selma Grim. 



She was sitting in a dark corner. Nois- 
lessly he stole up behind her, and before 
she was aware of his presence he had 
kissed her. 

"How dare you," she shrieked. 

"Pardon me," he lied, glibly. "I 
thought you were my sister." 

"You dumb ox, I am your sister." 



Some men grow under responsibility; 
others only sweil. 



And the prof who said, "Golf is like 
a love affair; if you don't take it seri- 
ously, it's no fun; if you do, it breaks 
your heart. 



Hauck — Women don't interest me. I 
prefer the company of my fellow men. 
Buzzell — I'm broke too, brother. 



Anyway, there's one advantage in hav- 
ing a wooden leg. You can hold your 
socks up with thumb tacks. 



Hershey — Tom says Millie is so pretty 
she's a regular optical illusion. 

Kreamer — Humph! Optical illusion! 
A vision in the evening, a sight in the 
morning. 



GIRLS OPEN 1934 

BASKETBALL SEASON 



Cohen says, "It is better to have loved 
and lost — much better." 



Remley — Did you shave this morning, 
McGee? 

McGee — Yeh, why? 

Remley — Well, next time stand a little 
closer to the razor. 



From the Final Examination 

What is a projector? 

In education the teacher is often 
spoken of as a projector because she 
puts the educational processes before the 
student in such a manner as to enable 
the student to grasp them. 



ALLAN RANCK MAKES 
BOW AS BUDDING AUTHOR 



(Continued from Page One) 



with faculty or students, or the college 
church, Lebanon Valley College is exert- 
ing a powerful influence for Christ and 
His righteousness. 



The schedule for the girls' basket- 
ball team is as follows: 

February 3 — Juniata Away 

7 — Ursinus Away 

10 — Juniata Home 

13 — Elizabethtown Away 

17 — Keystone Girls Home 

(Myerstown) 

24 — Penn Hall —._ - Home 

March 3 — Open. 

10 — Albright Home 

17 — Elizabethtown Home 

24 — Open. 
31 — Open. 
A game with the University of Balti- 
more is as yet undecided. All the home 
games will be played at the high school 
at two o'clock. However, the Ursinus 
and Elizabethtown games, which will be 
played away, will take place in the eve- 
ning. Some of the games will be played 
three-division (side center, center, two 
guards and two forwards on each team) 
and some two-division (three forwards 
and three guards). 

The lineup for the Juniata game is: 
Orth, center; Wolfskeil or Chamberlin, 
side center; Krebs, forward; Gemmill, 
forward; I. Weirick and C. Weirick, 
guards. This is only a tentative arrange- 
ment, as many substitutions will be made 
for other games. The remainder of the 
squad is Fasnacht, manager; Harkins, 
H. March, R. Adams, S. Light, L. Miller, 
M. Smith and E. Engle. Unfortunately, 
E. Brinkley will be unable to play this 
season because of an injury. 

The report of Miss Kenyon, coach, is 
very favorable. The team has been prac- 
ticing regularly, and works very well to- 
gether. The playing seems efficient, and 
the new as well as the veteran members 
of the team combine to make it an out- 
standing one this year. 



Care to our coffins adds a nail, no doubt; 
And every grin so merry draws one out. 

—Dr. Wolcob. 



The first duty of bachelors — to ring 
city belles. 



The praiseworthy glazier who makes 
panes to see his way through life. 



Freshman Theme 

MY FAVORITE ENGLISH 
TEACHER 



In the course of my education, I have 
had many teachers, male and female 
good, bad, and indifferent. From this 
variety of pedagogues one man stands 
out more vividly in my memory than 
the rest, and justly so! 

Mr. Allen was my junior English 
teacher. We were his first class in our 
particular high school; perhaps he 
wished we were also the last. 

He was of medium height and rather 
slight. One's first and most enduring 
impression of him wa s perhaps a pair of 
pale, pink-rimmed eyes blinking and 
glistening with everlasting tears from be- 
hind a pair of tortoise-shell spectacles, 
the whole effect embellished by the pres- 
ence of a stray lock of wavy hair. One 
of his characteristic motions was sweep- 
ing this aforesaid decoration back to its 
proper place atop his head with one 
graceful swing of a gorgeously mani- 
cured hand. He rarely laughed and 
when he did so it seemed to be a painful 
process and was always accompanied 
with terrific blushes as though he were 
ashamed. Mr. Allen defied all the rules 
of thundering virility by calmly carrying 
a modest black umbrella when the sky 
was threatening and marching very de- 
murely beneath it when the heavens 
made good their threat. 

His dress was most astonishing. Shirts 
and ties of the most brilliant and scream- 
ing hues and awe-inspiring combinations 
were strung about his rather scrawny 
neck . His shoes were dainty and highly 
polished; this was most necessary as he 
had a devouring passion for perching 
on the edge of anything that would hold 
him and swinging one gracefully pointed 
toe in rhythmic and highly terpsicho- 
rean motion. His voice was most appro- 
priate; it was a warbling falsetto with 
edifying variations that might have 
wrung the heart of a coloratura. 

Naturally, Mr. Allen became notori- 
ous. He was the most talked-of man in 
the school. He was better known than 
the current football star, and every stu- 
dent in the building could exhibit an 
amazingly perfect imitation of him at a 
moment's notice. It was a particular 
privilege to be in his class. 

Here he shone with all the glory of a 
monarch on his throne. No one knew 
more English and less anything else 
than he. Big words, tremendous, gig an ' 
tic words were his particular forte. He 
hurled them at his bewildered students 
with fiendish glee. His weapon of de- 
fense and sometimes, when he felt a bit 
bold, of offense, was sarcasm. His tongU e 
was positively stinging and always hit 
the mark. Many of the victims, how- 
ever, remained blissfully ignorant of this 
menace to their well-being, proving the 
theory that where there is no sense thef e 
is no feeling. 

A s we came to know Mr. Allen better 
and got used to his eccentricities, we 
learned to like him; until among n ' s 
own students he became as popular aS 
he had been notorious, and it was wit 
real regret that we left him for the U n 
known ogre that presided over seni° r 



English. 



JERRELL- 



Howard Sisters Sing 

In Chapel Service 

The Howard sisters of Reading. 
Penna., visited some friends in An 11 ' 
ville Tuesday, January 16. Whil e 
here, they attended the chapel s ef ' 
vice at the college and sang the w^ 
known sacred selection, "My Task- 
The Howard sisters are singing eva^ 
gelists who go to various commun 1 ' 
ties upon request. They have accofl 1 ' 
plished much and have been vcr ^ 
successful in this field of Christ' 3 " 
work. 



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LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1934 



PAGE THREE 



ave 
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and 
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istu-" 1 



Dr. Shenk Discusses Education in Early Pennsylvania 



Centenary of the Adoption of the Free 
School System in Pennsylvania. 

By Dr. Hiram H. Shenk 

pennsylvanians have given expression 
their patriotic spirit and to their gra- 
£ ° j, ro eminent men of the past by 
arious commemorative celebrations dur- 
mg the past few years. In 1932 the two 
'hundredth anniversary of the birth of 
he great astronomer and member of the 
American Philosophic Society, David 
R i t tenhouse, was observed. Later in the 
ea r the bicentenary of the birth of John 
DicUonson, the Penman of the Revolu- 
was celebrated. During the entire 
ear in official circles in our public 
schools and throughout the common- 
wealth generally, all citizens joined in 
the commemoration of the bicentenary 
f the birth of George Washington 
whose major achievement* were per- 
formed in Pennsylvania. The founder 
of the province was also widely honored 
in the celebration of the 250th anniver- 
sary of the first arrival of William Penn 
in this country. 

In 1933 Germantown celebrated the 
250th anniversary of its founding by 
Francis Daniel Pastorius, graduate of 
the Law School at Altdorf and master 
of eight languages, who arrived October 
6, 1683, on the ship Concord, who later 
started a school at Germantown and 
wrote the first Pennsylvania school book. 

None of these anniversaries, however, 
can match in importance to the average 
citizen the forthcoming celebration of 
the 100th anniversary of the adoption 
of the free school system of Pennsylva- 
nia. The Department of Public In- 
struction is preparing a bulletin on this 
subject which will, I hope, arouse the 
interest which the subject merits. 

While Lebanon Valley College will 
join in this celebration, she will have a 
special celebration of her own. For it 
was one hundred years ago that Annville 
became an educational center with the 
founding of the Annville Academy, the 
local predecessor of the college. This 
event will be duly commemorated, and 
an effort will be made to bring to the 
campus men and women who attended 
the Academy. If is a fortunate circum- 
stance that this year there appears from 
the press of the Science Press Printing 
Company, Lancaster, a History of Sec- 
ondary Education in Pennsylvania, by 
Dr. James Mulhern of the University of 
Pennsylvania. This scholarly work is the 
best contribution to the history of Acade- 
mies in Pennsylvania that has yet been 
written, and the most thorough study of 
the history of education in Pennsylvania 
that has ever been made. We shall there- 
ore be in a position to study the growth 
°f the Annville Academy in its relation 
t0 the development of the educational 
astern of Pennsylvania. 

The delay in establishing a system of 
ornmon Schools was in no sense the 
j^ ui t of the proprietor. In his Frame of 
government', Penn provided "that the 
G °vernor and Provincial Council shall 
ef ect and order all public schools and 
en courag e and reward the authors of 



when we are gone. Therefore, depress 
vice and cherish virtue that through 
good education they may become good. 
If this is done they will owe more to your 
memories for their education than for 
their estates." 

The high standards set by Penn were 
not carried out in legislation until a 
century and a half had elapsed. Many 
immigrants of culture had arrived, but 
their strenuois work as frontiersmen 
gave little time for learning and the 
scholarship of the second generation of 
immigrants was very low. 

The Constitution of 1776 contained 
a provision very little, if any, in ad- 
vance of Penn's Frame, while the Con- 
stitution of 1790 weakened rather than 
strengthened, that of 1776 by providing 
that the poor shall be taught gratis. 

From this date down to the adoption 
of the Free School System, it was neces- 
sary for parents who could not afford to 
pay the price of tuition, to register as 
paupers. Children in families of respec- 
tability were thus humiliated. In the 
Division of Archives, in the Pennsylva- 
nia State Library are found proposals 
made by teachers during this period 
from which I quote the following: 
Copies of manuscripts found in the 
JOHN R. MILLER COLLECTION 
concerning Schools for Poor Children. 

November 22nd, 1822 
Gentlemen Agreeable to Your adver- 
tisement of the 5th insf, I would propose 
to teach the Pauper children of the Bor- 
ough of Carlisle for six hundred and 
fifty dollars per annum finding books 
and stationery and everything necessary 
for the schoolroom myself, 

And to teach them agreeable to the 
Lancastarian (Lancasterian) plan of 
teaching should this proposal meet your 
approbation the favour will be remem- 
bered with gratitude by gentlemen. Your 
Humble Servt, 

(Signed) James Carothers. 

Nov. 22nd. 1822 

To the Commissioners of Cumberland 
County 
Gentlemen, 

In compliance with your notice given 
in the newspaper, soliciting proposals 
for the education of the pauper chil- 
dren of the Borough of Carlisle 



useful 



sciences and laudable inventions 



n the said Province. And p 

^ade for a committee of manners, edu- 

Cat 'on and arts, that all wicked and 

^andalous living may be prevented, and 

youth may be successively trained 

p ln virtue and useful knowledge and 
arts." 



Il » the 1 



Provis 



aws agreed upon in England 



l8l °n was also made for a system of 

"tb. UStnal ec * ucation - T bis law provides 
f a ^ children within this Province 
ta , G a 8 e °f twelve years, shall be 

?nd S ° me USefuI trade or ski11 ' t0 thc 
w . °" e ma y be idle, but the poor may 

c om e t0 UVe ' and the rich ' if they be " 

In I J 00r ' may not want " 
" tne ater c °rrespondence Penn says, 

the 8 ° Vernmei ">t is a sort of trustee for 
Minors * °^ ^ kingdom, who, though 
' yet will have the government 



Encouraged by a number of my friends, 
I am inclined to offer to the honourable 
board, the following proposal. As I have 
reason to believe that some of the teach- 
ers have, or will hand in proposals for 
one fourth, or one section or ward, (if 
you are so disposed as to divide them in- 
to sections, wards, or in any other man- 
ner whatever), I will undertake one 
fourth, or one ward or section, for the 
sum of two hundred Dollars, and find 
everything necessary to make them com- 
fortable, and pledge myself to devote my 
time in advancing the improvement of 
the Children, if you are disposed to give 
them all to one man only, I would under- 
take them at seven hundred Dollars per 
annum — and find everything necessary 
as above, together with a sufficient num- 
ber of competent ushers. 

Yours very respectfully 8Cc, 

(Signed) Philip Messersmith. 
Shippensburg 15 Feby 1832 
Commissioners of Cumberland County... 
Gentlemen, 

I propose teaching the paupers of Ship- 
pensburg, and supplying them with 
books, stationery, flic, for one year, on 
the following conditions. . . . viz: 
If the list will not exceed 50 for #180 

If it will exceed 50 for $200 

Which is respectfully submitted. 
Yours, flic, 

(Signed) W. S. Anderson. 

The governors of Pennsylvania for 40 
years, from Mifflin in 1790 to Wolfe in 
1830, all recommended additional legis- 
lation but with no definite conclusion 
until Wolfe's leadership brought results 
in the Act signed April 1, 1834. The 
celebration will therefore center around 
this date. 



One of the organizations that contri- 
buted to the passage of the Act was the 
Pennsylvania Society for the Promotion 
of Public Schools. The report of this so- 
ciety, published April 12, 1828, summed 
up th? condition of education in Penn- 
rylvania and showed that the society had 
conducted a large correspondence with 
interested persons throughout the com- 
monwealth. 

The legislative session of L833 to 1834 
opened under favorable auspices. Gover- 
nor Wolfe made the subject of universal 
education the main topic of his annual 
message. Samuel Breck, senator from 
Philadelphia, was made chairman of the 
joint committee on education of the 
two Houses. This committee was special- 
ly appointed "for the purpose of digest- 
ing a general system of education." Sen- 
ator Breck had come to Pennsylvania 
from Massachusetts. He was a gentle- 
man of fortune, a scholar and withal 
public spirited. He accepted the election 
to the Senate for the sole purpose of 
helping to place on the statute books an 
act insuring universal education. Fortu- 
nately for the student of history he kept 
a journal which throws much light on 
the progress of free school legislation 
during this session. This journal shows 
that on December 9, 1833, he had an 
interview with Governor Wolfe who re- 
ceived him cordially, and surprised him 
by stating that he had never before 
thought of any system of general educa- 
tion. March 15, 1834, he says, "This 
morning the educational bill which has 
engaged much of my attention passed 
the Senate with three dissenting voices 
and these decidedly the most ignorant 
members. These three with one member 
of the House of Representatives, form a 
minority of the legislature. If this mea- 
sure shall work well my public life will 
have resulted in some good. I am happy 
to say that I was aided zealously and 
very ably by Dr. Anderson and Dr. 
Worthington of the House and by Mes- 
sers Jackson, Penrose and Read of the 
Senate." The Mr. Penrose of the Senate 
referred to wa s Charles B. Penrose of 
Carlisle, grandfather of the late Senator 
Penrose. 

But the nearly unanimous vote on the 
passage of the Free School Act of 1834 
was but the beginning of a great contro- 
versy, for many legislators had voted for 
the bill without realizing strenuous op- 
position which came from various 
sources. 

In southeastern Pennsylvania were 
aristocratic families who had retained 
European ideas of rank and who were 
out of harmony with the spirit of De- 
mocracy. Several religious denomina- 
tions opposed the law because they had 
their own church schools, and they ob- 
jected to secularizing education. Many 
persons opposed the bill because it was 
thought unjust to ask taxpayers to pay 
for the education of other people's chil- 
dren. The greatest opposition was made 
up of, the class that stubbornly resist all 
change. 

The opposition was registered in the 
election for members of the Senate and 
House in 1834, and it was evident that a 
serious attempt would be made to repeal 
the Act of 1834. Many members who 
had voted for the bill were defeated and 
when the Legislature met, notwithstand- 
ing Governor Wolfe's stand for the Act, 
the repeal bill passed the Senate with 
few dissenting votes. Numerously signed 
petitions asking for repeal had been pre- 
sented, and it was feared that the House 
would follow the Senate in voting for 
repeal. At this crisis Thaddeus Stevens 
took the floor, and delivered one of the 
great speeches of our history. 

I recall very distinctly that while at- 
tending the Dauphin County Institute 
in Harrisburg, as a teacher in the old 
Lehman School House in Derry Town- 
ship, I heard the then well known Dr 
Winship of Boston express pleasure at 
being in the city where was delivered one 



of the outstanding speeches of Ameri- 
can History, a speech that converted a 
minority into a majority and that has 
ever since been considered a masterly 
exposition of the cause of popular edu- 
cation. Recent writers have attempted 
to show that Stevens' speech was not so 
effective as earlier historians had main- 
tained. I think their argument is not 
conclusive. There is no doubt that his 
fame as the defender of popular educa- 
tion spread beyond Pennsylvania, for 
when he took his seat in the National 
House of Representatives for the first 
time in 1849, Horace Mann, the great 
educator, repeatedly voted for him for 
the speakership. 

Note his reply to the taxation argu- 
ment. "Many complain of the school 
tax, not so much on account of its 
amount, as because it is for the benefit 
of others and not themselves. This is a 
mistake. It is for their own benefit, in- 
asmuch as it perpetuates the government 
and ensures the due administration of 
the laws under which they live, and by 
which their lives and property are pro- 



tected. Why do they not argue the 
same objection against all other taxes? 
The industrious, thrifty, rich farmer 
pays a heavy county tax to support cri- 
minal courts, build jails, and pay sher- 
iffs and jail keepers, and yet probably 
he never has had and never will have 
any direct personal use for either. He 
never gets the worth of his money by 
being tried for a crime before the court, 
allowed the privilege of the jail on con- 
viction or receiving an equivalent from 
the sheriff or his hangmen officers! 

That Stevens realized that any one 
who voted to retain the law was placing 
his political future in jeopardy is evi- 
dent from the following quotation from 
his speech: "Let all therefore who would 
sustain the character of the philosopher 
or philanthropist, sustain this law. 
Those who would add thereto the glory 
of the hero can acquire it here, for in 
the present state of feeling in Pennsyl- 
vania I am willing to admit that but lit- 
tle less dangerous to the public man is 
the war club and battle axe of savage ig- 
( Continued on Page 4; Col. 2) 




IT COSTS BUT LITTLE 
To Telephone Home! 

Most pleasures cost money — some too much. 
No wonder home folks say "go easy" to sons 
at college. 

But you'll never (well — hardly ever) hear 
that warning when you telephone home. For 
Father and Mother the pleasure of hearing 
your voice far outweighs the trifling cost. 

After 8:30 P. M. (if you use Station to Sta- 
tion Service) you can telephone a hundred 
miles for 35 cents. What greater pleasure can 
such a small sum buy? A "voice visit" home 
is next best to being there ! 



PAII K NTS K N HO « S K 
ese SUGGESTIONS . , . 




Keep a regular telephone date with 11 Dine. 
Then you can count on the family heing 
there when you call. 

3et the "date" for after 8:30 P.M. to take 
advantage of the low Night Rates on Sta- 
tion to Station calls. 

Just give the Operator your home telephone 
number. 

Charlies may be reversed. 



T1IK BELL TELEPHONE COMPANY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

M — 5 



■ 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1934 



norance than to the Lion-hearted Rich- 
ard was the keen scimitar of the Sara- 
cen. He who would oppose it either 
through inability to comprehend the ad- 
vantages of general education, or from 
unwillingness to bestow them on all his 
fellow citizens even to the lowest and 
poorest, or from dread of popular ven- 
geance, seems to me to want either the 
head of the philosopher, the heart of 
the philanthropist or the nerve of the 
hero." 

The Act as revised in 1835 provided 
for a referendum in school district, and 
the fight was renewed in the local com- 
munities. So bitter wa s the opposition 
that families were divided on the issue, 
the son opposing the father, and neigh- 
bors, hitherto friendly, developed a life- 
long coldness or even bitter enmity^ The 
successors to Governor Wolfe addressed 
themselves to the task of organizing the 
system and enforcing its provisions. 

So beneficent have been the results of 
this legislation that it is believed that 
every college and public school in Penn- 
sylvania will introduce as a major part 
of its program for the year 1934 a cele- 
bration of the adoption of the Free 
School System. 

H. H. SHENK. 



CAGEMEN OPEN 1934 

BASKETBALL SEASON 

(Continued from Page One) 

for the crown with her team of veterans. 
In Barthold, ex-Shillington High lumi- 
nary, and "Bee" Rust, Lansdowne ace, 
as his runing mate, Mylin has a pair 
of forwards who are hard to beat. At 
center, Paul "Polly" Miller, a Lebanon 
lad, has replaced 
Bill Focht at the 
center position and 
is doing a splendid 
job in his position. 
Big Bill Rose, for- 
mer Trenton star, is 
giving Miller a run 
for his money at 
center. 

Veteran Guards 

With Capt. Max 
Light, former F. &C 
M. Academy man, 
and Bill Smith, of 
Trenton, N. J., at the guard posts, we 
find Mylin with one of the best-passing 
and smoothest - working combinations 
since the league was formed at his in- 
ception three years ago. 

Lineups: 

Lebanon Valley 




CAPT. LIGHT 



Barthold, f 8 

Rust, f 

Williams, f 

Miller, c ----- 2 

Rose, c 3 

Light, g -— — 

Smith, g 4 

C. Sponaugle, g 

Konsko, g , 



Total 



Drtfxel 



Wallace, f _ ..13 
Kline, f . - -- 4 



Hoff, c -- - 1 1 

Seaney, g 

Shinpis, g - — — 2 

Reynolds, g 3 2 

Totals J± - 14 9 

Referee: Barfoot. Umpire: S 
man. 'y 
Lineups: 



EASTERN PENNA. COLLEGE 
BASKETBALL LEAGUE 



Standing of the teams: 





W. 


L. 


Pet. 


Gettysburg - 


. 4 





1.000 


Lebanon Valley 


3 


1 


.750 


Albright — - 


2 


1 


.667 


Muhlenberg 


2 


2 


.500 


Franklin Si Marshall 


1 


2 


.333 


Drexel - 


1 


4 


.200 


Ursinus — 


. 


2 


.000 


Sat., Feb. 3 — Ursinus at 


Leb 


anon. 


Lebanon Valley 



FG FL Tot. 



Barthold, f 6 

Williams, f 

Rust, f 2 

Rose, c — 

Miller, c -- 3 

Konsko, g 

Light, g - - 2 

Smith, g 3 



Totals 16 

Franklin and Marshall 

FG FL Tot. 



Jacobs, f 5 

Moore, f - - 2 

Stouch, f 4 

Wenrich, c 

Yeager, c - 4 

Haller, g ----- 

Karvasales, g 1 



Total 16 4 36 

Referee: Borger. 
Lineup: 

Lebanon Valley 

FG FL Tot. 

Barthold, f 4 3 11 

Rust, f 2 4 

Rose, c -- -- 2 4 

Miller, c 

Williams, g 

Light, g 1 1 

B. Sponaugle, g 

Smith, g 15" 

Konsko, g 

Totals 9 9 27 

Gettysburg 

FG FL Tot. 



Dracha, f _ 3 

Kosma, f 

Cico, f 1 

Kitzmiller, f 1 

Howard, c 1 

Mac Millan, g 3 

Morris, g 2 

Olkewitz, g 1 



Totals 

Referee: Menton. 



.12 



28 



Tot. 


Lineup: 






19 


Lebanon Valley 









FG 


FL 


Tot. 





Barthold, f i 2 


3 


7 


4 


Patrizio, f 1 


1 


3 


4 


Williams, f -- 








1 


Rust, f 3 





6 


11 


Rose, c 1 





i 





Miller, c 1 


3 


5 


1 












Konsko, g 








42 


Light, g 










Smith, g - 2 





4 


Tot. 








5 


Totals .....10 


7 


27 


8 


Muhlenberg 






10 


FG 


FL 


Tot. 


1 


Rodgers, f 3 


3 


9 


3 


Blank, f ... 


1 


1 





Cuchrane, c 3 


1 


7 


2 


Weiner, g 








8 


Farris, g 2 





4 




Rosenarg, g _ 








37 


Sterner, g 


1 


1 


ugar- 










Totals . 8 


6 


22 



CAMPUS CUTS 



Referee: Julian. Umpire: Fischer, 



DoutrichX 



Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 



Operative S-47 reports suspicious ac- 
tions on the part of a hitherto-upright 
member of the varsity basketball team. 
It seems that Kosmeto Konsko, on a re- 
cent week-end visit, became enamored 
of the vivid vermilion fingernail polish 
used by his hostess. Georges, by nefari- 
ous means, secured an ample portion of 
the lady's private supply, and further 
modified his adapted digital strata lucida 
by painting them a screaming hue. The 
remains may still be viewed. 

Perhaps our George wants his hands 
to become easily-located targets during 
the season's basketball encounters. Feed 
him, team. 



The wintry blasts during the early 
part of the week held no terrors for 
certain popular damsels dwelling in 
North Hall. 

It was a particularly frigid night, 
when even the stentorian rumblings of 
the radiators produced little heating ef- 
fect. A quartet of young ladies, per- 
ceiving the inadequacy of their own 
flimsy "whimsies" in protecting against 
the cold, hit upon a brilliant idea. They 
procured from a kindly Sophomore four 
pair s of flannel pyjamas, donned them 
over aforesaid "whimsies," and retired 
to sleep the sleep of the just — -and re- 
sourceful. 

"Frozen ducks" from the Men's Dorm 
are said to be in the market for similar 
season-suited sleeping slacks. 



Lehman complains that every noon 
and evening he is faced anew by the 
problem of deciding who i s the champ. 
Better call it a two-way tie, Fred. Boys 
who can eat so manfully can occupy 
jointly and harmoniously the position 
of gastronomic supremacy. 



Enough of cryptic comments. The be- 
hemoths of mat mauling, popularly 
known as wrestlers, can take it — in a 
couple of ways. 

They tear themselves from slumber in 
the freezing hours of the dawn and 
stumble blindly forth upon the hills to 
do road-work. Messrs. Fridy, Todd, Buz- 
zell, et al, are developing such muscles 
and so great a fondness for spinach that 
future opponents of L. V. C. wrestlers 
had better take notice. A cynical "softy" 
observes that the boys always run the 
way the wind is blowing. 

But — the gong sounds — it i s the OLD 
SEER. 

(Editor's note: Although deluged 



SHAPIRO'S 

Qlothes for the 
W ?ll Dressed Man 

844 Cumberland St. 
LEBANON, PA. 




DINE and DANCE 

AT THE 

GREEN TERRACE 

ONE MILE EAST OF ANNVILLE 




WE INVITE 
L. V. C. 
STUDENTS 
TO TRY OUR 
DELICIOUS 
FOODS. 



with inquiries, the OLD SEER will not 
depart from his long-established rule of 
answering only one letter a week.. The 
old one receives his mail in the La Vie 
box in the library. You better make 
your questions good. 

O VENERABLE SEER: 

Whenever I go to preach in nearby 
churches, I ask a young lady to accom- 
pany me. Although she sometimes ac- 
cepts, she never will sing a "devotional 
solo." Now, as the ministers invite her 
to do so, I think it is meet and right that 
she should oblige. What can I do to 
transform a Business Ad. student into a 
singer of devotional solos? 

YRUBSA GOSPELLER. 

The Seer speaks: O Yrubsa, it is said 
that the soothing ministrations of Prof. 
Alexander Crawford are beneficial in 
this respect. Perhaps judicious applica- 
tion of nationally-advertised cough drops 
will prove helpful. At any rate, noctur- 
nal pilgrimages are not indicated. We 
regret that we cannot quote chapter and 
verse. 

THE OLD SEER. 



ASTOR 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA 



THURSDAY & FRIDAY 
VICTOR JORY - RENE BENTLEY 
IN 

SMOKY 



SATURDAY & MONDAY 

WITH 

Meet the Baron 

JACK PEARL JIMMY DURANTE 



TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY 

Footlight Parade 

dick powell ruby keeler 

JAMES CASNEY 
JOAN BLONDELL 



Best Short Attractions 



KREAMER BROS. 



EASY ELECTRIC WASHERS 
GAS STOVES AND RANGES 
RUGS AND LINOLEUMS 
PICTURE FRAMING 



Furniture - - Undertaking 

Phone 144 ANNVILLE. PA. 



SPECIAL CARDS 
SPECIAL STATIONERY 
and a SPECIAL WELCOME 

. . . at . . . 

BOLLMAN'S 

Book and Stationery Store 

33 S. 8th St. LEBANON, PA. 



Steve Wornas 

Hoffman Steam Pressing 
Keystone Hat Cleaning 

10 WEST MAIN STREET 
ANNVILLE, PA. 

H. W. MILLER 

Hardware of Quality 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

AtftPTEA CO, 

C. H. SHEARER, Mgr. 



GRIMM'S BOOK STORE 

SPECIAL 
CROWN SET 

CLIONIAN PINS--S12.00 



FOR QUALITY 

Baked Products 

PATRONIZE 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



20% DISCOUNT ON ALL MER- 
CHANDISE DURING FEBRUARY 

JOHN HIRSH 

DEPARTMENT STORE 
9-11 W. Main St. ANNVILLE 



D. L. Saylor & Sons 
CONTRACTORS 

LUMBER and COAL 
Annville, Pennsylvania 



Mauro D'Enno 

207 WEST MAIN STREET 
Mtfn's, Women's, Children's 
RUBBER HEELS - 25c 
Open every evening till eight o'clock 



SANDWICHES SODAS 

EAT AT ROEMIG'S 

DELICIOUS HOME-MADE 
ICE CREAM 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. B ASHORE 



LEBANON. PENNSYLVANIA 



THE PENNWAY 



Try Our Delicious Breakfasts 



sei 
'n 
wr. 
its 
of 
eit 
su 
spc 
spe 
] 

car 
U n 

Lea 

at 

no 



In 
1 

SI) 



T 

of j 

"in g 
tal | 
adv £ 

It 
*ho 
year 
Mali 
v ioii 

Li 
re Pu 
' n g, 
Her | 

Tl 

'His , 
s ev et 

So 'oi : 
«nd 




LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 




VOL. X 



ANNVILLE. PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1934 



No. 20 



Former Attache Of 
League Speaks To 
History Students 

d r. J. P. SALS AM IS GUEST 

Tells of Machinery of League 
Of Nations And Its 
Accomplishments 



:r- 

RY 



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no 

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dock 
)AS 



Dr. J. Paul Salsam visited the campus 
Wednesday afternoon, January 31. He 
was graduated from Franklin and Mar- 
shall in 1921, and received his Ph. D. 
from Princeton, writing his thesis on 
the Pennsylvania Constitution of 1776. 
Later he became instructor of Economics 
at Franklin and Marshall. 

Until recently he has been the head 
of the Publication Sales department of 
the League of Nations, Geneva. During 
the last three years he travelled twenty 
thousand miles through Europe and 
Asia Minor. Dr. Salsam is now in charge 
of C. W. A. work in locating and pre- 
serving manuscript material in local 
units in Pennsylvania under direction 
of the Pennsylvania Department of 
Archives. 

Two Official Languages 
During his visit, Dr. Salsam spoke to 
the modern European history class about 
the organization of the League of Na- 
tions. The official languages of the 
League are English and French. Every 
speech is interpreted immediately fol- 
lowing the original. This dual system 
seemingly prolongs the sessions, but dur- 
ing the second delivery, the members 
who understood the first address discuss 
its values, thus settling many questions 
of dispute. If the speakers cannot use 
either French or English, then he must 
supply his own interpreter, thus the 
speech is delivered three times — in the 
speaker's tongue, English, and French. 

Most of the work of the League is 
carried on by committees. Although the 
United States is not a member of the 
eague, that country has a representative 
at the disarmament committee, because 
no plans for disarmament could be 
drawn up without the consideration of 
(Continued on Page 3) 



Initial Recital of 
Year Given Tonight 

SI * STUDENTS WILL PLAY 



El ght-Year Old Daughter of Prof. 
Malsh Will Make Lebanon 
Valley Debut 

Th 

e Conservatory will present the first 
series of student recitals this eve- 
ta? 8 ' Thursda y. February 8. The reci- 

ad v Pr ° mises to be a s P lendid treat- . onl V 

T 3nced students will appear. 
Irt adrl' 

wh . tlon to the college students 

year" PUy ' Caro1 MaIsh ' the ei S ht ' 
old daughter of Professor and Mrs. 
sh < u . , 

narnsburg, will play several 



Mai 
Vi ° lln 



re Putati 0l , c I i ~~ " 

'Hp . " er splendid violin play- 

, g » and hp,- , 

he r fj appearance this evening — 

""will b ° n ^ ebanon Valley campus 

Th e 6 ? touch interest to everyone. 

^is re . other musicians who will be in 

seve^' are Eth *' Keller, who will play 

£ oloi st . ^ 8an solos ; Dale Roth, tenor 

3ncl M; ° Crt Sn eirer, bassoon soloist, 
"sses 1U 

Gr Mar g«ret Early, Ruth Buck 
lN augle, pianists. 



^ ttle Mi ss Malsh h 



as earned a wide 



Prof. J. R. Howe To 
Speak On Campus 

On Sunday and Monday, J. Ruskin 
Howe, a professor of systematic the- 
ology, will be on the campus. He will 
speak at the college church in the 
morning; Sunday evening he will 
meet the Christian associations. 

At a special meeting in the dining 
hall, Dr. Howe will address the Life 
Work Recruits. Dr. Howe will be 
glad to interview the students who 
are interested in the campus religious 
activities. 



Dr Lietzau Speaks 
At Friendly Hour 

LIFE IN GREECE CITED 



Professor of German Compares 
American Education With 
That In Other Lands 



A program of real interest and value 
was offered to the girls of the college at 
Friendly Hour on Sunday evening when 
Miss Lietzau was presented as the speak- 
er. Previous to the talk the devotions 
were conducted by Margaret Longeneck- 
er and Kathryn Mowrey. Helen Summy 
sang very beautifully "Jesus, Lover of 
My Soul."' 

Foreign Teachers Better Prepared 

Miss Lietzau, drawing largely from 
her own experience as teacher in a school 
in Greece, told of the place held by 
American education in foreign coun- 
tries. On the whole, the standards for 
teachers in foreign schools are higher 
than in schools training along the same 
line in our own country.. Most of the 
teachers hold advanced degrees. 

The majority of the schools in for- 
eign countries have as their chief aim 
the Christianizing of the people. The 
speaker related the story of one man 
who, when hired, wished to introduce 
the study of agriculture. When denied 
the privilege he withdrew and established 
his own system. This man believed what 
seems to be the approaching popular 
ideal that first well-nourished healthy 
bodies are needed, the people must be 
taught how to live, and then religion 
can be stressed. The old plan was to 
change the natives to conform with the 
plan of Christianity and doctrine; now 
the chief idea is to adapt the religion to 
suit the needs of the people. 

Knives "Needed" 

In Greece, Miss Lietzau stated, one of 
the greatest problems is the tremendous 
race prejudice. The students at the 
school can never cease to marvel at the 
fairness of the American teachers and 
their seemingly utter lack of race con- 
sciousness. A particular hatred exists be- 
tween the Balkan people and the Greeks. 
Numerous incidents were related to show 
(Continued on Page 3; Col. 2) 



STUDENT CONDUCTORS USE 
CHAPEL AS LABORATORY 



The class of conducting taught in the 
conservatory by Professor Rutledge has, 
as a practical project, the actual con- 
ducting of group singing, which they 
have begun this week. Each member of 
the class will lead the chapel singing for 
a period of one week. This week Robert 
C. Heath is very successfully taking 
charge of the singing of the morning 
hymns. 



Biology Assistants 

Guests of Dr. Light 

On Friday evening, February 2, three 
biology assistants, Luke Remley, Gerald 
Russell and Robert Cassel, were privi- 
leged to spend a few hours in the cheer- 
ful abode of Dr. V. Earl Light, pro- 
fessor of biology. 

Mrs. Light prepared a delectable din- 
ner and Prof. Light topped it with ice 
cream of his own manufacture. The 
children supplied a,n unceasing cheer. 
Following dinner, Mr. Remley was act- 
ing father to one of the little girls, and 
carried her about in his arms. After in- 
specting the house from the cellar, where 
one may find in a cold room a row of 
sweet-smelling sugar-cured hams, to the 
attic, the guests engaged in playing 
rummy. So many were playing that two 
decks of cards were used. Prof. Light 
at last won his first game, though it took 
him all evening. It was not easy to re- 
main without a minus score, since the 
younger players could think remarkably 
fast. 

The guests finally dispersed with mem- 
ories of an evening happily spent. 



Johnson Is Elected 
Anniversary Leader 
Of PhiJokosmians 



COMMITTEES APPOINTED 



Philos Prepare For Sixty-seventh 
Birthday And Joint 
Play With Clio 



The Philokosmian Literary Society 
conferred the highest honors of the so- 
ciety upon Ray Bjf Johnson when he was 
elected anniversary president at a spe- 
cial meeting last Friday noon. Mr. 
Johnson's election is a reward of^faith- 
ful services rendered the society during 
hi s two years on the campus, and also 
reflects the esteem and popular favor in 
which his associates hold him. His elec- 
tion is the first' step in building up a 
program for the sixty-seventh birthday 
of Philo, the oldest society on the camp- 
us, which will be celebrated Friday and 
Saturday, May 4 and 5. 
Preliminary plans for these two dates 
call for a play to be given jointly with 
Clio on Friday evening, and the annual 
(Continued on Page 2; Col. 3) 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



Thursday, February 8 — Recital in 
Engle Hall. Green Blotter Club 
meeting. 

Saturday, February 10 — Gettysburg 
vs. L. V. at Lebanon High School. 

Sunday, February 1 1 — "Y. M." and 
"Y. W." meetings at 5:45 P.M. 

Monday, February 12 — College or- 
:hestra practice at 3:30 P.M. 
Band practice at 7:00 P.M. 

Wednesday, February 14 — Band prac- 
tice at 7:00 P.M. Albright vs. L. 
/. at Reading.. | 

L lursday, February 15 — Little Sym- 
pi- .y at 3:30 P.M. Debate with 
Fairmont State Teachers College in 
Philo Hall. 

Saturday, February 17 — Twelfth an- 
niversary Delphian Literary Soci- 
ty. Dickinson vs. L. V. at Car- 
isle. 



Bigler Leads In 

"Y" Vesper Service 



A group of young men met in the 
"Y" room of the dormitory for the 
Vesper service on Sunday evening, 
February 4. The meeting was con- 
ducted by Ray Johnson, whose part 
of the service was the reading of the 
scripture lesson with a few comments. 

Adam Bigler contributed to the 
service by leading in the devotional 
prayer. The temainder of the time 
was employed in the singing of songs 
selected by the group. 



L.y. Ready to Open 
Season of Debating 

NEGATIVE DEBATES FIRST 



N. R. A. Question To Be Argued- 
Debates With Old Rivals 
Already Scheduled 



Lebanon Valley College will open its 
debating season next Thursday evening, 
February 15, entertaining the affirma- 
tive team of Fairmont State Teachers 
College, Fairmont, West Virginia, on 
this particular occasion. The debate is 
one of the several scheduled by the 
West Virginia school during a tour of 
eastern Pennsylvania, and consequently 
it will be only a single debate. The de- 
bate will probably be held in Philo Hall, 
depending upon completion of the 
painting and redecorating project. De- 
finite announcement of the time and 
place will be made in next week's La Vie. 

Members of the affirmative and nega- 
tive men's teams have had several meet- 
ings lately and are at present working 
upon a definite method of attack in their 
speeches. Their material is practically 
unlimited since the question concerns 
the N. R. A. and reads, Resolved: That 
the essential features of the N. R. A. be 
adopted as the permanent policies of the 
United States government. The subject 
is certainly a very modern one, and one 
which can be understood by every audi- 
ence. Popular interest in the subject, it 
is hoped, will bring forth large audi- 
ences at every debate. 

Debates have been definitely scheduled 
for the following dates: February 27 
Lincoln University, dual debate; March 
14, Gettysburg, at home, and March 21, 
Gettysburg, away; March 15, Westmin- 
ster, at home; April 5, University of 
Pennsylvania, at home. Dual debates 
with Western Maryland, Elizabethtown 
College, Muhlenberg and Millersville 
State Teachers College are awaiting veri- 
fication. 

For its first debate Lebanon Valley 
will be represented against Fairmont 
Teachers by the negative team composed 
of Robert Womer, Calvin Reber, Jack 
Morris, and William Earnest. The prob- 
able debaters for the affirmative of Leb- 
anon Valley in their first debate will be 
Allen Buzzell, Ray Johnson, and Ed- 
mund Umberger. 



JUNIORS ENTERTAINED AT 
NORTH HALL TEA BY "Y" 



The Y. W. C. A. entertained the 
Junior members of the organization at 
tea in North Hall parlor Tuesday after- 
noon, February 6. Margaret Weaver 
was hostess at this function. Mrs. Wal- 
lace and Mrs. Green poured. The fresh- 
man "Y" cabinet, of which Martha 
Faust is president, helped with the pre- 
parations and poured. 



Basketballers Beat 
Ursinus for Second 
Position in League 

WINNING SCORE IS 34-32 



Freshmen Also Win, Defeating 
St. Paul's By Score 
Of 47-41 



Coming up fast in the closing min- 
utes of play, Hooks Mylin's Flying 
Dutchmen nosed out the Ursinus Bears 
in Lebanon on Saturday night by a hair, 
winning 34-32, and hence strengthening 
their hold on second place in the East- 
ern Pennsylvania Collegiate loop, and 
jumping within a half game of the 
league leading Gettysburg Bullets. 

It was this second half rally by the 
Blue and White which finally turned the 
tables in favor of the homesters. With 
Ursinus playing a brand of basketball 
that did not seem altogether proper for 
a team in the cellar position, Lebanon 
Valley could not get going, and after 
hectic struggling or, we might say, bat- 
tling through the first twenty minutes of 
play, found themselves on the short end 
of a 22 to 16 score. 

Another Rally 
However, in the second half the Val- 
ley seemed to "come to" and rallied to 
take the lead 26 to 25 with about eight 
minutes of play .remaining in tho final 
period. A couple of field goals by "Bee" 
Rust, Blue and White forward, increased 
the Leb anon Valley lead and made vic- 
tory certain for the Flying Dutchmen. 
"Horse" Chase's Bears showed a 
complete reversal of form in this 
contest and certainly did not look 
like tail-enders. Johnson, big Bear 
Jivot man, and Breish, star for- 
ward, were the outstanding drib- 
blers for the Collegeville clan. 
Johnson wa s high scorer of the game 
with 14 points. Breisch had 11, tying 
with Barthold, who kept up his high 
scoring antics for the Lebanon Valley 
team. 

Barthold High Scorer 

Besides Barthold's scoring, the Leba- 
non Valley cause was heightened by the 

(Continued on Page 3 



29 Honor Students 
For First Semester 



FOUR FROSH MAKE GRADE 



Three Students Earn Straight "A's" 
— Seniors Place Greatest 
Number 



Twenty-nine students attained the ave- 
rage of 90 per cent in their first semes- 
ter grades that will enable them to have 
"cut exemptions" during the coming 
semester.. 

The registrar's office today an- 
nounced that eleven seniors, six juniors, 
eight sophomores, and four freshmen 
have attained the mark which is equiva- 
lent to an average letter grade midway 
between A minus and B plus. 

In computing the marks, A is counted 
95, A minu s 92, B plus 88, B 85, B 
minus 82, C plus 78, C 75, C minus 72, 
and so forth. Each grade is multiplied 
by the number of hours credit for one 
semester in the course in which it was 
made, results are added and the total di- 
vided by the number of hours carried. 
On this basis, a mark of 95 is equal to a 
(Continued on Page 2; Col. 3) 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1934 



Ha Viz Collegtenne 



ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Edmund Umberger, '34 .. .Editor-in-Chief 
Kathryn Mowrey, '34. .. .Associate Editor 
Richard Schreiber, '34 . .Managing Editor 
Richard Baus. '37 1 Asst. Man. Editor 

REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Martha Kreider, '34 
Allan Ranck, '34 
Elizabeth Schaak, '34 
Helen Earnest, '35 
Sylvia Evelev, '36 

David Yake, '36 General Reporters 

Christine Gruber, '34 Conservatory 

DeWitt Essick, '34 

George Hiltner, '35 Athletics 

Catherine Wagner, '35 Alumni 

Clyde Mentzer, '34 Philokosmian 

Robert Cassel, '36 Kalozetean 

Jane Shellenberger, '36 Clionian 

Marietta Ossl, *35 Delphian 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Jack Todd, '34 Business Manager 

Kenneth Sheaffer, '35. Asst. Bus. Manager 
Allen Buzzell, '34. . .Circulation Manager 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 



this school is 8. 

The offering which was given is to be 
donated to the college as a contribution 
from Trinity United Brethren church. 



Miss Kathryn Leisey, '33, who attend- 
ed Millersville State Normal School last 
semester, is substituting for the art in- 
structor at Harding Junior High School, 
Lebanon. 



Single Copies 5 cents 

Subscription $1.00 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter, under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



THURSDAY, FEB. 8, 1934 



AND THEN? 



At the completion of four years of 
college, a great course of study is fin- 
ished for some of us. For others, the 
years of study are just beginning. Many 
who have completed their formal educa- 
tion with a college degree find that they 
do not continue to study without a di- 
rected course. How can we as college 
students prepare to continue our study 
after graduation? 

There is one unit of this institution 
which we find repeated in almost every 
community — the library. If we learn 
how to use the college library, we can 
study, with direction, in any place. We 
shall find many old friends in the library 
if we just know where to look for them. 
Much of the work of college is refer- 
ence. When we graduate, all our study 
will be in the form of reference. No 
student should finish four years of col- 
lege work without making use of the 
privilege of learning a little library sci- 
ence. This knowledge can be used any- 
where no matter how far one travels 
from his alma mater. 



Rev. Harry M. Tobias and Miss Ethel 
Miller of Tremont were married Febru- 
ary 3, 1934. The ceremony was per- 
formed at Tremont United Brethren 
church by Rev. Dr. S. C. Enck, the su- 
perintendent of the East Pennsylvania 
Conference. Rev. Tobias is a son of 
Mr. and Mrs. William Tobia s of north- 
west Myerstown. He is at present a stu- 
dent at the Evangelical School of The- 
ology, at Reading, and is also engaged 
in preaching in the United Brethren 
churches at Brickerville and Newtown. 
Rev. Tobias is a graduate of Lebanon 
Valley College, class of '33. 



Mis s Edna Gorski, '27, became the 
bride of Henry Janowski, of Garfield, 
New Jersey, on January 6, 1934. Miss 
Garski is a graduate of Lebanon Valley 
College, '27. Mr. Janowski is a lawyer. 




BEYOND t CAMPUS 



Dr. J. Calabrese, physicians of St. 
Mary's Hospital, Passaic, New Jersey, 
has been elected president of the Carl 
Fortsmann Memorial Foundation Uni- 
versity Club. Dr. Calabrese is a gradu- 
ate of Lebanon Valley College, '27. 



Dr. Francis Benedict, director of the 
Nutrition Laboratory of Carnegie Insti- 
tute of Washington, blasted the old be- 
lief that the sedentary professor needs 
special diet for mental activity. A house- 
maid engaged in sweeping and dusting 
the study of a college professor would 
expend as much extra energy in three 
minutes as the professor would use up, 
in excess of his basic needs, during an 
hour of intensive work at his works. 
Cannot this research be applied to stu- 
dents also? Perhaps by these means we 
can explain the need for physical edu- 
cation in our Lebanon Valley College 
curriculum. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



K. Luella Hertzler of Lancaster, Pa., 
Conservatory graduate of 1916, spent 
the past summer in study in Paris. Her 
European scholarship afforded instruc- 
tion under artists of the French capitol, 
such as Isador Philippe, at the famous 
Palace of Fontainbleau, Cortot of the 
Paris Conservatory, and Madame Lan- 
dowska, world renowned) pianist and 
harpsichordist. 



On February 4, 1934, Dr. A. Richie 
delivered an address to the congrega- 
tion of Trinity United Brethren church, 
Lebanon. During the service various an- 
nouncements concerning the work of the 
church were made. Special metion was 
given to the number of college gradu- 
ates who hold active membership in this 
church. The total number of college 
graduates in the church membership is 
69. Of this number 54 are Lebanon Val- 
ley College graduates. The Lebanon 
Valley Conservatory is also well repre- 
sented. The number of graduates from 



Four Saints in Three Acts, an opera 
composed by Gertrude Stein of Califor- 
nia, is to be cast with negro singers. 
They do not know what the words mean 
and do not care. They like the mystery 
of unintelligibility and speak their parts 
clearly. Mr. Thomson of Missouri, a de- 
votee to the extreme modernist school, 
chose these singers after having been 
impressed by their fine diction in negro 
night clubs. He is confident that these 
negroes will handle the music better than 
whites. 



John Hyman, one of the best theatri- 
cal costumers, claims that savages the 
world over have one characteristic in 
common — a strong dislike for covering 
their legs. Another racket for depres- 
sion days is the exporting industry of 
second-hand stage finery. It is a queer 
but profitable one. In case you take a 
trip to the South Seas and see some 
muddy native in a former Lebanon Val- 
ley dramatic creation, do not be sur- 
prised but instead glow with pride to 
think of our international advertising. 
The majority of these natives do not pay 
for their costumes with actual money be- 
cause of its scarcity in their country too; 
instead, they trade rubber, palmoil and 
ivory for the coveted articles. In Africa, 
Siam, the islands of the Malay Penin- 
sula, and the Australian "bush" this 
business is being carried day by day far- 
ther afield. 



PHILO PRESIDENT 




FRESHMAN THEME 



MAN OVERBOARD 



RAY JOHNSON 
Who recently was elected anniversary 
president of Philokosmian Literary So- 
ciety. The sixty-seventh birthday of this 
men's organization will be observed on 
May 4 and 5. 



RAY JOHNSON ELECTED 
PHILO ANNIVERSARY HEAD 



(Continued from Page One) 



society dance on Saturday evening. This 
year's anniversary will be somewhat dif- 
ferent since Philo and Clio are combin- 
ing in producing the play, where pre- 
viously it was strictly a society affair. 
However, the dance will be under sole 
sponsorship of the men's society. All in 
all, the anniversary promises to be one 
of the best in many years. 

The anniversary president has ap- 
pointed several committees to make the 
necessary arrangements, and these, sub- 
ject to change or addition, are as fol- 
lows: 

Play— McFaul, Hiltner. 
Dance — Essick, Lloyd, Shaeffer. 
Costume — Mentzer, Roth, Magee. 
Favor — Whisler, Baugher, Slaybaugh. 
Program — Ranck, Schreiber, Prescott. 
Properties — Jordan, Grove, Schmuck. 
Decoration — Steffy, Underwood, Wal- 
born. 

Refreshment — Zech, Krone, Harnish. 



29 HONOR STUDENTS 

FOR FIRST SEMESTER 



(Continued from Page One) 



perfect record of "straight A." This 
average wa s attained by three students, 
two juniors and a sophomore 
Honor Students — Close of 1st Semester 

1933—1934 

Adams, Claire — 90.23 

Early, Margaret 90.50 

Earnest, William -91.75 

Etter, Robert -. 95.00 

Evans, David 90.94 

Evelev, Sylvia 91.44 

Fasnacht, Emma - 93.12 

Flocken, Karl 91.43 

Gillan, Louise - 90.22 

Grimm, Henry 95.00 

Groff, Mary 90.40 

Grove, Dwight 90.05 

Heckman, Catherine 93.46 
Hostetter, Mark 93.59 
Kauffman, Mary 90.55 

Kinney, Charles - 9182 

Leisey, Marian 95.00 
Light, John 93.89 

Long, Theodore 93.23 

Metzger, Bruce 93.94 

Mowrey, Kathryn 93.87 
Ranck, Allan 90.00 
Roth, Dale 90.01 
Shank, Wilbur 91.94 
Shroff, Winona 93.33 
Umberger, Edmund 92.88 
Weirick, Charlotte 90.68 
Womer, Robert 93.50 
Zech, John 90.28 



We were aboard the transport Chau- 
mont, somewhere in the Yellow sea. The 
cold December gale had blown steadily 
for two days, and as a result the waves 
were gigantic. The great ship rolled ter 
rifyingly from side to side and pitched 
with unusual violence. As all the routine 
formations had been dismissed, the ma 
rines on board, of whom I was one, were 
free to do as they pleased for the re 
mainder of the afternoon. Most of them 
were on the after well deck because there 
the superstructure of the ship served as 
a shield against the cold, raw wind. They 
crouched or lay in the nooks between 
the winches and hatchways, or wherever 
they could find the most shelter. I had 
discovered a quiet retreat between the 
forward hatch and the poop deck bulk- 
head and was lying there, wrapped in a 
heavy blanket. I think I had even cov 
ered up my head because of the bitter 
cold. 

I must have been asleep, or nearly so, 
when I was aroused with a start by sud- 
den shouting and a general commotion 
all around me. Everyone seemed to be 
scrambling toward the after part of the 
ship. The violence of the noise dazed 
me, then stark fear surged through me 
and seemed for a moment to paralyze 
my entire body as the increasing clamor 
resolved itself into a thundering rhythm, 
fearfully distinct: "Man overboard! 
Man overboard!" 

Throwing the blanket off my head I 
saw immediately that everyone was run- 
ning aft and climbing to the poop deck 
to obtain a view of the unlucky chap. I 
could not at once reconcile my thoughts 
to the situation. Just a moment before, 
all had been quiet except for the whist- 
ling of the wind through the lines and 
cables of the ship, and the low, monoto- 
nous roar of the ocean. But these very 
familiar sounds were now hushed amid 
the frantic shouts of "Man overboard! 
Man overboard!" 

That cry carries with it a note of 
frenzy — a note that can be heard only 
in times when circumstances have be- 
come suddenly desperate. I had sensed 
something of the sort' on two occasions 
before: once when a launch in which I 
was a passenger collided with a Chinese 
lumber barge during a storm on the 
treacherous Hwang-poo river, and once 
when I was awakened at midnight in 
the Nicaraguan jungle by the sudden, 
screaming notes of "The call to arms." 
But both of these incidents had occurred 
in the night, when it was pitch dark. 
Darkness always adds to fear! Here was 
a man overboard in a dangerous sea in 
broad daylight. The thought that in a 
moment I was to see him in his dread- 
ful predicament — perhaps to watch him 
drown, made the situation immeasurably 
more dreadful. My spirit revolted at the 
picture in my mind — I shrank from it. 

With an effort I cast these thoughts 
aside, clamored to the poop deck, and 
elbowed my way into the excited crowd 
that was rapidly forming there. One 
dreadful fear now hammered at my 
brain: perhaps the poor fellow our there 
in the cold water was one of my own 
buddies! Maybe it was Lawers, or Pat- 
terson, or Vasko! Everybody was ask- 
ing everybody else who the man was, but 
no one seemed f o know. 

The ground swells were unusually 
heavy. On the crest of one of these 
mountainous waves we beheld, for a mo- 
ment, a man swimming. He was in plain 
view. For an instant we saw him, fight- 
ing frantically, but as the swell receded, 
a wave broke over him so that he was 
lost from our view. A moment later he 
appeared again, only to become en- 
gulfed once more under an avalanche 
of water as a giant wave roared down 
upon him. He could make no headway. 
In the wake of the ship, bobbing up and 
down on the waves, were several life pre- 
servers which someone had thrown to- 
ward him, but even if he could have seen 
then from his unfortunate position 



among the waves, he would not have 
been able to swim to them, because f 
the rough sea. 

Suddenly the ship listed heavily t _ 
ward the port side as the helsman began 
to swing her around. The cry of "Man 
overboard!" had been relayed to the 
bridge, where the officer on watch had 
ordered the man at the wheel to turn 
the ship sharply to starboard. At the 
ame time the force in the engine room 
was signalled to shut off all power. 

The life boat crew was already a t 
work. The boatswain's mate in charge 
of the crew roughly backed his com- 
mands, and lent a hand to help steady 
the boat as it was swung into position 
over the side. The members of the crew 
eemed calmly to be paying attention to 
orders. They acted with utmost alacrity 
and precision, not one of them turning 
hi 1 ! head to watch the struggles of the 
'nfcrtunate man now nearly two hun- 
dred yards away from the ship. Buck- 
ling their life belts about them, they 
took their stations in the boat, seeming- 
ly unmindful of the danger involved in 
the process of lowering it in such rough 
water. 

The poor man seemed fearfully dis- 
tant now, but he could still be seen occa- 
sionally, swimming with long, steady 
strokes. The water looked cold — cold 
enough to freeze, but the man kept 
swimming! He must have been strong 
indeed. Someone said that he was a 
sailor, and that he had jumped over- 
board with the intention of committing 
suicide. If that were true, he must have 
changed his mind after striking the wa- 
ter, because he was certainly putting up 
a valiant fight to save himself! Tragedy 
though it was, I felt somewhat relieved 
to learn that it was no intimate friend 
of mine whose life was being slowly ex- 
tinguished by the cruel, remorseless 
ocean. He was still visible now and then 
as some gigantic wave bore him up, but 
his efforts appeared to be less vigorous 
than at first. It was apparent that his 
strength was ebbing swiftly. 

As the ship drifted around in a great 
circ'° we could plainly feel a vibration 
caused by the change of direction. It 
seemed a s though the great steel heart 
of the ship herself were shuddering at 
the gruesome sight. 

The dauntless swimmer grew weaker 
and weaker, until finally he fought only 
with the recklessness of despair — then 
his motions ceased entirely. We could 
see his head and arm s in the water as 
we drifted close to him. The propellors 
were reversed, and as the ship came to a 
halt the life boat was lowered. The 
crew cast off. and rowed with much dif- 
ficulty to the spot where the motionless 
body was floating.. 

All was quiet once more, except for 
th" wind and the low roar of the waves. 
Grim tragedy hung over the ship like a 
cloud. Shivering, partly on account or 
*he cold, and partly because of the nerv- 
ous reaction which was the result of our 
v>itnessing the life and death struggles of 
the man overboard, we looked on 10 
silence as they brought the cold, drip' 
ping body aboard. The chief doctor ap- 
plied artificial respiration in an attemP 1 
to resuscitate him, but it was too late 
the man was dead. 

Had the sky been blue rather tha n 
grev — had the weather been pleasant 
rather than cold, and had the sea bee 
calm and peaceful rather than vicious 
the scene would not have left so ghastly 
an imprint on my mind. I can think 
no more hopeless a picture than the P lC 
ture of a man striving in desperation 1 
save himself in the face of such rele ot 
less and overwhelming odds. Never 
fore had the sea appeared so cold s ° 
treacherous. It seemed to be alive, k ut 
lacking any vestige of conscience, 
made me feel a s though I were a tre 
passer on the deep, and that this 1,111 
derous gesture was a challenge to 
The vision of that unfortunate wretch , " 1 
the wake of the Chaumont frantic 3 
fighting to keep from drowning will P e 
st-nt itself each time my thoughts txX * fl 
to the Yellow sea. 

LOUIS STRAL 10 ' 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1934 



PAGE THREE 



have 

use Q f 



ily to- 

be gan 
"Man 
; o the 
h had 
) turn 
the 
room 

'dy at 
charge 

com- 

steady 
asition 
e crew 
ion to 
lacrity 
lrning 
of the 
1 hun- 
Buck- 
. they 
'ming- 
led in 
rough 

y dis- 

occa- 
steady 
-cold 
kept 
strong 
.vas a 

over- 
titting 

have 
e wa- 
ve; up 
agedy 
lieved 
riend 
!y ex- 
seless 

then 
i, but 
orous 
X his 

great 
ation 
i. It 
heart 
ig at 

eaker 
only 
-then 
could 
er as 
ellors 
• to a 
The 
h dif 
onless 

>r for 
^aves. 
like a 
int of 

nerv- 
>f our 
rles of 
on i n 

drip" 
or ap' 
tternp c 
late— 

tha" 
easant 
, bee" 1 
icious. 
ghastly 
ink o f 
ie P iC ' 



ion 



to 



rele^' 
ret he- 
ld—* 
-e, b ut 
ce. * 
a tre 5 ' 
s mu"" 
to 

,tch 

ill P" c ' 
» tur" 



president Lynch Has 
Busy Schedule Ahead 

Since the holidays, President Lynch 
has had numerous engagements to speak 
and to attend conferences. On January 
7 ; he preached at the Colonial Park 
United Brethren Church. The same 
^eek he attended the meeting of the 
Lebanon County Medical Society. The 
week of January 15, the Association of 
American Colleges met in St. Louis. The 
Association of College Presidents also 
met last month in the Penn Harris hotel 
in Harrisburg. On January 31, Dr. 
Lynch spoke at the Christian Endeavor 
anniversary service in Otterbein church, 
Lancaster. On February 4, he delivered 
the message for the same occasion at the 
United Brethren church in Shiremans- 
town. On Sunday he will attend the 
services at the Highspire church and at 
the Harrisburg State Street church. On 
Monday, Dr. Lynch will go to Dayton 
Ohio, where the Board of Christian Edu 
cation and the Board of Administration 
will convene. 



BASKETBALL TEAM WINS 

FROM URSINUS BEARS 



(Continued from Page One) 



SPORT_SHOTS 

It seem s as though that second half 
rally which thrilled so many of us dur- 
ing the football season is going to be- 
come a part of the basketball season too. 
The boys showed a determination to win 
Saturday night despite the fact that they 
were apparently off color, and the oppo- 
sition seemed unusually aggressive. The 
Bears presented a surprisingly strong of- 
fensive attack, and those who saw the 
game will testify that it was that ever- 
prevalent never-say-die spirit which 
brought home the bacon for the locals. 
Maybe the second half rally which per- 
vaded the evening fracas came because 
the game took on a rather pugilistic and 
somewhat "footballish" aspect toward 
the end. 



Lebanon Valley now has four victor- 
ies to it s credit, and has met every other 
team in the league except Albright. If 
the boys are able to eke out a victory 
over the Gettysburg Bullets on Saturday 
at Lebanon, we'll • see the team perched 
right on the top step of the league lad- 
der. Every real Lebanon Valley rooter 
should feel it his duty to be in Lebanon 
for this crucial game which will more 
than likely decide whether or not the 
Mylinmen have good chances of annex- 
ln g their first Collegiate Basketball 
championship. 



playing of "Bee" Rust at forward, Capt. 
Max Light and big Bill Smith at guards. 
This quartet starred for the Blue and 
White. 

In the preliminary tilt, Lebanon Val- 
ley's Freshman quintet had a hard time 
in disposing of St. Paul's of the East 
Pennsylvania Evangelical League by a 
47-41 score. 

Lineups: 

Lebanon Valley 
G 

Barthold, f 

Rust, f . 

Patrizio, f 

Miller, c-f 

Rose, c 

Light, g 

Williams, g 



This next item probably belongs to 
another column, but since it concerns 
our general subject, it probably won't 
^e altogether inappropriate. It seem s as 
though one of the more considerate 
damsels of our student body recently 
P'tied our poor, underfed athletes, and, 
w hen having been presented with her 
daily half pint of milk, she most earn- 
est ^y asked that her share be given to 
°ne of the football men. That's my idea 
of the "milk f human kindness." What 
sa V. Shakespea re r 



Last but not least, the Freshman var- 
u y needs some commendation for their 
P er formance on Saturday night. The 
r osh drew their first blood, and look as 
0u gh they are making steady improve- 
ent - Here's hoping the recent win will 
Prove . . 

in incentive to more victories 

over f, 



come 
Snell 
8am e 



uture rivals, and that the only out- 
ma y be smiling results. Billett and 
'*» particular, play a good, fast 



and are aure to give trouble to 

and C Val W ' th the ' r scorin 8 abili£ y- S P e g 
rr,en r °°k 3re two outstancun g defense 
p fo .° tne yearling squad. Get 'em, 



yo^ lniSter (calling)— "And what does 
be en mot her do for you when you've 

Ma r \r d . 8iri? " 

fr 0r _ , ry She lets me stay home 
m church." 



Smith, g 4 

Totals 1 2 

Ursinus 

G. 

Sommers, f 1 

Gauner, f 1 

Breisch, f 5 

Greenawalt, f 

Johnson, c 6 

Price, c 

Calvert, g __ 

Smith, g _.. 1 

Covert, g _ 

Davidson, g 

Totals 14 

Referee — Borger, Lancaster. 

L. V. C. Frosh 
G. 

Kinney, f 4 

Donmoyer, f 2 

Billet, c ___ 5 

Speg, g 1 

Snell, g 3 

Crook, g 1 

Massimer, g 1 

Totals 17 

G. 

St. Paul's 

Klett, f 6 

Lorah, f :. 6 

Ohlinger, c ~~ _ 2 

Miller, c 

Kiscadden, g 

Whitman, g 1 

Erdman, g ..... 

Totals 15 

Referee — Moyer, Lebanon. 



Blue Belles Snare 
Win From Juniata 



18 TO 17 IS THE FINAL SCORE 



Krebs High Scorer As Weirick 
Sisters Hold Huntingdon 
Forwards In Check 



10 

F. 


1 

2 

1 






F. 
3 
2 
4 

4 



13 

F. 

3 
4 
1 

2 
1 




34 

T. 
2 
2 

11 


14 

1 
2 



3 2 



T. 
11 

6 
14 

2 
10 

2 

2 

47 
T. 

15 
16 

5 

2 
3 




11 41 



MISS LIETZAU SPEAKS 

AT FRIENDLY HOUR 



(Continued from Page One) 



the extremes that exist. A Bulgarian boy 
in the school was found to have a large 
knife concealed under his pillow. When 
questioned, he declared that he would 
not dare remain under the same roof 
with Greeks without having some means 
of protection. At another time a Greek 
teacher had to be dismissed for her 
treatment of the Bulgarian children. 



LEAGUE STANDING 

Monday, February 5, 1934 

W. L. Pet. 

Gettysburg 4 1.000 

Lebanon Valley . 4 1 .800 

Albright 2 1 .667 

Muhlenberg 3 3 .500 

F. 6c M 1 3 .250 

Drexel I. 1 4 .200 

Ursinus 3 .000 

Saturday's Scores 

Lebanon Valley 34;Ursinus 32; 
Muhlenberg 35; F. & M. 31. 

This Week's Schedule 

Tuesday — Drexel at Ursinus. 

Wednesday — F. &C M. at Albright. 

Saturday — Gettysburg at Lebanon 
Valley. F. fld M. at Ursinus. Muh- 
lenberg at Albright. 



The L. V. C. Blue Belles for the third 
time stormed the citadel of the Juniata 
basketball lassies at Huntingdon last 
Saturday, and at last emerged with a vic- 
tory by the close score of 18 to 17. 

As the score indicates, the game was 
close throughout. Anna Krebs, stellar 
varsity forward, was high scorer for the 
Blue and White, netting 15 of the Belles' 
18 points. The success of the girls, 
which, by the way, started the winning 
streak for Lebanon Valley teams on Sat- 
urday, was due in a great measure to the 
clever passing of the centers and the 
closeness with which the guards watched 
the opposing forwards. 

Coach Kenyon's forces will have an- 
other opportunity to demonstrate their 
superiority when they meet Juniata in a 
return match on the Annville high 
school floor next Saturday afternoon. 

Lineup: 

Juniata (17) L. V. C. (18) 

M. Payne ... R. Forward .... G. Gemmill 
P. Kaufman L. Forward A. Krebs 

N. Ranck Center A. Orth 

C. Fleck S. Center M. Chamberlain 

B. Wilson .... R. Guard C. Weirick 

Greenwood L. Guard J. Weirick 

Referee: Mary Ann Rupp. 

Score at half: L. V. C. 8; Juniata 5^ 




Ricker (as they drove along a lonely 
road) — "You look lovelier to me every 
minute. Do you know what that's a sign 
of?" 

Betty — "Sure. You're about to run 
out of gas." 



"If you join our lodge you will be 
buried with music." 

"That's no inducement for me. I'm 
not a bit musical." 



Diner: "Waiter, this soup's cold. 
Bring me some that's hot." 

Waiter: "What do you want me to 
do, burn my thumb?" 



Tommy — "Grandma, if I was invited 
out to dinner, should I eat pie with a 
fork?" 

Grandma — "Yes, indeed, Tommy." 

Tommy — "You haven't got a pie in 
the house that I could practice on, have 
you, grandma?" 



Butler — "I have to inform your lord- 
ship that there's a burglar downstairs." 

His Lordship — "Very well, Parkinson; 
bring my gun and sports suit — the hea- 
ther mixture." 



Insurance Man (putting questions to 
cowboy): "Ever had any accidents?" 

"No," was the reply. 

"Never had an accident in your life?" 

"Nope. A rattler bit me once, 
though." 

"Well, don't you call that an acci- 
dent?" 

"Naw — 'he bit me on purpose." 



During the filming of "Napoleon," 
someone remarked to Ricardo Corte? 
that the movie ought to have a happy 
ending. 

"They're giving it one," Ric retorted. 
"They're letting Napoleon win the bat- 
tle of Waterloo." 



FORMER LEAGUE ATTACHE 
SPEAKS TO STUDENTS 



(Continued from Page One) 



the United States. In spite of the fact 
that the United States does not belong, 
that country is represented at all the 
meetings of the League. There is usual- 
ly an American observer in the gallery. 
Health Work Outstanding 
The League is particularly successful 
in the department of health. Sir Eric 
Drummond, former secretary-general of 
the League, said that "with respect to 
health, the world is not opposed to ad- 
vancement." The covenant of the League 
needs to be revised, but Dr. Salsam 
thinks that it will not be organized ac- 
cording to France's plan, which would 
make it the police force of the estab- 
lished order. 



Breathes there a dame with soul so 
dead, 

Who never to herself hath said, 
"I'm overweight — that's for the 
best — 

That's my resemblance to Mae 
West. 



Women's Teams Chosen 
For Debating Season 



Debating activities are well under way 
for the girls on our campus. The teams 
chosen are : Louise Gillan, Winona 
Shroff, and Marian Leisey, negative; 
and Kathryn Mowrey, Helen Earnest 
and Grace Naugle, affirmative. 

Both teams are busy gleaning infor- 
mation for the question of debate: "Re- 
solved, that the essential features of the 
N. R. A. be adopted as the permanent 
policies of the United States govern- 
ment." 

Several debates have been arranged. 
Those certain are: 

Elizabethtown, March 6 — negative 
team travels. 

Westminster, March 8 — affirmative team 
travels. 

Westminster, March 15, single debate 
— negative team travels. 

Ursinus, March 20, single debate — 
negative team travels. 

Western Maryland and Cedar Crest 
have agreed to debate but the dates are 
undecided. Answers are expected from 
Hood, Drexel and Albright for debating 
arrangements. 




THIRTY-FIVE CENTS 
\sn 3 t IMLuch! 

M ost college allowances go only so far. But 
even at that you can probably spare 35 cents 
once a week. 

It isn't much— 35 cents — hardily the price 
of a movie or hair cut. Yet for 35 cents, if 
you know the ropes, you can telephone as far 
as 100 miles. 

That probably means you can telephone 
home! Can 35 cents buy more pleasure than 
that? You can pick up a budget of family 
news . . talk over your problems . • . share 
youi interests. There's nothing like a "voice 
visit" with the folks back home to brighten 
your whole week — and theirs. 



of ill 



TO TAKE ADVANTAGE 
e LOW \HpII1 RATES... 




Call after 8:30 P.M., and be sure to make 
a Station to Station call. 

That means, ask the Operator for your 
home telephone, but not for any specific 
person. 

If you've fixed a date in advance, the family 
will be sure to be there. 

35 cents at night will pay for a 3-minute 
Station to Station call to anywhere within 
100 miles. 



THE BELL. TELEPHONE COMPANY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

M— 2 



I 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1934 



Why Love Anyway?' Ask Kalos 



In a heated debate, four members of 
Kalo, well versed on the subject of love, 
strove to prove and disprove that "it is 
better to have loved^and lost than never 
to have loved at all." 

Kalo hall was honored by having the 
robust figure of Earl Hoover and the 
florid Jack Todd taking the negative side 
of the question. And equally important 
and honorable, the ministry of the so- 
ciety, bass-voiced Barney Mentzer, and 
the smooth-tongued Morgon Edwards 
took the affirmative side. 

The formality of the debate was re- 
versed by having the negative speaKer, 
Jack Todd, confide his opinion to his 
audience. Todd dug deep into the realms 
of literature, bringing to light the great 
love affair of Cleopatra and Antony. 
Todd says, "Antony wa s sorry; let us 
not be iike Antony and regret that we 
have left our emotions bring great dis- 
asters on us." Although the society 
members did not take this lightly, they 
wondered if Todd spoke from experi- 
ence. Finally, after making a few of his 
audience uneasy because of their adven- 
tures with the love problem, Barney took 
the floor and proceeded to make these 
poor creautres happy. Mr. Mentzer 
claimed he was not well acquainted with 
the question, but he thought life would- 
n't be very joyous without having love. 
Then, too, it is well to remember that 
Barney may some day secure revenue 
from any "matches" he concludes. Fol- 
lowing the inevitable Earl Hoover, speak- 
ing of experiences concerning himself 
and other members of the society, tried 
to prove, taking statistics of state insti- 
tutions, and fellow members in debt, that 
love is "the bunk," and it pays not ^ 
play within its boundaries, Hoover 
quoted often from Byron. 

Then all eyes turned to the Rev. Mr. 
Edwards, the last speaker, who strolled 
the floor as nonchalantly as Cupid him- 
self. He began with writings of Voltaire 
and ranged through history concerning 
love until he touched the great Garbo 
herself, which made a great impression 
on the movie lovers. Edwards says love 
cannot be judged, as the old saying goes, 
"The depth of the well cannot be judged 
by the length of the pump handle," but 
we must judge it by "getting" this thing 
called love. All agreed Edwards knew 
what he was talking about. 

The rebuttal was handled by Hoover 
and Mentzer. With all the fake statis- 
tics and knowledge of men of the Byron 
type, it was not surprising that Hoover 
and Todd of the negative side won. 

Dr. Shenk made the meeting very in- 
teresting by remarking on the debate 
and relating his experiences with the 
subject of wit, which kept the society in 
a placid mood from start to finish. The 
greatest laugh produced at the meeting 
occurred when Dr. Shenk brought it to 
a close by completely subduing member 
Moser, who had tried hard to start an 
argument. 



One of the clerks at the employment 
agency was a bit of a wit, and he was 
preparing to gain a laugh at the ex- 
pense of the next in line. 

"Where were you born?" he asked the 
man, a Scotchman. 

"Glasco'," was the reply. 

"Glasgow! Whatever for?" continued 
the funny one. 

"I wanted to be near mother/' said the 
other with devastating meekness. 



A coach is a fellow who is always will- 
ing to lay down your life for his school. 



Delphian Damsels 

Hold Date Night 

Nationally known orchestras sup- 
plied the music (by radio, of course) 
for Delphian date night held in Del- 
phian Hall last Friday evening. 

Gem Gemmill, Delphian presi- 
dent, acted as hostess. Darling and 
card playing were the main feature 
of the evening. Miss Wood and Miss 
Kenyon were the chaperones. 



Practice Teachers 
To Instruct Local 
High School Pupiis 



The course in observation and prac- 
tice teaching has been resumed for the 
second semester with the assignment of 
high school classes to those seniors who 
completed last semester the study of 
methods and theory of education. This 
course consists of five periods of activity 
in the Annville High School where the 
theory of secondary education is ob- 
served in action and is put into practice 
by the observing students. 

These seniors have already begun 
their period of observation, attending 
the first class on Tuesday, February 6. 
This period will be between four and five 
weeks, followed by a period of teaching 
for two weeks. The next set of two-week 
periods will constitute observation and 
teaching respectively after which the 
students will complete the required sixty 
days by a final observation. This will 
furnish the requisites of the State Pro- 
visional Certificate for teachers in secon- 
dary schools. However, the course does 
not only fulfill requirements, but it also 
provides the pre-service teachers with 
valuable as well as interesting experi- 
ences. 

Those seniors who are now observing 
classes in the high school and their as- 
signed subjects follow: Marion Book, 
English; Thomas Edwards, English; C. 
Daniel Engle, Biology; De Witt Essick, 
History; Gem Gemmill, English; Verna 
Grissinger, Algebra; Christine Gruber, 
English; Mary Groff, French; Richard 
Holstein, Biology; Dorothy Jackson, 
English; Peter Kandrat, Civics; Frede- 
rick Lehman, Biology; Max Light, Civ- 
ics; Anne Matula, Algebra; Thomas 
May, English; Paul Peiffer, European 
History; Allan Ranck, Algebra; Eliza- 
beth Schaak, History; Edmund Umber- 
ger, Algebra; Kathryn Witmer, English; 
John Zech, General Science. 



CO-ED CATNIP 



Woodwind Duet Played 
In Chapel Assembly 



The chapel period on Friday, Febru- 
ary 2, was in charge of Professor Rut- 
ledge of the Conservatory. First the stu- 
dent body "tuned up" with several 
chords, then attempted a new song. An 
adaption of the "March Slave" theme 
by Tschaikowski, "On, Oh My Soul," 
was enthusiastically sung by the student 
body. After this, the "Soldiers' Chorus" 
from Faust was practiced until all be- 
came familiar with it. The special num- 
ber of the program was a duet by Tony 
Jagnesak and Edmund Umberger, flau- 
tist and clarinetist respectively. They 
played "Liebesfruehling" by Ehrlich. 

Miss Rudh Bailey accompanied both 
the special number and the group sing- 
ing. 



DQUtrMhS 



B Always Reliable 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 



Examinations over! And with that, 
we see few or none of the three and four 
o'clock lights burning in< the girls' dorms. 
Can't say that about the men. It isn't 
unusual for the male students to keep 
the lights burning all night. Funny 
thing! There's been a regular orgy of 
"shooting the lights" in the dormitories. 
As far as the men's dotm is concerned, 
we've heard the cause lies at Freshman 
Reber's door, while another frosh from 
that end says that the lights would stay 
on if some certain fellows wouldn't get 
domestic and cook at odd hours of the 
night. What a strain on electricity with 
lights, heaters, radios, grills, percolators, 
etc., going at the same time. But what 
we want to know is — who's the fellow 
that hangs the works with the screw- 
driver? 

Becky Adams and Alma Cline shot 
their lights accidentally. They proceed- 
ed to turn the hallway into a "boudoir" 
and beauty parlor, but us who were too 
lazy to move into the hall, had to be 
content with dark rooms. Result — one 
black and one brown stocking, several 
misplaced eyebrows, left shoe on the 
right foot, carmine lipstick with rasp- 
berry rouge, etc. 



Do You Know — 

Who insists on shooting blanks in the 
wee hours of the morning? 

What professor wears a perfectly gor- 
geous purple handkerchief in his pock- 
et? 

What girl insists on reading her love 
letters to an interested but much amused 
^roup? 

What girl day student takes as many 
as five reducing tablets a day? 

What day student wears the latest in 
men's trousers — (he's modest about it, 
but ask Faust) ? 

What gang of night owls rigged up 
the buggy, automobile, and gas sign af- 
fair in front of North Hall? (I do). 

What prominent figure considers 
holding hands courting? 

What co-ed can sing beautifully in 
hog latin? 



We Nominate for Oblivion — 

Buzzell's tap dance in the dining hall. 

Intellects and A students who sit in 
class and recite from an open book be- 
fore them. 

Soup — all kinds. 

"Joe Penner" — or rather, those who 
mimic him. 

"Third degree" students who quiz a 



SHAPIRO'S 

Qlothes for the 
Well Dressed Man 

844 Cumberland St. 
LEBANON, PA. 




DINE and DANCE 
GREEN TERRACE 

ONE MILE EAST OF ANNVILLE 



WE INVITE 
L. V. C. 
STUDENTS 
TO TRY OUR 
DELICIOUS 
FOODS. 




professor constantly in class. 

See Economics 16 at 9:15, with M. 
Lonsdale objecting for the crown. 

"Irreverent" students who insist on 
whispering in chapel, not even drawing 
the line at the Lord's Prayer. 

The Invalids' Table — -most of them 
have lost weight since they sat there. 

"Three minutes past eight" students — 
if a student can be in an eight o'clock 
class at three minutes past the hour, why 
can't he be there at eight? 

People who insist on leaving open the 
front door of North Hall during meal 
times. 

"Punch" in favor of "Judge." 

"There's an Old Spinning Wheel in 
the Corner." 

Economy preachers who keep all the 
lights lit in one room (but not for econ- 
omy) . 

Outside readings — the text book i s no 
longer a sound investment. 



A.NNTTULE, 



PENNA. 



THURSDAY & FRIDAY 
CLARA BOW 

HOOPLA 



SATURDAY & MONDAY 
MARIE DRESSLER 
and LIONEL BARRYMORE 

HER SWEETHEART 



TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY 
JOE E. BROWN 



SON OF A SAILOR 



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J. E. GIPPLE 

Fire Insurance and Real Estate 

1251 Market Street 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



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GAS STOVES AND RANGES 
RUGS AND LINOLEUMS 
PICTURE FRAMING 



Furniture - - Undertaking 



PHtmB 144 ANNVILLE, PA. 



Dr. Wallace and Little 
I Symphony to Broadcast 

The Lebanon Valley College broad- 
casts will be resumed on Thursday eve- 
ning, February 15, at 8:30 o'clock, over 
station WHP in Harrisburg. 

The faculty member who will speak 
at that time will be Dr. Paul A. W. 
Wallace, who has chosen as his subject 
"Innocents Abroad One Hundred Years 
Ago." 

The music for the broadcast will be 
furnished by the Little Symphony or- 
chestra, under the direction of Professor 
Edward P. Rutledge. The musical fea- 
ture of the program will be a piano con- 
certo, "Concertina in C" by Mozart, 
played by Miss Margaret Early, accom- 
panied by the full orchestra. The or- 
chestra will also play several other num- 
bers. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

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C. H. SHEARER, Mgr. 



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SPECIAL 
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CLIONIAN PINS— $12. OO 



FOR QUALITY 

Baked Products 

PATRONIZE 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



20". DISCOUNT ON ALL MER- 
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JOHN HIRSH 

DEPARTMENT STORE 
9-11 W. Main St. ANNVILLE 



SPECIAL CARDS 
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and a SPECIAL WELCOME 
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Annville, Pennsylvania 



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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Listen to the 
Little Symphony 



VOL. X 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1934 



No. 21 



Albright Wins Over 
Lebanon Valley In 
Poorly-Played Tilt 

BARTHOLD, PATRIZIO STAR 



Lions Lead Throughout Listless 
Contest As Lebanon Valley 
Rally Fails 



In a loosely played game throughout, 
Lebanon Valley's Flying Dutchmen lost 
to the Albright Lions last night at Read- 
ing by a 43-42 score. The Lions held a 
decided advantage all through the game 
and the Blue and White were unable to 
cut down Albright's lead until they made 
a final desperate rally in the last three 
minutes, scoring ten points but failing 
to reach its goal by the slim margin of 
one point. 

Lead at End of Half 

Albright took the lead after Lebanon 
Valley had opened the scoring with a 
field goal and held it throughout the 
first half, sporting an 18 to 12 advan- 
tage at the end of the first twenty min- 
utes of play. In the second half, the 
Blue and White came back strong, and, 
led by Patrizio, Barthold, and Smith, 
pulled down Albright's lead to five 
points. However, the Lions were not to 
be denied and soon opened their lead by 
10 points. At this stage of the game, 
with three minutes to play, Lebanon 
Valley put up a desperate rally and 
scored 10 points in three minutes but 
an Albright foul spelled defeat. 

Barthold Ldads Scorers 

Barthold kept up his league scoring 
pace and led the scoring with 16 points. 
Miller was next for the Valley with 12. 
Patrizio and Smith were also in there 
(Continued on Page 3, Col. 5) 



Students Addressed 
By Bonebrake Dean 

SPEAKER IS DR. ASHCRAFT 



Thomas May Acts As Toastmaster 
At Life Work Recruits' 
Meeting 



Dr. Ashcraft was on the campus of 

Lebanon Valley College February 1 1 and 
12 

*i as a representative from the Bone- 
brake Theological Seminary of which he 
>s dean. His chief interest was the secur- 
m g of students from the graduating 
class for future study in the seminary. 

D r . Ashcraft addressed the student 
b °dy first in a joint service of the Y. W. 
and Y. M. C. A. which was held in the 
ciapel on Sunday evening. Mr. Allen 
^ e ffy was in charge of this service and 

. j*> Ruth Goyne played a piano solo. 

«s Dorothy Ely also played an organ 
^ ude and accompanied the hymns. 

e greater part of the service was taken 
l, P with the address by Dr. Ashcraft. 

The dean appeared next in the Col- 
lege Ch U 

nurch at the regular Sunday eve- 

S worship service, at which he 

Pre acherl *U i t .1 

j eQ tn e sermon. He again ad- 

ch 685 ^ stuc * ent body in the Monday 
a Pel service. During the day he inter- 
ed students in North Hall parlor. 
^° t L day ev ening, Dr. Ashcraft met 

r e L'fe Work Recruits around ban- 
suet ta L I 

n all x eS l!1 small college dining 

t^' r ' Thomas May was the toast- 
o nc j r anc * "Hed upon several faculty 
i Tlar | ( StU ^ cn,: guests to make brief re- 
tX-n- . C. A. Lynch introduced 

Ashcraft to the group. 



In J. 



Chapel Duet Played 
By Unger and Bryan 

On Friday morning, Feb. 9, a 
trumpet and trombone duet by 
Messrs. Earl Unger and Frank Bryan 
was the special number during the 
chapel period. The selection played 
was "My Song of Songs" by Clay 
Smith. The appreciation of the 
audience was shown in the request 
for an encore. The musicians kindly 
responded with a short "tricky" num- 
ber. 

The rest of the period was spent 
in group singing. The two sea songs 
"Sailing" and "Santa Lucia" were 
heartily enjoyed by the collegians. 



Drama Featured At 
Green Blotter Club 



Eclectic Club Has 
Successful Affair 



IS HELD IN PHILO HALL 



Rose Dieter, Gayle Mountz, And 
Allan Ranck Entertain As 
Toddmen Play 



Philo Hall was the scene of a most 
enjoyable party on Friday night. The 
"Eclectic Club," of which Helen Lane is 
president, gave a semi-formal dance with 
Jack Todd and his College Ramblers 
providing the music. Philo Hall was 
made inviting with floor lamps and 
bridge tables, at which several couples 
were playing. The evening was started 
off by dancing and, after the first few 
dances, the crowd joined in on a John 
Paul Jones which was the cause of much 
merriment. 

A few dances later, Allan Ranck was 
called upon to sing two numbers, "Con- 
tented," and "Let's Fall In Love." Some 
time later Rose Dieter, in her own ini- 
mitable way, executed a tap dance to the 
"St. Louis Blues." Jack Todd and his 
orchestra then decided to come into the 
limelight. They successfully took the 
floor with "Tiger Rag." Mr. Ranck 
again favored the company with "Smoke 
Gets In Your Eyes," followed by Gayle 
Mountz who beautifully sang "Silver 
Moon" from the operetta, "My Mary- 
land." The climax of the evening came 
with an "exchange heart" dance when 
partners for the evening were parted and 
forced to seek other partners. A great 
deal of confused fun reigned when lad- 
ies and gentlemen ran around trying to 
match hearts. An hour later, the dance 
ended to the well-known strains of "I 
Love You Truly." Mrs. Green, Miss 
Myers, and Professor and Mrs. Rutledge 
acted as chaperones for the evening. 



BIGLER'S EFFORT PLEASES 



Kreider, Miller, Hiltner and Straub 
Contribute to Program of 
Evening 

A one-act play, written by Adam 
Bigler, Was the feature article among 
those presented by members of the Green 
Blotter Club at their February meeting 
held last Thursday night at the home of 
Dr. and Mrs. George Struble. This 
play, given the title of "Oh Promise 
Me", was reserved till the end of the 
program, and was especially well liked 
by the club members. 

The story concerned a farmer and his 
wife, who always forced her husband to 
do her wishes by getting him in a 
particularly tight spot, as at the time 
she kept him down the well until he 
consented to send his son to high school. 
The play aroused much comment and 
discussion upon its various features, but 
especially on motivation and the like. 
Girl Friends' Troubles 

Other contributors to the program 
were Lois Miller, George Hiltner, Louis 
Straub, and Martha Kreider. Miss Mil- 
ler had prepared a short story, which 
was read by Betty Schaak in the ab- 
sence of the author. This was particu- 
larly light in vein, concerning the love 
affairs of a young man and two of his 
best girl griends in different towns, each 
of whom was entirely ignorant of his in- 
terest in the other. Expecting a rapid 
fire ending, the listeners were greeted 
with an almost nonchalant attitude on 
the part of the girl who discovered that 
she has been double-crossed. 

George Hiltner next presented a dra- 
matic sketch with three members of a 
family as the characters. The father 
and mother were presented in a scene 
where they were discussing their son and 
the marks they expected him to bring 
home from school. The expected hap- 
pened, but the end revealed that the 
marks were even of a much lower grade 
than expected. 

Poetry Not Neglected 
Poetry on the program was contributed 
by Louis Straub and Martha Kreider, 
who presented their latest poems for 
criticism and approval by the other mem- 
bers. 

At the close of the program, Mrs. 
Struble served some delicious refresh- 
ments. During the social period that 
followed, plans were made for the club's 
next meeting, at which time the topic 
of characterization will be discussed, as 
well as character development through- 
out literature. 



College Girls Prove to Be More 

Naive and Childlike Than Ever 



(From Intercollegiate Digest) 

Mae West is reviving the "figger" of 
grandmother's day. College girls are 
swinging into the spirit by bringing the 
naive outlook and child-like attitude of 
women of the gay nineties. 

According to a recent moving picture 
survey made among students, a "dream 
come true" production of a nursery 
rhyme and the portrayal of an old- 
fashioned girls' book are preferable to 
a red hot musical comedy with a setting 
as new as tomorrow. There is a great 
following of the fanciful, whimsical type 
of performance, with things different 
and entirely removed from the world of 



type men and women. Glorified rabbits, 
credulous, bright-eyed girls, and mis- 
chievous little boys delight the moderns. 

Naturalness is now indispensable in 
actors and actresses. Last year's survey 
shows this characteristic was specified by 
only a small group. Serious depth and 
strong character are now admired, and 
the glamorous women and "he-men" are 
less popular. 

Leslie Howard seems to be the favo- 
rite; crooners and Clark Gable have 
taken a second place. The four Marx 
brothers and Eddie Cantor are best ac- 
cording to some. A large number cast 
(Continued on Page 2, Col. 4) 



GREEK TRAGEDY GIVEN 1 
BY L V. a DRA MA TISTS 

BOOK DIRECTS SOPHOCLES' ANTIGONE 



Rose Dieter in Title Role Offers Fine Reading of Classic Lines — Sherk, 
Sholley, Earley and Ranck Give Good Support as Characters 
Come to Tragic End. 



DEBATERS OPEN 
SEASON TONIGHT 



Lebanon Valley will open its debating 
season tonight, meeting the affirmative 
team of Fairmont State Teachers Col- 
lege, Fairmont, West Virginia. The de- 
bate will start at 8 o'clock and will be 
hc*ld in Philo Hall. The subject for de- 
Date will be, Resolved, "That the essen- 
tial features of the N.R.A. should be 
adopted as the permanent policies of 
the United States government." Speak- 
ing on the negative side for Lebanon 
Valley will be Robert Womer, Calvin 
Reber, and William Earnest. 

The Fairmont Teachers, now on a de- 
bating tour of eastern Pennsylvania, 
have spent the whole week in this sec- 
tion, debating several of the teams 
which Lebanon Valley will meet later in 
ihe season. An alumnus of Lebanon 
Valley. I. N. Boughter, now a professor 
at Fairmont, is present coach of debat- 
ing, and will be with the team on their 
visit here. 

It is certain that a large audience will 
attend the debate as a sign of welcome 
to a Lebanon Valley grad, and the team 
of debaters from Fairmont. The ques- 
tion is well known and understood by 
everybody, so that the debate cannot 
fail to interest every person on the 
campus. 



Cuemeisters Start 
Second Annual Meet 



F. BORAN IS SUPERVISOR 



Peiffer, Klitch, Earnest, And Fish- 
burn Are Favorites — Saun- 
ders Not Entered 



Under the capable supervision and 
leadership of Frank Boran, the second 
annual Lebanon Valley pool tournament 
has progressed through the first round. 
Two matches are held daily, one at four- 
thirty, and the other at seven-thirty in 
the evening, and these are under strict 
supervision of a competent referee so 
that fair play will persist throughout and 
each contestant will have an equal 
chance. 

Neither Leslie Saunders, winner of 
last year's tournament, nor George Kon- 
sko, runner-up, is entered in this year's 
matches. Favorites for this year are 
Earnest, who easily defeated the strong 
Lehman, Peiffer, Klitch and Fishburn. 
All four of these men are efficient cue- 
ball artists, and any prediction as to the 
possible winner would be almost impos- 
sible. In an early match on Tuesday af- 
ternoon, Professor Gingrich easily con- 
quered Boyd Sponaugle, and for a while 
reta ; ned the possibility of a victory of 
age and experience over youth and vi- 
tality as the final outcome. 

Foilowing is a list of the rules set up 
by the sponsors of the tournament: 
(Continued on Page 3, Col. 2) 



Last evening the Dramatic Club pre- 
sented the play "Antigone" on the 
Chapel stage. 

"Antigone" is a typical Greek tragedy 
and was written by the ancient tragic 
poet Sophocles. It was enacted, as close- 
ly as possible, in the same fashion as 
when it was first written. The lines of 
the play itself were unchanged except 
for translation. No scenery was used 
except the plain blue back-drop cur- 
tain. 

Traditional Chorus Used 

The action of the play was continu- 
ous, no front curtain being employed to 
divide it into scenes or acts, and the 
traditional Greek chorus was used. The 
actors were in costume but a walking 
performance was given, that is, the parts 
were not memorized but were read. 

The play concerned itself chiefly with 
the conflict between the temporal laws 
of Creon, king of Thebes, and the divine 
laws of the old Greek Gods. Antigone, 
the chief character, has pledged herself 
to bury her slain brother Polynices who 
has died dishonored. Creon, the king, 
has decreed that the body of Polynices 
shall be left where it fell, a prey to birds 
and dogs. This was a fate regarded with 
peculiar honor by the Greeks since the 
funeral rites were believed to determine 
the welfare of the departed in the next 
world. 

Typical Ending 

This is the situation at the beginning 
of the play. The action develops the 
conflict and traces each characeer to his 
tragic end. As in all Greek tragedies 
all the main characters die by the end 
of the play. 

Following is the cast of characters: 

Antigone Rose Dieter 

Creon _ Charles Hauck 

Haemon 1 George Sherk 

Euridices Reta Sholley 

Ismene Maxine Earley 

Tiriseas Allan Ranck 

Messenger Charles Reber 

Sentinel Lloyd Beamesderfer 

Chorus — Allen Buzzell, George Hilt- 
ner, Harry McFaul. 

Miss Miriam Book directed the play. 
Dr. Stonecipher was the faculty director. 
The costumes were by Lena Cockshott. 



Y.W.C.A. is Sponsor 
Of Children's Hour 



The; Y.W.C.A., as part of its 
campus activity program, is sponsor- 
ing a Children's Hour every Saturday 
morning in the beginners' room of 
the United Brethren Church. All 
the children of the town who are be- 
tween the ages of six and eight are 
invited to come each Saturday at 
ten. 

The first of these hours was held 
last Saturday, February 10. Misses 
Ely, Weirick, Faust, Summy, and 
Mowrey helped with the program. 
A like response is expected next Sat- 
urday. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1934 



Ha Viz Collegtemte 

ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Edmund Umberger, '34 .. .Editor-in-Chief 
Kathryn Mowrey, '34 ... .Associate Editor 
Richard Schreiber, '34 . .Managing Editor 
Richard Baus. '37 Asst. Man. Editor 



REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Martha Kreider, '34 
Allan Ranck, '34 
Elizabeth Schaak, '34 
Helen Earnest, '35 
Sylvia Evelev, '36 

David Yake, '36 General Reporters 

Christine Gruber, '34 Conservatory 

DeWitt Essick, '34 

George Hiltner, '35 Athletics 

Catherine Wagner, '35 Alumni 

Clyde Mentzer, '34 Philokosmian 

Robert Cassel, '36 Kalozetean 

Jane Shellenberger, '36 Clionian 

Marietta Ossl, '35 Delphian 



BUSINESS STAFF 

Jack Todd, '34 Business Manager 

Kenneth Sheaffer, '35. Asst. Bus. Manager 
Allen Buzzell, '34. . .Circulation Manager 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 



Single Copies » cents 

Subscription fl-00 per year 



Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter, under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



THURSDAY, FEB. 15, 1934 



THE DRIVE 



The drive has started. Members of 
the class of 1934 are grimly trying to 
determine their occupation for the next 
year. The familiar question "After 
graduation, what?" is in nearly every 
mind. There may be a few who know 
where they will be a year from now; 
they are the fortunate ones who have 
located positions. But the great majority 
of the class of '34 in Lebanon Valley, 
as in other colleges, stand at a loss. 

One thing is nearly certain. If 
the immediately preceding years at 
small colleges like Lebanon Valley, 
as well as large universities, may be 1 
taken as criteria, then a consider- 
able proportion of the graduating 
class either will be jobless a year 
from now, or will be working at 
occupations other than those for 
which their undergraduate work 
prepared them. 

This is not pointless pessimism. It is 
merely recognition of a change which 
has come upon education in the last few 
years, a change which had its roots in 
the establishment of popular graduate 
education, and its fruition in the late 
financial slump. 

In other words, the time has passed 
when a baccalaureate degree entitled a 
person to markedly superior esteem. So- 
ciety no longer offers the college gradu- 
ate his choice of a dozen lucrative ways 
to aid his fellow-men with his superior 
education. Now it is the graduate stu- 
dent who has the first claim to society's 
approval; the A.M. and Ph. D. of to- 
day stand where stood the A. B. of yes- 
terday. 

What does this mean and what is the 
graduate of 1934 to do about it? It 
means that the student, to gain the pres- 
tige and positions formerly commanded 
by a Bachelor of Arts or of Science, 
must go on to higher work for an ad- 
vanced degree. He must make a great- 
er investment in himself than did his 
father or even his elder brother. It 
means that facilities for graduate study 
must be wider-spread, that the ability 
for further work possessed by many col- 
lege graduates must be recognized, that 



if society demands advanced degrees, so- 
ciety must give them. 

The college graduate of 1934 must 
have faith in himself more than ever be- 
fore; he must believe that there is a defi- 
nite and proper place for even a lowly 
Bachelor; he must ever have his aim 
fixed on the goal of higher scholastic 
attainment. 



THE NEW AD. BUILDING 

What a little paint can do! The re- 
juvenated aspect of the old Ad. Build- 
ing, now almost completely done with 
the process of interior decoration, is a 
pleasure to every eye that inspects it in 
its new condition. 

The improvement has significance be- 
yond the strictly aesthetic. Modern psy- 
chologists aver with good reason that 
work, particularly of a mental nature, 
when done in bright and uplifting sur- 
roundings is superior to that performed 
in a drab and dingy atmosphere. The 
recent Administration Building project 
has made just such a change — from the 
drab and dingy to the bright and up- 
lifting. When the odours of lead and 
linseed oil have disappeared, it will be a 
great deal more pleasant to attend class- 
es in rooms with light buff walls and 
freshly-varnished woodwork than in the 
previous eyesores. 

From a scientific viewpoint, the im- 
provement is more startling. It is well 
known that light, freshly-painted sur- 
faces reflect more light than do dark, 
drab areas. Estimates made by observers 
armed with light-measuring devices re- 
veal that the new walls reflect between 
two and three times as much light as 
they previously did. Thus for several 
reasons we should feel properly grate- 
ful to be enabled to continue our class- 
room experiences in the new Ad. Build- 
ing. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

Mr. David B. Pugh, '16, instructor of 
Education of Penn State College, has 
been appointed director of the Warren 
Branch Junior College of Penn State 
College. Mr. Pugh resides at Warren 
and teaches at both Warren and Brad- 
ford. The Penn State Colege is offering 
freshman work at these two places. Mr. 
Pugh is in charge of these institutions. 



Miss Bernetha Strickler, '27, who re- 
ceived her M.A. degree from the Uni- 
versity of Vermont during the summer 
of 1932, is teaching German at War- 
ren, Pa. 



W. Maynard Sparks, '30, is the pastor 
of the United Brethren church at 
Shanksville, Central City. Mr. Sparks 
was pastor of the United Brethren 
church at Sewickley, Pa., during 1930- 
31. He was married to Blanche May 
Frank, Oct. 27, 1931. Mr. Sparks is 
also a part-time student in Graduate 
School, University of Pittsburgh. 



Mr. Robert Schaak, '31, is now em- 
ployed^ by the Federal Government at 
their branch located at Perdu Univer- 
sity at West Lafayette, Indiana. 



When you do dance, I wish you a 
wave o' the sea that you might ever do 
nothing but that. 

— Shakespeare 

They took Pan's flute of seven pipei 
Unbound the string and set it free! 

— Napoleon 

Mrs. Lynch To Fete 

Senior Class at Tea 

Mrs. C. A. Lynch will entertain the 
men and women of the Senior class at 
a tea to be given Thursday afternoon, 
February 22, at 3:30 o'clock. 

The tea will be held in the president's 
home. This Washington's Birthday af- 
fair is the first of the series to be ten- 
dered the graduating class. 



New Student Leader 

Embarks on Duties 




CATHERINE HECKMAN 



Miss Catherine Heckman is the effi- 
cient member of the conducting class 
from the conservatory who is taking 
charge of the chapel singing this week. 
Miss Heckman's stage presence and her 
poise, in addition to her fine ability to 
lead have produced a high quality of 
enthusiastic singing. 

FRESHMAN THEME 



BUCOLIC VS. BOVINE 

I have hideous recollections of a cer- 
tain cow. I might also say I have recol- 
lections of a certain hideous cow. This 
bovine serves to symbolize a period of 
my life particularly pregnant with sad 
disillusionments. I had always had ro- 
mantic ideas about farms and fields, corn 
and horses, chickens, pigs, barns, field 
mice, pumpkins, rakes and hoes, cows 
and milkmaids, mills and brooks and, 
in short, things rustic in general. As I 
have hinted, these padded-cell predilec- 
tions were doomed to perish. 

I was invited to live on a farm. With 
unbounded transports of poetic joy I 
seized the offer. I came to the farm to 
live. Circumstances immediately pro- 
ceeded to bound the aforesaid unbound- 
ed transports. My imagination received 
something of a blow at my first sight of 
the farm. There were no waving fields 
of grain on rolling hills. There was a 
rather small garden with one row each 
of several different varieties of inglori- 
ous vegetables. The farm house was not 




I Spent Long Hours Gazing 



true to form. There were no thatch 
roofed cottage, no clinging vines, no 
hollyhocks, no Dutch-door with a dear 
old lady in a poke bonnet standing be- 
neath the lintel. The animals were a 
serious drawback to real communion 
with nature. There was only one horse, 
a very sad specimen, one pig that smelled 
anything but romantic, and a conglom- 
eration of the usual fowls; these struck 
me as being a little below the average. 
My poetic soul, nothing daunted, girded 
its loins in the latest thing in overalls 
and went in for the simple life with 
gusto. 

I focused my efforts on the solitary 
cow that graced the premises. I deter- 
mined that we should become fast 
friends, soulmat'es so to speak. With en- 
during patience I pursued my object. 
At first I proceeded with the utmost cau- 
tion and polite reserve. I spent long 



hours gazing at the unsuspecting cow as 
she wandered about in the mud and 
weeds of the miniature meadow where- 
in she was coralled. Some times our 
eyes met and I could almost fancy that 
I felt a thrill of mutual sympathy. Later 
I ventured to form a closer contact. In 
order to display my unadulterated 
friendship, I took to flipping off the flies 
and mosquitoes that annoyed my cow 
companion. She didn't seem to mind 
this. Encouraged, I occasionally patted 
her haunches or tickled her muzzle. Our 
friendship was fast becoming cemented. 
I felt that the time had come to seal the 
banns with the last familiarity. I de- 
cided to milk her. 

That very evening I sat down beside 
her, and after a few playful words and 
a chuck beneath her constantly moving 
chin, I placed the bucket between my 
knees and proceeded to proceed. I had 
never had any instructions as to the 
proper way to pursue the operation nor 
did I want any. I felt that there would 
be something sacrilegious in allowing a 
third person to tread the hallowed 
ground of our beautiful friendship. And 
besides, this was to be a noble experi- 
ment. With gentle fingers I squeezed 
the teats. No milk, but two encouraging 
thumps on the back of the neck, ren- 
dered by the gracefully sweeping tail. I 
smiled to myself. I squeezed another 
squeeze. My friend twisted her neck to 
view the performance. I met her glance 
with the full and frank gaze of a true 
comrade. Did I see surprise in her eyes? 
Suddenly she mopped her enormous 
tongue across my smiling face. Over- 
joyed with this sign of her confidence I 
tugged with might and main. 

Suddenly there was a huge upheaval, 
a brown flank flew past my spinning vi- 
sion. From a position more horizontal 
than graceful I caught a fleeting rear 
view of friend cow thundering into the 
distant wood. I was rather surprised. 

All that night I hunted her. I stag- 
gered through swampy underbrush while 
the evening damps and dews swiftly 
crumbled and dissolved our psuedo-firm 
friendship. I ran crazily across barren 
hills where the bright moon-light bared 
the ghastly wound my soul's breast had 
sustained from the treacherous bovine. 
Alternately I cursed the cow in sento- 
rian roars or lisped gently, "Here cowey, 
cowey! Come along cowey!" Eventually 
I found her. 

Eventually I left the farm. Eventually 
I'll recover. 

— JERELL 



COLLEGE GIRLS REALLY 

ARE VERY CHILDLIKE 



(Continued from Page One) 



votes for Fredric March. Some think 
that Cary Grant is just trying rn develop 
a personality like that of Gary Cooper 
and said loyally that he never could be 
as good as Gary. John Barrymore and 
his brother Lionel have many ardent 
supporters; many girls said that to watch 
George Arliss raise one eyebrow was bet- 
ter than to see a whole scene enacted by 
other men. 

Katharine Hepburn wins by a nose — 
or maybe it's a voice or a hank of hair 
— over little southern Miriam Hopkins. 
Claudette Colbert is considered the most 
polished woman on the screen. A few 
girls put Ruby Keeler at the top, while 
many said their favorites were still Nor- 
ma Shearer and Joan Crawford. Greta 
Garbo must step down from her peak, 
since she received fewer votes than have 
ever been cast in a campus survey since 
she has risen to fame. 



Dr. Charles W. Burr, psychiatrist at 
the University of Pennsylvania, thinks 
that the chief trouble with present col- 
leges is that every man and woman wants 
his or her child to go to college, assu- 
ming that anyone can absorb education. 
Dr. Burr declared that the great major- 
ity of people have barely the mentality 
to grasp simple arithmetic, reading and 
writing 1 . 



(Campus Cuts 

Eddie Cantor Loses 3,000 Listeners 
As Detweiler Barn Burns" — such was 
"Hank" Palatini's suggestion for the 
headline in this year's Annville Journal; 
or is it a monthly publication? 

The gang from school beat the Union 
Hose Company with twenty minutes to 
spare. . . . Harnish saved a broken peach 
basket, Hauck a wagon tongue, and Speg 
struggled with an empty oil drum. . . 
In an attempt to move a cumbersome 
implement of some sort the whole crowd 
tugged for several minutes without suc- 
cess. Finally some observing individual 
(it couldn't have been Jagnesak) no- 
ticed it was bolted to the floor. 



No lives were saved by the volunteers. 
. . In fact Hoover and Umberger had 
high hopes, but didn't even glimpse the 
proverbial farmer's daughter. . . . "It 
couldn't have been a farm," says 
"Herb." 



Jordan did a good turn for a pal the 
other night and lost a sole. ... It wasn't 
even his sole, for he borrowed the shoes. 

The east end of the dorm has a riddle 
of its own. The Beamesderfers claim 
the Kanoff radio disturbs their slumbers 
.... The Kanoffs argue that their wor- 
thy opponents, in the riddle, bother 
them all day long by pounding on the 
floor. . . . "Anyway," says Mike — or is 
it Pete? — "they make more of a racket 
than we do." 



Lester Houtz and Bryan debated the 
relative beauty of various members of 
the family pisces. . . . Lester still claims 
the haddock wins the beauty contest, 
while Bryan supports the charms of an 
"unsmoked herring". . , . Whistler set- 
tled the argument by throwing them out 
of his room, for they refused to argue 
in the hall without an audience. 



Things We'd Hate to Pass Up — 

Eddie Duchin, Jack Denny, Casa Lo- 
ma, Vincent Travers, and their bands. 

The meal Saturday noon. 

Chapel — the one day each week we 
may cut. 

A bid to Delphian. A bid to Clio. 
(Now maybe the Co-ed Commentator 
will say something in praise of Philo 
and Kalo). 

The heat on these cold mornings. 

Jean Harlow. . . . 

Observing individuals note that May 
Day campaigns have already started on 
the campus. Bets are being laid freely 
on the respective "candidates." 

He that spareth his word hath knowl- 
edge. 

Popular opinion is the greatest lie 10 
the world. 



THE OLD SAGE 



(With whiskers — so long). An- 
swers all answerable or unanswerable 
questions, and how — 
Dear Sage: 

I have been impressed with your 
marvelous ability to aid others. There 
is a matter I have not been able to 
explain, — will you please supply i° c 
with light? Why do students here 
display so many faults in their enun- 
ciation, as for instance, pronounce 
sixty-six as "sisty-sis. " This is only 
one of many similar errors T note 
commonly. 

Vexed Professor. 

Dear Professor: 

Be not alarmed, Professor. Con- 
fidentially, students are only mimick' 
ing a peculiarity of yours. You wil' 
no longer be "vexed" after reading 
Burns, who says: "Would to Go 
the gift to 'gie' us, to see ourV' veS 
as 'ithers' see us." 

—The Old Sad<* 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1934 



PAGE THREE 



ner s 
was 
the 

'rial- 



nioti 
s to 
each 
5 Peg 

some 

rowd 
suc- 
dual 
no- 



sers. 

had 
; the 
. "It 

says 



1 the 

r asn't 
hoes. 

iddle 
claim 
nbers 
wor- 
other 
i the 
-or is 
acket 



i the 
rs of 
laims 
ntest, 
>f an 
r set- 
n out 
argue 



a Lo- 
ands. 

•k we 

Clio, 
itator 
Philo 



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freely 



rnowl* 



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An- 

rable 



yoUt 
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Con- 

sdin* 
Go* 



Gettysburg Bullets 
Beat L.V., 35-28, To 
Clinch League Lead 

ICITZMILLER HIGH SCORER 

Early Lebanon Valley Advantage 
Blasted By Powerful Get- 
tysburg Attack 

The powerful Gettysburg Bullets de- 
feated a fighting team from Lebanon 
Valley at Lebanon last Saturday by a 
score of 35-28, and jolted severely the 
championship aspirations of the Mylin- 
me n. The league leaders showed a strong 
attack, and undoubtedly are unsur- 
passed in passing ability by any other 
team in the league. The locals fought 
hard and stubbornly, and at times it ap- 
peared as though they might eke out a 
victory, but the visitors were always 
capable of retaining their small margin 
of safety. Lebanon Valley never headed 
the Bullets except for a few minutes at 
the opening of the contest. 

L. V. Has Early Lead 
The game started fast and the local 
rooters were cheered as the Blue and 
White took an early 3-0 lead, but the 
Bullets were not to be outstripped and 
soon overtook their rivals. From this 
point on, the game settled down to a 
fast, well-played encounter with the Bul- 
lets holding a slight edge throughout. 

Much credit for the fine showing made 
by Lebanon Valley goes to "Bill" Smith 
and Max Light whose superb defensive 
ability kept their team in the fight. Both 
Smith and Light were virtually out on 
their feet near the end of the fray. Bar- 
thold and Rust also played their usual 
fighting game, although both seemed to 
lack their normal scoring ability. Bar- 
thold, in particular, seemed to have 
trouble in retaining the ball. Miller was 
high scorer for the Blue and White with 
nine points. 

Papers Laud Smith 
Evidence of the "fight" which char- 
acterized our players is shown in the 
following article clipped from a Leba- 
non paper: 

"Not every day do spectators at an 
athletic contest see an athlete give until 
he is almost completely exhausted. Yet 
Lebanon fans saw that very thing Satur- 
day night when 'Bill' Smith, scrappy 
Blue and White athlete, gave everything 
ne had against Gettysburg. Smith fought 
until he was on the verge of a physical 
collapse. One time near the end of the 
game it was very evident that the star 
Lebanon Valley guard was almost out on 
his feet. But he stuck to the ship and 
went down with it." 

Surely a victory lost by a team which 
ls composed of such players one can 
w ell be proud of. That's the kind of 
team with which a school should "stick 
't out" to the end. The boys didn't bring 
home a w ; n k ut snowe d that they 

Just won't give up. The score: 
Lebanon Valley 

G. F. Pts. 

B arthoId, f 3 17 

P atrizio, f .000 

Rust, f 2 2 

Williams, f ..113 

* 0se . c i o 2 

Mil Ur, c 4 19 

f mith > g 12 4 

g lght ' g 1 1 

• S PonaugIe, c 

Totals 10 8 28 

Gettysburg 

If. G F. Pts. 

filler, f 5 10 

H rach *' f 3 17 

X C 2 -> O 

iu Ian > « 2 2 6 

" s > 8 2 4 

Ikewit *. s IZ o 
R°! als ..n 1 3! 

Ke feree- R 

lce - Hoyer. 



CUEMEISTERS START 

SECOND ANNUAL MEET 



(Continued from Page One) 



1 — No sitting on table — use bridge. 

2 — Call all balls; (a) banks, kisses, 
and billiards. 

3 — Please refrain from applauding — 
it causes the contestants to become ex- 
cited. 

4 — Call out all fouls committed by 
opponent. Inform the referee before 
your opponent shoots again, or your 
claim will be disallowed. 

5 — Call out opponent's scratches. The 
scratch will not be held against the op- 
ponent if not called. 

6 — The referee shall be the sole judge 
of the game. 

7 — There shall be no side-line coach- 
ing. It is very unsportsmanlike. 

8 — Three consecutive scratches by the 
same players in one frame forfeits the 
frame. 



OTHER COLLEGES 



Survey By Intercollegiate Digest 
Shows Wide-spread Use Of 
P. W. A. And C. W. A. 



A survey of the country indicates that 
from coast to coast the government is 
spending or will soon appropriate mil- 
lions of dollars for colleges to be used 
for new buildings, equipment or for spe- 
cial research or other work which will 
provide employment for thousands of 
students and others by these expendi- 
tures. 

More than #2,100,000 will be avail- 
able for construction and equipment of 
the new Main Building at the University 
of Texas, and the razing of the old Main 
Building is to be done with civil works 
labor and salaries, and the salvage, it 
is said, will pay practically all razing 
costs involved. 

Virginia Military Institute has been 
awarded a $360,000 loan by the Public 
Works Administration. The action of 
the federal board comes as a result of 
application filed by the institute last 
year. 

The loan and grant will be used for 
the construction of a new mess hall to 
cost #200, 000; for fire-proofing and 
otherwise improving Maury-Brooke Hall, 
#40,000; for enlarging and fire-proofing 
the military store and tailor shop, #30,- 
000, and for the construction of a new 
utilities building, #90,000. 

Washington officials have allotted a 
loan or grant of #168,400 for the con- 
struction of a men's dormitory and 
#238,000 for a fireproof library at Mas- 
sachusetts State College. 

At Rhode Island State College a grant 
of over #1,000,000 has been awarded by 
the State PWA and early approval from 
Washington is expected. This money is 
to be used to construct a new library and 
administration building combined, a new 
women's dormitory, a new Home Eco- 
nomics building and the balance to re- 
model certain buildings already on the 
campus. 

The Greek theatre and Hilgara field 
at the University of California are to be 
enlarged and several hundred people 
have been employed on various CWA 
and CWP projects. 

Twelve research projects involving 
121 persons have been set up at the Uni- 
versity of Chicago. This university, to- 
gether with Harvard, Yale, Columbia, 
University of Michigan and the Univer- 
sity of California, has been selected to 
study various aspects of education at the 
college, secondary, elementary, pre- 
school and adult levels. 
Between 75 and 100 men who have been 
given employment under the Civil 
Works Administration program are 
working on the Purdue University camp- 
us, carrying through several projects 
which will have lasting benefits. 

The approval of a CWA project 
which provides for an educational, so- 
cial and historical survey of the Monroe 



LEAGUE STANDING 



Gettysburg 
Lebanon Va 
Muhlenberg 
F. &C M. 



w. 


L. 


Pet. 


5 


1 


.833 


4 


3 


.571 


4 


3 


.571 


4 


3 


.571 


3 


3 


.500 


1 


4 


.200 





5 


.000 



County schools to be carried out under 
the supervision of the Indiana Univer- 
:ity School of Education was received 
from the State CWA board. 

The survey, which will employ seven 
persons until February 15, is the fifty- 
second CWA project to be put into ef 
feet in Monroe County. Only workers 
who are skilled in research and educa- 
tional work will be considered for the 
job. 

The work of beginning a compilation 
of a complete history of the State of 
Texas was launched by a CWA grant to 
the University of Texas, whose delegated 
workers will start this project by collect- 
ing old records of Wichita Falls and 
the Wichita Falls area. 

At the University of Oklahoma 103 
men are at work on the campus "white 
collar" projects. Each employee is work- 
ing six hours a day, five days a week, 
and work has already been assigned to 
cover practically the entire amount of 
money available. 

Pay for the work is 40 cents an hour 
for unskilled help and 51 of the men 
employed are in this group. Forty-four 
people have been hired as semi-skilled 
at 60 cents an hour. Eight skilled work- 
ers have been employed. 

The work covers three general pro- 
jects^ — research, repairing and improv- 
ing teaching facilities, and the compiling 
of information. 

Research work at Rutgers University 
has been extended by the employment 
of more than a score of assistants and 
clerks as the result of approval by the 
federal government of the first Civil 
Works Service project. The projects are 
approved primarily for research and al- 
low for the temporary employment of 
twenty-four persons — thirteen research 
assistants, five statisticians, four stenog- 
raphers, one editorial assistant and one 
timekeeper. 

Members of Omicron Delta Kappa at 
the University of Kentucky met with 
President McVey recently and passed a 
set of resolutions requesting the board 
of trustees to apply for sufficient funds 
from the Public Works Administration 
to erect and furnish a Student Union 
building. 

The chief hitch in the plans for the 
Student Union building has been the 
difficulty in securing funds with which 
to pay the annual amortization fee on 
the investment. The plan for securing 
funds, set forth in the resolutions, is the 
assessment of two dollars yearly upon 
each student for membership in the Stu- 
dent Union Building Association which 
will provide all the privileges of the 
building and the swimming pool. 

The CWA quota which authorizes the 
expenditure of #75,000 on campus pto- 
jects at North Carolina State College 
includes several important items. Most 
of the important roads will be surfaced 
with bituminous surface as well as the 
construction of 2,100 lineal feet of con- 
crete sidewalks. 

The CWA has just approved a pro- 
ject calling for the expenditure on build- 
ings and equipment to be constructed on 
the prison farm. By doing this the State 
College animal husbandry students will 
receive better training in animal hus- 
bandry and the prison will receive part 
of the products of the farm, thus econo- 
mizing on both sides. 

As a direct result of a meeting of 
eight denominational colleges called by 
Dr O'Brian and held in Sioux City, 
Iowa, January 5, Father O'Hara, acting 
president of Notre Dame, Nowlen of 
Grinnell, and President O'Brian of 
Morningside, acting as delegates of this 



meeting, will go to Washington to seek 
25 million in government aid for col- 
lege students, either in projects similar 
to the CWA, or as direct loans to stu- 
dents. 

Decision to deliver an ultimatum that 
colleges will close unless students are 
given aid was reached at this meeting 
of the representatives of these colleges 
of Iowa, South Dakota and Nebraska. 

The list of appropriations already ap- 
proved or contemplated as outlined 
above is by no means complete, but it 
gives some indication of the effect upon 
the colleges and universities of the New 
Deal. 



Students 100 Years Ago 

Before professors begin damning stu- 
dents for their conduct they might con- 
sider how men in positions like their 
own were treated by students of a hun- 
dred years ago. 

In 1846 President Everett of Har- 
vard wrote: "It is necessary when Dr. 
Ware commences his lectures to the 
freshmen class (of two students) on 
Wednesday to send a proctor to protect 
the professor from being pelted with 
chestnuts." 

Andrew D. White (you surely must 
have heard of the gentleman before) 
Wtote in his journal: "I myself saw at 
Hobart College one professor, an ex- 
cellent clergyman, driven out of a room 
through the panel of a door with books, 
hoots, and spittoons thrown at his head, 
and I saw, more than once, snowballs 
and bottles hurled at the head of the 
highly respected president of the col- 
lege, whom I also saw at another time 
iocked in his lecture room and forced to 
escape from a window by a ladder low- 
ered from the second story." 



The statement that, "There are no 
gentlemen in universities," was recently 
made by Dr. Albert Menut in a talk to 
men students at the Literature House of 
Syracuse University. Dr. Menut, who is 
of the romance languages department of 
that university, qualified this statement 
by saying that the present use of the 
term gentleman is misapplied to a so- 
phisticated sham of the ideational type. 
He called to mind that when we speak 
of a gentleman we only mean external 
appearances of dress and formalized 
mannerisms. The chivalric ideal of a 
gentleman has been subordinated by the 
growth of industry, which has placed 
gentlemen at a tremendous economic 
disadvantage. "So," he says, "there are 
actually no gentlemen in our highly so- 
cialized world." 



"There is no room in English athletic 
contests for 'rah-rahism'," says Prof. 
Kapper- Johnson, a graduate of Oxford. 
Every English student takes part in ath- 
letic contests mainly because it is expect- 
ed of him. If he does not take part, 
pressure is brought to bear to make him 
do so. In comparison with the method 
used in this country, English athletic 
teams are not just a few chosen men who 
are actually given scholarships to secure 
their playing, thus making the major 
athletic competitions money making pro- 
positions; but every student is given a 
chance to compete, for the sake of pro- 
viding recreation and sport for him. 
Also, there is no organized cheering or 
"pre-game propaganda" on the part of 
English students, but merely an attitude 
of spontaneous approval of an excellent 
play or a strategic act of sportsmanship. 
Prof. Kapper-Johnson concluded by say- 
ing that the participants for each game 
are selected on the basis of their per- 
formance, and that it is a great honor to 
perform in any of these competitions. 



In fact, just about the greatest day in 
a man's life is the day that he learns 
when not to think, (from E. L. Thorn- 
dike as stated by A. E. Wiggam.) 



Lord! I wonder what fool it was that 
first invented kissing — Moore. 



Fame is a magnifying glass. 



GIRLS LOSE TO 
ELIZABETHTOWN 

The girls' basketball team traveled to 
Elizabethtown College last night and 
suffered a 37-20 setback. The Eliza- 
bethtown sharp-shooters, held in check 
by the Weirick sisters, got very few 
chances at the basket but they made good 
on practically every chance they had. 

The Lebanon Valley forward section 
was considerably hampered due to the 
absence of Gem Gemmill, who broke her 
linger at the weekday practice. Orth, 
Light and Smith successively tried to 
fill Gem GemmilPs place but no ade- 
quate combination was evolved. 

Chamberlin and Orth did brilliant 
work in the center positions and rushed 
the ball to Krebs who made the most of 
the points scored by L. V. in the game. 
This is Lebanon Valley's second defeat 
out of three tries, but the girls are hop- 
ing for a change of luck next time. 



ALBRIGHT VICTORIOUS IN 
LOOSELY-PLAYED GAME 

(Continued from Page One) 

for the Blue and White. Iatesta and 
Oslislo with 12 and 14 points respec- 
tively were the Albright scoring aces. 

In a preliminary, the Lebanon Valley 
Frosh decisively defeated the Albright 
Frosh by a 35 to 18 score. Kinney, Bil- 
let and Snell starred for the Frosh. 

Lineups: 

Lebanon Valley 

G. F. T. 

BarthoId, f 7 2 16 

Patrizio, f 2 15 

Rust, f 

Rose, c 

Miller, c 6 1 13 

Williams, g 2 4 

Light, g ____ 

Smith, g 1 2 4 

Totals 18 6 42 

Albright 

G. F. T. 

Iatesta, f 5 2 12 

Wick, f 2 4 

Hino, f 2 2 

Ross, c — 14 6 

Shipe, c .... 

Slack, g 

Woods, g 2 1 5 

Oslislo, g 6 2 4 

Totals -- 16 11 43 

Referee: Boyer. 

Lineups: 

Lebanon Valley Frosh 

G. F. T. 

Kinney, f _ 4 4 12 

Loose, f _ 11 

Holtzman, f 11 

Billet, c 3 2 8 

Crook, g 

Snell, g 4 2 10 

Houtz, c 

Speg, g 1 1 3 

Totals -12 11 35 

Albright Frosh 

G. F. T. 

Becker, f 4 3 11 

Kehler, f ..... 1 2 

Howard, c 

McClintock, c — - 1 2 

Ettele, g - 

Oberzot, g .... - 

Barnitt, g - 

Garnet, f 113 

Totals - - 7 4 18 

Referee: Smith. Timekeeper: Jones. 



RAE ANNA REBER 
HOSTESS AT TEA 



The Y.W.C.A. entertained the Sopho- 
more members of the organization at 
tea in the North Hall parlor Thurs- 
day afternoon, Feb. 15. Rae Anna 
Reber was hostess at this function. 

The freshman "Y" cabinet, of which 
Martha Faust is president, helped with 
the preparations and served. 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1934 




M.J.S.. OR THE EDITOR'S REVENGE 



In Sultan Ladies 

A sultan at odds with his harem 
Thought of a way he could scare 'em. 

He caught him a mouse — 

Let it loose in the house, 

Thus starting the first harem scarem. 

Zip'n Tang 



Marg — "I was 21 last week but I can't 
vote." 

The Grapper — "Why not?" 
Marg — "There's no election." 



A bachelor is a guy who didn't have a 
car when he was young. — Red Cat. 



"Ho! Ho! cried the villainous villain, 
as he chopped off the hero's wooden 
leg. "I guess that's taking him down 
a peg." — Mercury. 



King Arthur — "How much'll you take 
for his suit of armor, Lance?" 

Lancelots — "Three cents an ounce, Art. 
It's first class mail." — Siren 



"Just think, Bill tried to put his arm 
around me four times last night." 
"Holy Henna, what an arm!" 

— Mercury. 



Frosh — "What model is your car, Urn- 
berger?" 

Interrupter — "It's not a model; it's a 
horrible example." 



"Lookit that guy!" cried Nero as a 
gladiator entered the arena, "Dressed fit 
to kill." — Widow 



He (after telling joke) — "Now wasn't 
that funny?" 

She — "Yes, but you should have heard 
the way grandma used to tell it." 

— Buccaneer. 



They laughed when I walked over to 
the piano — but they were right; I could- 
n't lift it." — Log. 



Lady (at almond counter) — "Who at- 
tends to the nuts?" 

Wise Guy — "Be patient, I'll wait on 
you in a minute." — Log. 



Bill — "Would you take a fellow's last 
cent for a pack of cigarettes?" 

Henry — "Yes, sir! I have none to give 
away." 

Bill, the great one, gently picked up 
the cigarettes and left his last penny on 
the counter. 



They laughed when I started to make 
a new kind of dynamite, but when I 
dropped it, they exploded. — Yale Record. 



Famous Surgeon — "I have been treat- 
ing men fot ten years and have never 
heard a complaint. What does that 
prove?" 

Voice — "Dead men tell no tales." 

— Blue* Gator 



He — "Just bought a nickel eraser." 
She — "I'd think a rubber one would 
be much better." — Widow 



"These jokes make me itch all over." 
"How come?" 

"They're lousy, you dope." 



32 Girls Organize 
New Military Band 

PROMISE SPRING CONCERT 



SPORT SHOTS 



Balanced Instrumentation Secured 
For Work of Student 
Conductors 



A girls' band was organized last Tues- 
day evening by Professor Rutledge. The 
band has a membership of thirty-two 
girls from both the conservatory and 
college groups. The instrumentation is 
very well balanced, and splendid results 
are expected by the sponsors. 

A spring concert is now being 
planned at which student conductors 
will take charge of the program. 

The organizations will meet for re- 
hearsal each Tuesday evening between 
7 and 8 o'clock. 

The members of the band are: 
Saxophones Clarinets: 
Hazel March Dorothy Ely 

Mary Webb Catherine Heckman 

. , Adelaide Sanders 

Martha falser 
Jane Showers Jean Bidng 

Virginia Summers Elnora Reeder 2 

Nancy Bowman Myfle Deav{m 

Trombones: Ethel Keller 

Matilda Bonanni Cornets: 

Anna Francis Rae Anna Reber 

Irma Kieffer Charlotte Stabley 

Cordelia Schaeffer Catharine Deisher 

Lavinia Cassedy 

Tubas: Helen Summy 

Ruth Bailey Elizabeth Bingaman 

Ida K. Hall Esther Koppenhaver 

Drums: Gayle Mountz 

Sara Light Baritone: 

Ruth Goyne Margaret Early 

Edna Binkley Oleta Dietrich 




BE YONDTS^ C&MPUS 



No matter how low the dollar will fall, 
it will never fall lower than some people 
will stoop to get it. 



"What's your idea of civilization?" 
the Prince of Wales was asked. "It's a 
good idea," replied the Prince. "Some- 
body ought to start it." 



Why, in a world bright with colors 
everywhere, are American men content 
to wear clothes that appear to have been 
dipped in writing ink, more or less di- 
luted, clothes that are amazingly accu- 
rate approximations of gravel, soot, 
sawdust, unripe olives, and spring mud? 
Mixtures that resemble in tint the accu- 
mulated sweepings in the bag of a vacu- 
um cleaner? 

In Germany and Austria hikers wear 
coats of blue linen, bright as cornflow- 
ers. But the American camper gets in 
tune with nature by covering himself 
from head to foot in olive drab. Even 
the college students venture forth on 
their turnip hunts and spring picnics in 
drab trousers and equally nondescript 
sweaters. Why not show the world the 
latest hits in color by appearing in start- 
ling smart ties and dashing jackets? All 
clothes are symbolic of a state of mind, 
and by that it seems that the male spe- 
cies must generally be in a pretty low 
mental condition. We shall live with 
more gusto when we dress as though we 
were part of a natural world. 



DQUtrjg 



Always Reliable M 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 




Lebanon Valley dropped an impor- 
tant game on Saturday night, but not 
before giving Gettysburg one of the best 
scraps seen for a long time. The boys 
put everything they had into the game, 
and showed that they really are a scrap- 
py outfit with an almost indomitable 



RECITAL TO BE 

GIVEN TUESDAY 




spirit. Gettysburg met a tartar Tuesday 
evening when they were defeated by 
Franklin and Marshall for their first 
league setback of the present season. 
Keep on fighting, fellows; we're still in 
the running. 



The girls' basketball season has al- 
ready opened, and three encounters 
have thus far been played. The lassies 
eked out a one point decision over Ju- 
niata College in the opening game of 
the year at Huntingdon, but have fallen 
v:ctims to the cagewomen of Ursinus 
and Elizabethtown colleges. Not many 




of us have seen the local fair sex in ac- 
tion, as all the games played so far were 
on rival courts. However, the girls are 
reputed to have a strong team with a 
wealth of freshman material. The Wei- 
rick sisters at the guard positions work 
well together, while Chamberlin and 
Orth, and Gemmill and Krebs present 
a strong offensive at the center and for- 
ward positions respectively. 



Well! Well! Another heavyweight 
champion has faded out of the picture. 
One year ago, many of us would have 
bet that Max Schmeling was another 
Dempsey and that he was "in" for a 
good, long time. Then, along came 
Max Baer and an almost unknown 
"Steve" Hamas, former Penn State box- 
er, and now Herr Max is just an old 
timer. It might be interesting to note 
that our own "Marty" McAndrews was 
a fellow student of "Steve," and knows 
him personally. 



L U 



DINE and DANCE 

AT THE 

GREEN TERRACE 

ONE MILE EAST OF ANNVILLE 




WE INVITE 
L. V. C. 
STUDENTS 
TO TRY OUR 
DELICIOUS 
FOODS. 



A student recital will be held in Engle 
Hall on Tuesday, Feb. 20, at 8 o'clock. 

The participants in the recital will be 
Misses Dorothy Ely and Ethel Keller, 
organ; Myrle Deaven, Catherine Deisher, 
and Irma Sholley, piano; Rae Anna 
Reber, and Gayle Mountz, voice; Nancy 
Bowman, French horn; and Mr. Russell 
Hatz. violin. 



AST© 13 



FLOWERS 

FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

BERNSTEIN'S 

LEBANON, PENNA. 



Steve Wornas 

Hoffman Steam Pressing 
Keystone Hat Cleaning 

lO WEST MAIN STREET 
ANNVILLE, PA. 

H. W. MILLER 

Hardware of Quality 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



ANNVILLE, 



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THURSDAY & FRIDAY 

KEN MAYNARD 



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Harrisburg, Pa. 



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lafitColkijienn 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Very Good, Delphian 



VOL. X 



ANN VlLLE, PENNSYLVANIA, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1934 



No. 22 



Delphisns Mark 11th 
Anniversary With 
Harrisburg Dance 

MUSIC BY DeMOLAY BAND 

Ciimson and Gold Colors Predom- 
inant in Atractive Decor- 
ations 



Saturday, February 17, marked the 
eleventh anniversary of Delphian. The 
alumnae were guests of honor at a tea 
given in Delphian hall in the afternoon. 
The hall was beautifully decorated for 
the occasion and the guests renewed 
their old acquaintances and played 
cards. 

The dance in the evening was held in 
the Civic Club in Harrisburg. Crimson 
and gold, Delphian's colors, comprised 
the color scheme used in the decora- 
tions. Gold symbols were attached to 
the crimson draperies on the French 
windows overlooking the river. The 
De Molay orchestra, a popular college 
band, furnished the music. They played 
many new and old pieces and several 
novelty selections. 

Black and white were the ladies' favo- 
rite colors and orchids made their bow 
on the Lebanon Valley College campus 
when several of our fair co-eds wore 
them to the dance. 

Miss Gem Gemmill, Miss Minna 
Wolfskeil, Dr. and Mrs. Lynch, Mrs. 
Gcssard, Mrs. Green and Dr. and Mrs. 
Reynolds were in the receiving line. Del- 
phian will join with Kalo in presenting 
their anniversary play, to be given at 
Kalo's anniversary in April. 



Life Work Recruits 

At Lebanon Church 



A deputation from the Life Work 
Recruits of the college gave their serv- 
es to the congregation of the Bethany 
United Brethren church of Lebanon on 
Sunday evening. The church was ob- 
sc ving Young People's Day, and the 
Pastor, the Rev. Mr. Mark, had turned 
is duties over to younger shoulders. 

Members of the deputation featured 
ln Christian Endeavor service prior 
to tne regular worship program, and in 
1 e latter Warren Mentzer preached a 
r ^° st ex cellent evangelistic sermon on the 

e rne Being Aware of God" using as 

Scn ptural basis the incident of the ap- 
P^arance of the cloudy pillar before the 
j^ u dren of Israel. He was assisted by 

° mer Kendall who conducted the devo- 

p 0ns - Miss Helen Summy sang "A 

ay er Perfect" as an offertory and a 
iiale n 

luartet sang two selections, once 
0nc e Christian Endeavor service and 
ln tn e worship service. 

Th 

tai n ^ rou P of college folk was enter- 
£ * after the church program in one 
yo Un 6 k° mps among a group of the 
T*l 8 P e °ple of the Bethany church, 
koth ^ e ' ig kted by entertainment 

ho ° w ' f and of refreshments. The 

°tisly e j PeC ' a ^ y Very c ' ever 'y and humor- 
fepl . P art to make the students 

61 at home. 

d e p Ut . °"°wing students were with the 
Nau^' " 1 Misses Helen Summy, Grace 
Mem/' Cnther ine Wagner, and Messrs. 

^sderf' dal1 ' B 'R !er < Denton, Bea- 
er » Hollingsworth, and Ranck. 



Dr. Struble Speaks 

At Friendly Hour 

A joint session was held by the 
two Christian Associations in North 
Hall parlor on Sunday evening. Dr. 
George Struble was the speaker. Dr. 
Struble gave to the student's verbal 
pictures of life as it exists in the 
Philippine Islands where he spent 
some time as a teacher. He gave in- 
teresting accounts of their religious 
customs and superstitions. He sup- 
plemented his talk with the use of a 
few maps and pictures which showed 
more plainly the existing situation. 
Miss Grace Naugle opened the 
program with a piano solo, and, af- 
ter the devotional service was con- 
cluded, Mr. Frank Bryan played a 
trombone solo. 

North Hall parlor was filled to 
capacity for the service, but the dis- 
advantages of the limited size were 
offset by the informality and comfort 
which was possible. The situation 
•there is advantageous to both the 
speaker and those who attend his 
words. 



Associations Give 
Prayer Day Program 

REV. MR. BARNHART TALKS 



Organ and Vocal Selections Pre- 
sented by Misses Ely 
And Summy 

Friday, February 16, was observed 
nationally and internationally as a 
World Day of Prayer. Students of Leb- 
anon Valley College took an active part 
in the observance of this special day for 
the first time since the Day of Prayer 
was inaugurated several years ago. A 
special chapel service was planned and 
carried through under joint direction of 
the local Y. W. and Y. M. C. A. 

The main feature on the program was 
a fifteen-minute exposition on the topic 
"Is Prayer Profitable?" This was pre- 
sented by the Rev. T. J. Barnhart, pastor 
of the United Brethren Church at Her- 
shey, and also a student in special work 
at Lebanon Valley. 

Thorough Treatment of Prayer 

Rev. Barnhart's subject was chosen 
especially for this occasion and was the 
focal point towards which all other parts 
of the service were directed. His decla- 
mation was thorough and interesting, 
covering every possible manner by which 
prayer might be considered profitable. 
Rev. Barnhart used many personal allu- 
sions as well as illustrations in general, 
and based it on the fact that all Chris- 
tian people are commanded to pray. 

(Continued on Page 4, Column 4) 



ADD NEW BOOKS 
TO L. V. LIBRARY 



A number of new books have been 
added to the library. The subject of 
most of them is economics, because of 
the unusual stress placed upon that sub- 
ject in these times. Among them are: 
Ayres, "Economics of Recovery," Sees, 
"Modern Capitalism," Adams' "Our 
Economic Revolution" and Fraser's 
"Great Britain and the Gold Standard." 

Also, several reference books have 
been obtained concerning the laws and 
statutes of Pennsylvania. 

(Continued on Page 2, Column 5) 



Little Symphony Is 'GANGLAND' THEME OF 

Radio Attraction ^ RA y HANSEN 



DR. WALLACE IS SPEAKER 



Margaret Early Piano Soloist As 
Prof. Carmean Directs Sym- 
phonic Group 

Thursday evening, February 15, from 
8:30 to 9:00 P. M. Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege presented another in its series of 
radio broadcasts over station WHP. 

The program consisted of three musi- 
cal numbers by the newly-organized lit- 
tle symphony orchestra and a short ad- 
dress by Dr. P. A. W. Wallace, head of 
the English department. The little sym- 
phony orchestra, composed entirely of 
students, gave a truly masterful per- 
formance with Miss Margaret Early as 
piano roloist and Professor Carmean as 
conductor. 

An orchestral number, "Cossack Rev- 
els" by Tschakoff, opened the program. 
The second number, "Concertino in C" 
by Mozart, was played as a piano solo 
by Miss Early, accompanied by the or- 
chestra. 

Dr. Wallace was next on the program. 
He gave interesting notes on the works 
of rome of the little-known writers of 
travel literature who lived at about the 
time of Shakespeare. He spoke of 
Thomas Coryate, author of "Coryate's 
Crudities"; Lord Herbert of Cherbury, 
poet. diplomat, philosopher; James 
Howe'!, buuneoc- S$mA ar.6 adventurer; 
and John Evelyn, the diarist, all of 
whom "belong to that ancient breed of 
:ound-eyed, open-mouthed, gullible, and 
garrulous folk whom Mark Twain named 
Innocents Abroad, and one member of 
whose fraternity he described as a lineal 
descendant of Balaam's Ass." 

The orchestra brought the well-round- 
ed program to a close by playing "Min- 
uet" by Mozart. 



Debaters Win First 
Against Fairmont 

JUDGES VOTE TWO TO ONE 

Interesting Arguments Provided on 
N. R. A. Question of 
Policy 

Lebanon Valley's men's debating 
team won their first debate on Thursday 
night in Philo Hali, when they met a 
team from Fairmont State Teacher's 
College. The question, Resolved: that 
the essential features of the N. R. A. 
should be adopted as a permanent poli- 
cy by the United States, was upheld af- 
firmatively by the visiting team, and 
negatively by a Lebanon Valley team 
composed of Calvin Reber, Robert 
Womer, Jack Morris and William Ear- 
nest. 

The unhurried style of the three 
southerners, Joel Jackson, Paul Rich- 
man, and Joseph Fordyce, contrasted 
sharply with the business-like attitude of 
our representatives. Points clashed well 
and the audience was quite divided as 
to the winner but in the opinion of the 
judges, Lebanon Valley won the debate, 
two to one. The judges, who graciously 
pave their time, were Mr. D. J. Leopold, 
banker of Lebanon; Mr. C. A. Boyer, 
school principal of Lebanon; and Rev 
K. O. Spessard of Annville. 

Other officials were Prof. G. A. Rich- 
ie, chairman; Kenneth Sheaffer, time 
keeper, and Clyde Mentzer, manager. 
Prof. E. H. Stevenson is coach of the 
Lebanon Valley team. 



GANGLAND'S TICKET HAS NOT EXPIRED 



Noted Lawyer, Criminologist, and Investigator Interests Stu- 
dents With Expose of Underworld Conditions — Special 
Reference Made to Recent Kidnapping Cases — Speaker 
Lauds Work of Federal Authorities In Detecting Crime 



Biographies Noted 
At Readers' Meeting 



To the extreme pleasure of the Lebanon Valley students, Mr. C. 
Ray Hansen, eminent lawyer and crime investigator of Chicago, lectured 
in chapel services Tuesday, February 20, on a most interesting and cur- 
rent question of which he is an outstanding authority — "Gangland." 
Following this address, he spoke to the members of the sociology classes 
and all those who desired further enlightenment' on the subject. 

The vein of his lecture was unusually thrilling, as it dealt with the 
"inside news" of actual criminal deeds that are alarming the present 
world. "Gangland's ticket has not expired," asserts Mr. Hansen, "just 
because Al. Capone has been committed to the bars for income tax 

* evasion. There was a time when we 
could blame crime entirely on Prohibi- 
tion, but now, with repeal, a new orgy is 
sweeping over the country, increasing 
the cost of living from 25 to 32 per 
cent." 

Local Jurisdiction Limited 

He placed great emphasis on the 
statement that "local authority is in- 
capable of meeting the new threat of 
crime. It is limited in its jurisdiction, 
a factor which enables too much pro- 
gress in gangland affairs." Then, too, 
due to certain political forces, "the level 
of intelligence is very low among some 
local authorities," another thought which 
must be considered by the American 
public. 

"Organized crime has an unbeatable 
system that cannot be monkeyed with." 
In the past six weeks there were twenty- 
continued on Page 3, Column 2) 



MODERN WORKS REVIEWED 



Gioff, Shellenberger, Harbold, Ed- 
wards, and Reber Give 
Special Reports 



A snowy night and a tramp to Dr. 
Wallace's were ideal openings for the 
monthly gathering of the Reader's Club, 
where biographies were the topic for 
discussion. As an opening, Dorothy 
Jackson briefly defined and explained 
the term "biography" — stating that these 
works vary considerably in size from 
short several-paged copiess to copiou 
volumes. 

Mary Groff reviewed the first book, a 
very entertaining glimpse into the life 
of Marie Antoinette by Stefan Zweig. 
Miss GrofF was especially impressed with 
the psychological analysis of the hero- 
ine's character so well expressed by the 
author. This biographer pictured Marie 
Antoinette as an ordinary woman — filled 
with human hopes, fears, and ideals — 
rather than the world-renowned figure 
that we are generally impressed with. 
Is Gertrude Ordinary? 

Gertrude Stein's biography, "Alice B. 
Toklas," was ably reviewed by Mary 
Jane Shellenberger. It is Gertrude 
Stein's clever way of writing her own 
life story under the guise of her secre- 
tary and companion. Even though Miss 
Stein tries hard to live like an ordinary 
woman, yet one can not help noticing 

(Continued on Page 2, Column 4) 



FRESHMEN BEAT 
LEBANON GROUP 

The Frosh basketball team added an- 
other win to their increasing string of 
victories when they met and defeated 
the Lebanon Business College, 40-24, in 
a game played at Lebanon last Thurs- 
day. The game was played on the floor 
of the Lebanon Y. M. C. A. and was 
fast and furious throughout. The 
Frosh, rff to a slow start, during which 
time their opponents rang up four ."Id 
goals, found themselves at the beginning 
of the second period and scored enough 
(Continued on Page 4, Column 3) 



Clionians Entertain 

As Seniors Perform 



The Clionian Literary Society held a 
very interesting meeting in the hall last 
Friday night. This was the first social 
meeting held under the second semester 
regime. Miriam Book, the president, 
presided at the business session. Follow- 
ing this period a clever program was 
offered by the senior girls of whom 
Charlotte Weirick was chairman. "Teen" 
Gruber, well known for her amusing 
readings, explained how the baby was 
taken care of. To the delight of all Cli- 
onians at the meeting, Tillie Bonanni 
sang two songs, one, "Voi La Sapete" 
from Cavelleria Rusticana, in Italian, 
and "Habenera" from Carmen in 
French. As a climax, Millie Nye and 
Betty Schaak entertained with an origi- 
nal skit in which they showed what a 
horror and a bore they had to endure 
to find a number for the program. Since 
the skill of these two entertainers has 
been proven the society was highly 
amused to say the least. 

When the meeting was adjourned the 
hall was thrown open for cards and 
dancing and day students as well as the 
dorm students were able to enjoy the 
comfortable furnishings that have been 
purchased and are being augmented 
from time to time. 

It is with pleasure the society is look- 
ing forward to more of these delightful 
opai- hou»«s. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1934 



£a Viz Collestemte 



ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Edmund Umberger, '34 .. .Editor-in-Chief 

Kathryn Mowrey, '34 Associate Editor 

Richard Schreiber, '34 . .Managing Editor 
Richard Baus. '37 Asst. Man. Editor 



REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Martha Kreider, '34 
Allan Ranck, '34 
Elizabeth Schaak, '34 
Helen Earnest, '35 
Sylvia Evelev, '36 

David Yake, '36 General Reporters 

Christine Gruber, '34 Conservatory 

DeWitt Essick, '34 

George Hiltner, '35 Athletics 

Catherine Wagner, '35 Alumni 

Clyde Mentzer, '34 Philokosmian 

Robert Cassel, '36 Kalozetean 

Jane Shellenberger, '36 Clionian 

Marietta Ossi, '35 Delphian 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Jack Todd, '34 Business Manager 

Kenneth Sheaffer, '35. Asst. Bus. Manager 
Allen Buzzell, '34. . .Circulation Manager 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 



Single Copies 5 cents 

Subscription $1.00 per year 



Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter, under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1934 



ANOTHER STEP FORWARD 



Another tradition, falls! The noble 
institution of inter-campus visitation, 
with vandalism and mutilation as ob- 
jects, seems doomed as negotiations are 
started between Lebanon Valley and 
Albright. At last collegians seem to 
have perceived the futility and puerility 
of such antics and are on the road to 
becoming the representative members of 
society they are supposed to be. 

Another vanishing tradition is right 
here on our campus. Freshman rules, 
and by that we mean the nonsensical, 
undemocratic and ineffectual freshman 
rules, are being held in disrepute by 
more and more students. We will not 
be surprised at their virtual disappear- 
ance in a few years. 

Now, the faulty philosophy which lies 
behind the more onerous freshman rules 
is evident. Restrictions which have their 
origin in other restrictions imposed by 
graduated clases do nothing more than 
take up the valuable time of the Men's 
Senate. Let us hope that enlightment in 
this as in other matters is forthcoming. 



lor, the former Edna Kilmer, is also a 
graduate of this institution with the 
class of '12. 

' a k ' ' 't\ 

George A. Wolf died suddenly on 
Wednesday night in the William Penn 
hotel in Pittsburgh while returning home 
from a church conference in Dayton, 
Ohio. His death was caused by heart 
trouble. He was 70 years old and was 
considered one of the leading laymen 
in the United Brethren denomination. 
He was financially interested in lumber 
mill work, coal, builders' supplies, and 
wire cloth industries at Mt. Wolf. 

Mr. Wolf is a graduate of Lebanon 
Valley College, '81. Dr. Showers 
preached the sermon at the funeral. 
Bishop Batdorf and Dr. Lynch, who 
represented the college, were present at 
the funeral which was held in the Mt. 
Wolf United Brethren church. 



Active in Debating at Lebanon Valley 



ALUMNI NOTES 



A meeting of the New York and New 
Jersey alumni association was held at 
East Orange, N. J., Saturday, Jan. 27. 
Approximately 40 members were pres- 
ent. The president, Dr. Harry Imboden, 
'99, conducted the business meeting. Dr. 
Imboden is a consulting roentgenolo- 
gist. The new officers who were elected 
are president, Roger Saylor; secretary, 
Ruth V. Hiester, '22. Plans were made 
for a meeting to be held in New York 
City some time next year. Dr. Lynch 
delivered the address of the evening. 
The talk concerned the present status 
and future outlook of the college. A 
period of discussion which consisted of 
the members asking Dr. Lynch questions 
followed the address. 

Dr. and Mrs. Lynch were the guests 
of Mr. and Mrs. Roger Saylor. Mr. 
Saylor is a graduate of Lebanon Valley 
College with the class of '11. Mrs. Say- | 



New Agreement Is 
Pending Between 
Albright and L.V. 

Jack Todd, president of the Men's 
Senate, to-day announced receipt of a 
letter from the secretary of the Albright 
Student Council, expresing regret for the 
painting of the Lebanon Valley campus 
during the fotball season, and voicing 
the hope that the mutilation might be 
ceased by mutual agreement. The letter 
follows: 

Albright College 
Reading, Penna. 

Secretary, Student Gov. Council, 

Lebanon Valley College, 

Annville, Pennsylvania. 

Dear Secretary: 

I am writing you regarding the muti- 
lation of your campus property by Al- 
bright students on the night of Nov. 
23, 1933, preceding the Albright-Leba- 
non Valley football game. 

During the year 1932 there was a 
written statement sent your student body 
to the effect that there should be no de- 
facing of either college's property. We 
received no written reply as to the rejec- 
tion or aceptance of such an agreement 
and so, do not feel that any written 
promise has been broken. 

However, we are not, by this means, 
attempting to excuse the action of sev- 
eral Albright students.. We owe your 
student body and faculty an abject apol- 
ogy, and we hope you will accept our ex- 
presion of regret that such a thing 
should have occurred. 

May we hope to renew our attempted 
agreement of 1932 to the effect that both 
Albright and Lebanon Valley students 
refrain from defacing or mutilating one 
another's campus property? 

Hoping to receive an early reply con- 
cerning the making of such an agree- 
ment, I remain, 

Sincerely yours, 
(Signed) Mildred Rothermel 

Sec. Student Council 





Mr 




ROBERT WOMER CLYDE MENTZER 

Werner, a member of the senior class, is the mainstay of the debating 
squad this year. He is entering his fourth season of college debating and 
i:: exhibiting to the audiences that attend the lively verbal clashes the strate- 
gems that he has learned during his extensive experience. Mentzer, also a 
member of the class of 1934, is imnager of the forensic squad and has ar- 
ranged the gruelling schedule that confronts the L. V. teams. He served as 
assistant manager last year and has had practical debating experience. 



u i. 



Famous Sayings 

Rose Dieter — "Sure I'd like to M 
this figure — but you can't take Iem 0n 
iuice forever." 

Bill Kirkpatrick — "The excess energy 
w«'th which women are filled is now ej 
pended in talking." 

Miss Wood (when asked for he- hash 
recipe) — "There is no recipe; the stuff 
simply accumulates. " 

Hershey — "If all the economists ;„ 
the world were laid end to end, they 
would never reach a conclusion." 

Helen Lane— "When a girl's fac? j s 
her fortune, it usually runs into an at- 
tractive figure." 



Student Recital Is 
Given in Engle Hall 



NEXT CONCERT MARCH 6 



Violin, Piano, Organ, Voice, and 
French Horn Selections Are 
Presented 



READER'S CLUB REVIEWS 

POPULAR BIOGRAPHIES 



(Continued from Page One) 



Disclose Indentities 

Of Heart Sisters 



The week of February 1 1 was an 
eventful one in the girls' dormitories. 
This was "heart sister" week. Each 
student was given another student for 
whom she was to do a "kind deed 
daily." These "deeds" included: mak- 
l the bed, giving some candy, emp- 
tying a waste paper basket, leaving 
some small gift, cleaning the room or 
sending flowers. The week came to 
a close Sunday, February 18, when 
at a tea in North Hall parlor, each 
girl revealed her identity to her 
"heart sisters." Many were the "ahs" 
and "ohs" at this time. This idea was 
introduced to the campus by Helen 
Cole from Otterbein College, who is 
now our representative in Africa. 
The plan was tried for the first time 
last year. In this, its second year, the 
week proved even more successful 
than at its first trial. 



At a recital held in Engle Hall on 
Tuesday evening, February 20, a skill- 
fully performed program was given by 
a group of student musicians. 

The program as it was given follows: 

Solfeggrietto ^ C. P. E. Back 

Sous Bois Staub 

Irma Sholley, Piano 
Adagio from G major Concert . Seitz 

Helen Butterwick, Violin 
My Mother Bids Me Bind My Hair 

Haydn 

All Soul's Day Lassen 

Love Has Wings Rogers 

Rae Anna Reber, Soprano 

Benediction Nuptiale Saint-Saens 

Dorothy Ely, Organ 

Am Meer - Schubert 

Nancy Bowman, French Horn 

Mouvements Perpetuels Poulene 

Catherine Deisher, Piano 

Voi Che Sapete Mozart 

Cloud Shadows Rogers 

Out of the Dusk Edwards 
Gayle Mountz, Soprano 

Allemande D'Albert 

Bear Dance .... Bartok 

Myrle Deaven, Piano 
Sicilienne J. S. Bach 

Russell Hatz, Violin 
Toccata and Fugue in D minor Bach 
Ethel Keller, Organ 
The accompanists were Miss Oleta 
Dietrick and Miss Nancy Bowman. 

The next student recital will be given 
on Tuesday evening, March 6, 1934, in 
Engle Hal!. 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



Wrestlers meet at Carlisle "Y". 
Saturday, February 24 — 

Drexel vs. Lebanon Valley at Leb- 
anon. 

Sunday, February 25 — 

Y. W." and "Y. M." meetings at 
5:45 P. M. 

Monday, February 26 — 

College orchestra practice at 3:30 
P. M. Band practice at 7:00 P. M. 
Tuesday, February 27 — 

Girls' band practice at 7:00 P. M. 
Lincoln University vs. Lebanon Val- 
ley. Dual debate. Men's negative. 
Wednesday, February 28 — 

Band practice at 7:00 P. M. 



how very different she is. Another in- 
teresting feature of this report was the 
bird's eye view into Miss Stein's home. 

A dog biography was a unique fea- 
ture, in which Lois Harbold brought out 
that Virginia Woolf treated this life 
story of "Flush" in a true dog-like man- 
ner, and not including human weak- 
nesses and characteristics in this dumb 
animal, as writers are often prone to do. 

Calvin Reber offered a very clever and 
witty criticism of the Journal of Gama- 
liel Bradford. He presented him as an 
individual who was constantly preoccu- 
pied in reading other people's charac- 
ters, but who had no understanding or 
insight into his own life. Mr. Reber 
claimed that Gamaliel really lacked soal, 
and that by reading between the lines 
one could surmize that this journal ob- 
viously had been written for publication. 
A Woman and the War 

The last review was the autobiography 
of Vera Brittain, "The Testament of 
Youth," read by Thomas Edwards, due 
to the absence of Anna Butterwick; the 
purpose of this work was to show the life 
of the average English woman and how 
it was deeply influenced by the World 
War and its disastrous effects. All those 
whom she deeply loved were killed dur- 
ing this period, and her life needed a 
complete reconstruction to build up the 
remains of her broken existence. Miss 
Myers offered several comments on this 
autobiography. 

It was decided to change the usual 
meeting from a Tuesday to a Monday 
evening with a proposed program on 
nonsense and society verse for the next 
assemblage. 



Dr. Derickson (viewing the new bush- 
es and trees on the campus) — "It's won- 
derful what the hand of man can do to 
a piece of earth with the aid of Divin e 
Providence." 

Dr. Light — "You should have seen 
this campus when Divine Providence 
had it all to itself." 



Athlete (leaving gym): "What's that 
strange odor I smell?" 
Bystander: "Fresh air." 



"Does Bill still walk with that slouch 
of his?" 

"No, I hear he's going with better 
women, now." 



Neighbor — "Say, have you folks got 
a bottle opener around here?" 

Parent — "Yeah, but he's away at col- 
lege." 



Clio Holds Party 

On Saturday Eve 

While numerous people from the 
campus were attending Delphian 
dance, the Clionian Literary Society 
provided entertainment for those 
who were left to spend the evening 
here. At a party in Kalo hall at 
which music for dancing was pro- 
vided first by Kalo's radio and then 
by Clio's, those who felt inclined for 
dancing could be satisfied. For those 
who enjoy cards, this entertainment 
was provided; for those who still get 
ioyment from puzzles these were pro- 
vided. And for those who get hun- 
gry and for those who don't, too, 
food was at hand in the form of 
punch, sandwiches, pretzels, and 
mints. Dr. and Mrs. Struble and 
Prof, and Mrs. Carmean acted as 
chaperones. 



Prof. Gingrich — "Our next speaker 
in chapel will be a lawyer from Chicago. 
I want all you fellows to remember that 
you are men and should act as such. 
Don't forget this is not Minsky's bur- 
lesque house." 

Frosh (from the rear) — "It's the 
same old crowd though." 



Pat: "Hello, Baby!" 

Gem: "I'll have you know that I'm 
nobody's baby." 

Pat: "Well, wouldn't you feel awful 
at a family reunion?" 



Mary March:" "Are there any ni# 
boys in this town?" 

Hick: "Yep! Everyone of them!" 

Mary: "Oh, well! How far is it to 
the next town?" 



Old Lady (to street car motorman) ; 
"Please, Mr. Motorman, will I get a 
shock if I step on the track?" 

Motorman — "No, lady, not unless y° u 
pur your other foot on the trolley wire. 



Minister — "Ah, so God has sent y° l1 
two little baby brothers, Bobby?" 

Bobby (brightly)— "Yes, and H« 
knows where the money is coming fro" 1 ' 
too — I heard Daddy say so." 



MANY NEW BOOKS 

ADDED TO LIBRARY 



(Continued from Page One) 



Among the books of poetry are 
thors Today and Yesterday" by Ku° |tZ 



"Fifty Modern Pacts" by Benet, ^ 
"The Serpent in the Wilderness" by ^ 
gar Lee Masters. . 

Other recent acquisitions are I s * * 
Coward's "Book of Plays," "The Fu^ 1 * 
Comes" by Beard and Smith. "Gr^' 
Men of Science" by Lennard, and H u ' 
zinga's "The Waning of the M^ 1 ' 
Ages." 

The librarians hope that the stude 11 
will take advantage of these val ua 
additions to the library. 



bu 
tic: 
v a 
sh 

it 
Co 




I 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1934 



PAGE THREE 



ke 

errio, 
nergy 

'. hash 
stuff 

sts j„ 
thev 



at- 



bush- 
i won- 

do to 
Divine 



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idence 



s that 

slouch 
better 

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:icago. 
r that 
such, 
s bur- 

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Seventeen athletes, including four 
varsity captains, were last week declared 
ineligible for intercollegiate sports con- 
tests at Franklin and Marshall College, 
j ue to scholastic standing. We heartily 
agree with Dr. Henry H. Apple, presi- 
dent of the college in taking such ac- 
tion, and believe that in a small school 
j n which athletes do receive scholar- 
ships nevertheless, said athletes should 
he made to meet the required averages 
r such action as taken by Dr Apple. 



Gettysburg's Bullets defeated Johnny 
Utz's Muhlenberg Mules on Tuesday 
night and definitely clinched the Eastern 
Pennsylvania Collegiate League title for 
t he third consecutive year. This is an 
accomplishment for which the Battle- 
field school should be justly proud. Hen 
Bream always puts out a mighty fine ag- 
gregation of basketeers. 



There are rumors afloat on the camp- 
us that one of Lebanon Valley's senior 
athletes has snared a prominent coach- 
ing position in the New Jersey scholas- 
tic ranks. 



Now that spring is just around the 
corner and the snow is still flying, we 
find many college baseball coaches call- 
ing for indoor practice. Lebanon Valley 
will again have a team in the Eastern 
Collegiate baseball league and should 
be one of the strong contenders for the 
crown. Coach Mylin has a host of vet- 
eran maierial at hand. 



The coming Loughran-Carnera fight 
is a much talked-of affair on the camp- 
us, moreso from the fact that Raymond 
"Pat" Patrizio is a personal friend of 
'Ac present champion. However, there 
are many who doubt if Pat's champion 
will come through when he meets the 
veteran Tommy in Miami on February 



Will or will not Coach Mylin go to 
bucknell is another question of concern 
to the student body. Also, what will be 
the status of athletes at Lebanon Valley 
m a couple of years? Who knows? 



Wednesday night's loss to F. 6C M. 
gives the Flying Dutchmen »n even 
break in league competition. No, the 
Blue and White did no: havo an off 
ni ght. F. & M. had an on right, or 
should we say they hav.> h:id luite a few 
°f them lately. 



We would also like >j s.i / j &< we like 
f he sports write-ups given *o I ebanon 
Val 'ey this season by the Harrisburg 
P a Pers, and would like tc thank them 
for the ,ame. 

There nas k een sorne oituism of the 
^ebanon Valley courtmen in their last 
ree losses. Where is our championship 
te am? etc. are the questions. We did 
^°t^have a championship team to begin 
We had a team of veterans, a 
^arn that always fights and gives all it 
as but we had no team of individual 

a fi S ' n ° c ' lam P' ons - They have put up 
ght m every game, losing three times 
a mar gin of only one point. Give 
•-reait. i hey deserve it. 



C RAY HANSEN TELLS OF 
GANGLAND CONDITIONS 



Coach Mylin's sanctum sanctorum, or 

, e on the second floor of the Ad. 
u 'ldine U i 
tion undergone quite a renova- 

v arn . ^ n Edition to being painted and 

s k„n S ea "' lt has been decorated with 
"Us k t 

rn an '„.. et8 > overseas pictures, Ger- 

it > er boten" signs, etc., until now 

co.t^l> an armory more than a 

° hs offi ce . 



(Continued from Page One) 

seven kidnaping cases, amounting any- 
where from #10,000 to #75,000. "The 
gangsters have drawn up a new policy 
of kidnaping which provides for ran- 
soms of #1,000 to #5,000, so that the 
victims themselves will be able to pay 
immediately, a skillful method which' 
places every citizen in the face of dan- 
ger. If is true that justice has "started 
a ranguine drive against crime," having 
solved twenty-two of the twenty-three 
major criminal cases and having pun- 
ished twenty-one; but it is likewise true 
that the members of this organization 
arc clever, having many ways of intimi- 
dating prosecuting witnesses and incur- 
ring delay of justice. 

"Pens" Are Crime Schools 

Mr. Hansen gave vivid descriptions of 
certain features of the famous "Factor 
kidnaping case" of Chicago, as well as 
many of his own personal experiences 
with criminals. 

He concluded with the point that 
"home life in America is gone, and 
penal institutions are no longer correc- 
tive, but actual schools for the perpe 
tration of crime." 



Flying Dutchmen 
Lose To Dickinson 



FINAL SCORE IS 35 TO 34 

Goal in Closing Seconds of Play 
Wins for Carlisle Red Devil 
Basketeers 

Last Thursday night the Flying Dutch 
men met the Dickinson Red Devils in 
Lebanon Valley's only non-league game 
of the season and lost in a hair-raising 
game in the closing minutes, 35 to 34 
Dickinson has been undefeated on their 
home court for the past two seasons. 

Captain Kennedy was the hero of the 
gagme for the Dickinson squad when 
he sank a field goal in the last fifteen 
seconds of play to send the Red Devils 
out in front by one point. 

The Red and White led at half-time 
18 to 13, but Lebanon Valley, led by 
Rust, Miller and Barthold, went on a 
scoring spree, and in the last period 
the score read 34 to 30 in favor of the 
Flying Dutchmen. With two minutes 
to play, Steel, Dickinson substitute, sank 
a twin-pointer and a foul shot to bring 
the score to 33-34. In the last fifteen 
seconds, Kennedy scored the goal that 
won for the Red Devils. 

"Bee" Rust, Lebanon Valley forward, 

was high scorer of the game, with an 
11 point total. WHsoi. led the scoring 
r or Dickinson, with 10 points. 

Lineup: 

Dickinson 

G. F. Pts 

Kennedy, f. 3 3 S 

Wilson, f - - 3 4 10 

Sinney, f - 1 1 

Eaton, c — 1 

Hughs, g. ... _.- 1 2 

James, g. 2 

Steele, g 1 1 



Totals 



12 11 



35 



Valleyites Lose To 
F.&M. Basketeers 



Lebanon Valley 

G. F. Pts. 

Harthold, f. _ 2 3 7 

Patrizo, f. 1 1 3 

Rust, f 5 111 

Miller, c - 3 1 7 

Rose, c. 

Light, g 1 2 

Sponaugle, g 

Smith, g - _ 2 4 



SUBSTITUTE HAS ON NIGHT 

Tap-off Difficulties Serious As Lan- 
caster Team Sinks Shots From 
All Angles 



The Flying Dutchmen fell farther be- 
hind in the Eastern Collegiate League on 
Wednesday night when they lost their 
third straight league encounter at the 
hands of the fast-stepping F. Si M. 
Nevonians by a 41 to 32 score. 

The eagle eye of Johnny Moore, sub- 
stitute Nevonian forward, inability of 
Lebanon Valley to get the tap-off from 
Wenrich, towering F. Si M. pivotman, 
and again only a fair percentage in foul 
shooting cost the Blue and White the 
game. Moore could not be stopped 
shooting from all angles of the floor, 
caging eight double-deckers and two 
fouls for a grand total of 18 points. 
Barthold was runner-up in scoring hon- 
ors with 14 counters to his credit. 

Wenrich, center for F. Si M., was a 
thorn in the Valley offense, getting the 
tap-off from center on practically every 
occasion. This has been a Blue and 
White fault in every game to date. 

Light, Williams and Smith played 
good defensive games but were unable 
to check the onslaught of Moore and 
Jacobs, two of the best forwards in the 
league. 

Lineups: 

Lebanon Valley 
G. 

Barthold, f „ __ 5 

Patrizio, f 

Rust, f 1 

Rose, c 

Miller, c 2 

Williams, g 

Light, g — - 1 

Smith, g 3 



Pts. 
14 

2 
1 
5 




Totals --12 8 

P. and M. 

G. F. 

Moore, f - 8 2 

Jacobs, f 3 4 

Wenrich, c 1 

Haller, g _ 2 1 

Stolarz, g 

Roddy, g 2 2 



Pts. 
18 
10 



16 



Totals - 

Referee — Greiner. 



FRESHMEN LOSE, 44-21 



41 



Totals - 14 



34 



On a preliminary 


to the 


F. Si 


M.- 


Lebanon Valley game on 


Wednesday 


night, the Nevonian 


Frosh ran wild to 


win against the Blue 


and White 


year- 


ling outfit by a 44 to 


21 score. 




Lineups: 








L. V. C. 


Fro»h 








G. 


F. 


Pts. 




1 





2 




1 





2 


Kinney, f 


2 





4 













Billet, c 


2 


3 


f 









2 


Snell, g 


_ 1 


2 


4 


Totals , 


8 


5 


21 



Blue Belles Beat 
Keystone Collegians 

SMITH SCORES 20 POINTS 



F. 8C M. Frosh 

G. F. Pts. 

Jaeger, f - — 7 1 15 

Langford, f , - 

Medwick. f 1 1 3 

Hughes, f _ 

Sponaugle, c - 6 1 13 

Pew, c _ 

Hummer, g 2 4 

Rogers, g -r.- 10 2 

Apple, g ---r-—r r— - — - 3 17 



Final Count 31-16 As L. V. Lassies 
Pack Away Another 
Win 



The girls' basketball team played a 
very successful game in the Annville 
High School gymnasium Saturday af- 
ternoon, February 17. They defeated 
their opponents — the Keystone team 
from Myerstown which includes college 
graduates who are now in the teaching 
or business professions — 31-16. 

The forward section of the Lebanon 
Valley team is still suffering from the 
temporary loss of Gem Gemmill. How- 
ever, Marjorie Smith played a good 
game, scoring 20 of the 31 points. An- 
na Krebs starred during the first half of 
the game. 

Anna Orth and Mabel Chamberlain 



played a steady, but rather slow, game 
in the center positions. The Weirick sis- 
ters successfully held in check the Key- 
stone forwards. 

The next home game will be Friday 
afternoon with Juniata, which team will 
travel here after playing at Elizabeth- 
town Thursday evening. Saturday af- 
ternoon the team will play at home 
again, this time with Penn Hall. It is 
expected that these teams will give the 
Blue Belles much competition. 

Lineups: 

Lebanon Valley 

A. Krebs R. F O. Line 

M. Smith L. I .... L. Behney 

A. Orth... C G. Swanger 

M. Chamberlain..S. C K. Kutz 

C. Weirick ......... R. G. L. Deck 

I. Weirick L. G R. Shaeffer 

Referee: Miss Moyer. 



RUTLEDGES AWAY 



Last Wednesday Professor and 
Mrs. Rutledge were called to Ottum- 
wa, Iowa, because of the death of 
Mrs. RUtledge's father. While they 
were there, Professor Rutledge be- 
came ill, and is unable to return 
home this week. 



Totals 



20 



44 




THE WHOLE WEEK'S 
BRIGHTER 

1/ You Telephone Home! 

When the skies fall (as they fall on all of 
us) . . . when college life palls (as it will at 
times) . . . "talk it out" with the Home Folks 
by telephone. To hear their voice is next best 
to seeing them. 

How quickly you'll snap back to normal! 
A telephone "voice visit" can brighten your 
whole week. That's why so many college stu- 
dents telephone Home at a regular practice, 
once a week at least. 



FOR LOWEST COST 
J GREATEST EASE . . . 




an 



Use the inexpensive Station to Station serv- 
ive when you telephone Home. (By mak- 
ing a "date" the Family is sure to be there.) 

Call after 8:30 P.M., when the low Night 
Rates are in effect. 

Just give the Operator your home telephone 
number and "hold the line." 

Charges may be reversed. 
THE BELL TELEPHONE COMPANY OF PENNSYLVANIA 
II— * 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1934 



Delphian and Kalo 
To Give Coward Play 

"HAY FEVER" SELECTED 



Noted Campus Actors to Appear in 
Drama — Shorter Than 
Usual 



Delphian and Kalozetean Literary So- 
cieties will present Noel Coward's "Hay 
Fever" on March 23, the time of Kalo's 
anniversary. The cast selected is: Da- 
vid, Allen Buzzell; Judith, Mary Gos- 
sard; Myra, Ida Hall; Simon, George 
Sherk; Richard, Charles Hauck; Sorrel, 
Catherine Wagner; Jackie, June Ging- 
rich; Sandy, Charles Furlong; Clara, 
Gem Gemmill. 

Noel Coward will be remembered for 
his famous "Cavalcade" and more re- 
cent "Design for Living," which starred 
Gary Cooper, Miriam Hopkins and 
Fredric March. The "Book-of-the- 
Month" Club recently selected "Play 
Parade," a group of his plays, among 
which may be found "Hay Fever." The 
college library has added this book to 
its shelves. 

Although "Hay Fever" has been at- 
tempted by high school seniors, it should 
be capably handled by the two societies. 
This marks the first time Kalo and Del- 
phian have gone together in play pro- 
duction. The essential reason is to satis- 
fy an economy measure. Whereas in 
former years the anniversary play given 
by the male society was frequently over 
two hours in length, this season a very 
light and swift, sophisticated comedy is 
to be enacted. It will be of sufficient 
brevity to eliminate the lag of interest 
usually seen at the end of the first hour. 



Wrestlers Lose To 

Nevonian Jayvees 



The wrestlers engaged in their third 
meet of the season last Saturday night 
when they met a strong Franklin and 
Marshall junior varsity team at Lancas- 
ter. Despite the fact that the Collegians 
were successful in winning but one of 
the eight matches, they nevertheless 
showed that they are steadily improving 
and are gaining a better knowledge of 
the sport. In their first season with a 
squad of inexperienced men, the grap- 
plers have met some of the strongest op- 
position in their class in this section of 
the country. The York Y. M. C. A., 
particularly Wyoming Seminary and 
Fmnklin and Marshall teams all have 
men of championship calibre and men 
with years of experience at the sport. 

The only collegian who emerged vic- 
torious was Houtz in the unlimited class. 

ing Kong" had little trouble in pin- 
ning his man in two minutes and thir- 
teen seconds, despite the fact that there 
was very little difference in weight. 
"Russ" Jenkins, wrestling his first match 
in the 155 pound class, showed up very 
well against Werner, former captain of 
the F. & M. academy squad. The rest 
of the grapplers except Beaver lost on 
falls, but not before they had put up a 
commendable scrap with more experi- 
enced opponent's. 

115 lb. — Kutz defeated Buzzell on a 
fall in 3 minutes, 24 seconds. 

1 25 lb. — Ogden defeated Beaver on 
time advantage, 6 minutes, 18 seconds. 

135 lb. Hicks defeated Fridy on a fall 
in 2 minutes, 20 seconds. 

145 lb. — Nissley defeated Hershey on 
a fall in 1 minute, 57 seconds. 

155 lb. — Werner defeated Jenkins on 
a fall in 2 minutes, 32 seconds. 

165 lb. — Raab defeated Thompson on 
a fall in 4 minutes, 34 seconds. 

175 lb. — Lambert defeated Straub on 
a fall in 2 minutes, 45 seconds. 

Unlimited — Houtz defeated Musante 
on a fall in 2 minutes, 13 seconds. 



Favorites Survive 

In Pool Tournament 



The pool tournament has now pro- 
gressed through the second round, and 
before the passing of another week, an- 
other Lebanon Valley pool champion 
will have been crowned. With the grad- 
ual decrease of contestants through eli-' 
mination, the matches are beginning to 
stir up more interest among the spec- 
tators, and it is certain that the aspi- 
rants for the crown will produce some 
"classy shootin'." 

Thus far most of the favorites have 
survived except for "Willy" Fishburn, 
who was rather decisively defeated by 
Frank Boran to the tune of 50 to 29. 
"Chief" Umberger put up an interesting 
struggle before bowing to Klitch by the 
close score of 50 to 43, and Earnest 
continued his triumphant and decisive 
victories by easily defeating "Mike" Ka- 
noff, 50 to 8 in a listless battle. In the 
otehr second round encounters, Culla- 
ther defeated Barthold 50 to 34, Peiffer 
defeated Schwartz 50 to 46, Wampler 
defeated Fridinger in a close match, 50 
to 42, and "Wib" Shroyer easily elimi- 
nated Williams, 50 to 15. A close third 
round match is expected when Peiffer 
and Earnest, two heavy favorites for the 
crown, match cues. 



Campus Cuts 



GESUNDHEIT! That's a fine pic- 
ture to have before a person while he is 
trying to think of something for this 
column. . . . Where did you get it, Kem- 
per? 



It's hard to imagine that there are 
two chaps on the campus who wagered 
a dollar on the flip of a coin. . . . "Heads 
I win, tails you owe me a dollar," said 
the first. . . . The second assented and 
flipped the coin. ... It fell, tail up, so 
he calmly paid over the dollar he owed 
according to the conditions of the bet. 



If there is anything past oblivion 
we'll nominate the chap who kicks a 
panel out of the door and then crawls 
through the opening to gain admission 
to his room. 



Then there was the coach who attend- 
ed practice at least occasionally. 



Where is the error in this sentence? 
.... So the students attended the lecture 
in the overheated classroom and paid 
attention to the professor. 



The scene is somewhere in the woods 
north of Annville. The weather is fair, 
and the day is just the type that turns 
a young man's fancy as the spring, al- 
though it is still winter-time. The char- 
acters are a couple of impressionable 
children. The atmosphere — migud, how 
romantic! 

Krone — "If I were a poet, I'd write a 
poem; if I were a musician, I'd compose 
a song; if I were a painter, I'd paint a 
picture." 

Velma — "Yes, and if you were a lov- 
er, you'd kiss me." 



Our undercover man in- 
forms us that high school dis- 
ciplinary measures are being 
invoked upon the least provo- 
cation by the Business Ad. de- 
partment. Tch, tch, tch; for 
full particulars see le pauvre 
Todd. 



Matrimony, before long will be listed 
in curricula of American universities, 
two University of Wisconsin educators 
believe. Such a course, they say, will 
include, for instance, the proper men- 
tal attitude to assume when hubby 
doesn't come home and the dinner grows 
cold. In the event that another woman 
enters the picture or other matrimonial 
crises occur, the scientific procedure 
would be offered to overcome the diffi- 
culty. Such schools pioneering in giving 
a course like this would naturally pride 
themselves on the rarity of divorces 
among their alumni. "If the family is 
going to be preserved we must educate 
people to maintain happy relationships 
cf husband and wife." 



FROSH DEFEAT LEBANON 

BUSINESS COLLEGE 



(Continued from Page One) 



points to gain a short lead at half time. 
1 he lar.t two quarters found the Frosh 
holding their opponents at bay and oc- 
casionally tossing in a goal to add to 
iheir own rcore. The Business College 
team wps outplayed in every department 
of the game, while in the later stages of 
the fray, rhe Frosh simply coasted to vic- 
tory. Kinney and Snell were the high 
tcorers for 'he Frosh, while Fernsler led 
the losers, scoring with 12 points. 
Lineup: 

L. V. Frosh 



Billet, c 



Totals 



G. 


F. 


Pts. 


6 





12 


4 





8 


1 





2 


- 4 





8 


- 4 


2 


10 


19 


2 


40 


College 




G. 


F. 


Pts. 


1 





2 


1 





2 


6 





12 


1 


1 


3 


2 


1 


5 


11 


2 


24 



"Reading is nothing more than a sub- 
stitute for thought of one's own." — 
Schopenhauer. 



"In a word, women are big children 
all their life long." — Schopenhauer. 




DINE and DANCE 

AT THE 

GREEN TERRACE 

ONE MILE EAST OF ANNVILLE 




WE INVITE 
L. V. C. 
STUDENTS 
TO TRY OUR 
DELICIOUS 
FOODS. 



Doutr 



l g Always Reliable ^ 



Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 




CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS 
PRESENT CHAPEL SERVICE 



(Continued from Page One) 



Seated with Rev. Barnhart on the 
stage were Margaret Kohler and Allan 
Ranck, representing the Y. W. and Y. 
M. C. A. Miss Kohler read the scrip- 
ture lesson for the morning from Mat- 
thew, the sixth chapter, and the verses 
wherein Christ gave His disciples in- 
structions how to pray. Mr. Ranck then 
led the audience in prayer. 

Atmospheric Prelude 

During the course of the program, 
Helen Summy delighted the students and 
faculty with a sacred vocal solo. She 
was accompanied at the piano by Mrs. 
Bender. Also assisting in the music was 
Dorothy Ely, who played the organ. A 
soft and dreamy prelude was very suc- 
cessful in bringing the audience to a 
quiet and pensive mood. She also pre- 
sented the postlude at the close of the 
morning's program. 



"Even if a person swallows a jug of 
synthetic gin and runs me down with his 
Ford, that too is a part of life, and I 
must learn to be spry and take care of 
myself on the streets." — Logan Clenden- 
ning. 



FLOWERS 

FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

BERNSTEIN'S 

LEBANON, PENNA. 



SANDWICHES SODAS 

EAT AT ROEMIG'S 

DELICIOUS HOME-MADE 
ICE CREAM 



J- E. GIPPLE 

Fire Insurance and Real Estate 
1351 Market Street 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



KREAMER BROS. 



EASY ELECTRIC WASHERS 
GAS STOVES AND RANGES 
RUGS AND LINOLEUMS 
PICTURE FRAMING 



Furniture - - Undertaking 



Phone 14 4 ANNVILLE, PA. 



SPECIAL CARDS 
SPECIAL STATIONERY 
and a SPECIAL WELCOME 
. . . at . . . 

BOLLMAN'S 

Book and Stationery Store 

33 S. 8th St. - LEBANON, PA. 



ANNVILLE, 



PENNA. 



THURSDAY 8c FRIDAY 

H. G. Wells' 
Invisible Man 

with 

GLORIA STUART CLAUDE RAINS 



SATURDAY & MONDAY 

Dinner at Eight 

MARIE DRESSLER 
JEAN HARLOW 

JOHN BARRYMORE 

LIONEL BARRYMORE 



TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY 
ALICE BRADY 

i n 

Stage Mother 



BEST SHORT ATTRACTIONS 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

A&PTEA CO. 

C. H. SHEARER, Mgr. 



FOR QUALITY 

Baked Products 

PATRONIZE 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



20% DISCOUNT ON ALL MER- 
CHANDISE DURING FEBRUARY 

JOHN HIRSH 

DEPARTMENT STORE 
9-11 W. Main St. ANNVILLE 



D. L. Saylor & Sons 
CONTRACTORS 

LUMBER and COAL 
Annville, Pennsylvania 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. B ASHORE 



LEBANON. PENNSYLVANIA 



"COME AND GET A COKE" 
FOR A BITE or a BANQUET 



TRY 



THE PENNWAY 




GRIMM'S BOOK STORE 

SPECIAL 
CROWN SET 
CLIONIAN PINS--$12.00 



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on 
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Read KrumbiegePs 
Article 




Mylin's Last Year 
At L. V. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



VOL. X 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, MARCH 1, 1934 



No. 23 



Dr. Paul S. Wagner 
Improving Rapidly 

VISITED BY L. V. FRIENDS 

Head of Math Department Ex- 
pected Home in About 
One Week 



SENIORS GUESTS 
AT LYNCH HOME 



Word comes from the New York 
Hospital that from all indications the 
condition of Dr. Wagner, who has had a 
serious brain operation, seems to be very 
bright, showing a continuous improve- 
ment. Dr. Lynch, Prof. Grimm, Mr. 
Umberger and several other students 
have seen Dr. Wagner personally over 
the weekend and they all agree that he 
seems to be in the best of spirits. Quot- 
ing Dr. Lynch "his optimism is doing him 
more good than medicine." 

The operation performed on Dr. Wag- 
ner was of a very dangerous and stren- 
uous sort. He was under the knife six 
hours and was given only a local anes- 
thetic. A blood transfusion was neces- 
sary to conserve his strength. However, 
the professor has come through with fly- 
ing colors. On Friday of last week he 
was sitting up in bed cheerfully talking 
with his visitors and enjoying the cards 
and flowers that students, faculty, and 
other friends have sent him. The cards 
he had standing upright on a sort of 
shelf at the foot of his bed so that he 
could see them from where he lay. 

From present indications Dr. Wagner 
will be brought home either at the end 
of this week or the beginning of next 
week. He sends his regards to the stud- 
ent body and the students and faculty 
once more unanimously join in sending 
Dr. Wagner their best wishes and hopes 
for the speediest of recoveries. 



DEBATING TEAMS DIVIDE 
WITH ELIZABETHTOWN 



The men's negative debating team won 
a second successive victory by defeat- 
ing their affirmative opponents from 
Elizabethtown College last Friday night, 
February 23. The debate was conduct- 
ed before a large and appreciative audi- 
en ce in room 16 of the Administration 
building- instead of in Philo Hall as pre- 
viously announced. The judges award- 
ed the local team a 3-0 decision. 

The men's affirmative team journeyed 
to Eliabethtown the same evening and in 
their first debate of the season they lost 
their opponents in a very close deci- 
sion. At Elizabethtown only two judges 
a PPeared. I n the face of this difficulty it 
^ as decided, before the debate began, to 
avc the judges vote upon a list of 36 
Points each, and then declare that team 

e dinner which had the largest num- 
^ er of points after everything had been 

non ' By a SCOrC ° f 37 ~ 35 the Leba ~ 
°?r debaters were nosed out. 

(Continued on Page 4, Column 1) 



Dorothy Ely Leads 
Singing In Chapel 

Th 

e c ' a ? s of conducting is still 

^eek" 9 ° n the ' r chapel P ro i ect - Last 
. e Mr. Dale Roth, a musician 

l ecJ ^ Junior class, most capably 
serv - - 6 music during the morning 
Ely' 008 ' and this week Miss Dorothy 
stud 9 or Public school music 
how k iS lowing the collegians 
she expects to lead her choruses 
Sp ' e ndid n these members have 

itig, re s«lts in the general sing- 



On Thursday afternoon, February 22, 
the seniors were guests at a delightful 
tea given by Dr. and Mrs. C. A. Lynch 
at their home. In the receiving line with 
Mrs. Lynch were Mrs. Green, dean of 
women, and Mrs. Derickson. The so- 
phomore girls provided the entertain- 
ment and helped to serve. 

Miss Helen Summy opened the pro- 
gram with one of her delightful songs, 
"Cario Mio Ben." Her accompanist was 
Miss Irma Kieffer. After this number. 
Miss Louise Gillan gave, in her usual 
charming manner, a boy's version of 
George Washington's youth. The next 
feature was a contralto solo, "Drifting 
On" by Kountz, sung by Miss Char- 
lotte Stabley, whose performances al- 
ways merit high praise. Miss Summy 
obliged with a reguest number, "Florian" 
by Godard, which met with the instant 
appropal of her listeners. The program 
was brought to a close with the singing 
of several college songs. 

Delicious refreshments were served 
and jig-saw puzzles, block puzzles, ana- 
grams, and checkers— not to mention 
"Foxey" — provided amusement for the 
rest of the afternoon. 

Those sophomore girls who helped 
serve were Louise Gillan, Louise Shear- 
er, Charlotte Stabley, Helen Summy, Ir- 
ma Kieffer and Rae Anna Reber. 

This was the first of the series of teas 
to be given the students this spring. 
Mrs. Lynch will be hostess to the mem- 
bers of the junior class this afternoon, 
and the freshman girls will serve. 



Dr, Richie Speaks 
At Vesper Service 

EXPLAINS "WHY OF THE Y" 



Bible Professor Tells of Early 
History of Christian 
Association 



The Y.M.C.A. Vesper Service was 
addressed by Dr. G. A. Richie on Sun- 
day evening in the Y room. After sev- 
eral songs and a period of devotions 
which was led by Elwood Needy, Dr. 
Richie was introduced. His subject was 
"The Why of the Y", and being one of 
the faculty advisors of that organiation, 
he was well able to handle the subject. 
As an introduction he gave some of the 
past history of the Y.M.C.A. and a 
sketch of the importance which it has 
possessed in its various phases of service 
and work. He showed its value during 
the war, its great resources now in the 
way of buildings and men, and the great 
purpose for which it exists. 

One of the strongest points of Dr. 
Richie's discussion was the statement of 
the fact that of the four-fold purpose 
which the Y commonly stands for, two 
are already served by the school, the 
development of the mind and the body. 
The two remaining should be taken care 
of especially by the association on the 
campus. These are the social and the 
religious influences in the lives of the 
students in the dorm. "As long as there 
is any one who needs to be told of the 
Christian in the college, the Y has a 
definite purpose," he said. 

After Dr. Richie had finished, he dis- 



Debaters Lose Pair 
To Lincoln Teams 



OREGON SYSTEM IS USED 



Vote Unanimous In Home Con- 
test — Audience Decides 
At Lincoln Debate 



The men's debating teams engaged in 
one of their hardest debates of the sea- 
son on Tuesday evening when they met 
the representatives of Lincoln Univer- 
sity in a dual encounter at Annville and 
at Lincoln University. The latter school 
is for negro youths and is located on 
the Philadelphia-Baltimore pike, near 
Oxford. It is especially well known for 
its splendid debators which it turns out 
each year, and in recent years their stu- 
dents have built up an enviable forensic 
reputation for their alma mater. 

The Lebanon Valley affirmative, de- 
bating at home against Lincoln's nega- 
tive team, was completely overwhelmed 
by a 3-0 decision of the judges, while 
the local negative team which travelled 
for this debate, met its first defeat of the 
season, losing an audience decision by 
10-5. 

This debate was the first of the season 
to be held on the Oregon plan. The 
Lincoln University teams were much ex- 
perienced in this line, while to the Leba- 
non Valley debators it was something 
new and different. The lack of experi- 
ence in this type of debate was the most 
important hindrance to the local teams' 
cause, especially in the debate on this 
campus. 

The largest audience of this season 
attended the debate in Philo Hall. The 
Oregon plan involves cross questioning 
periods of ten minutes for each side and 
it is this feature which makes the Oregon 
style of debate so interesting, and which 
undoubtedly brought out so big an audi- 
ence last night. Debating enthusiasts 
will have three more chances to see this 
plan in operation when Lebanon Valley 
meets Western Maryland, Westminster, 
and the University of Pennsylvania. 

Judges for Tuesday evening's debate 
were: Miss Mary Witmer, teacher of 
English in Harding Junior High School, 
Lebanon; Rev. A. L. Davidson, Leba- 
non; and James Atkins, attorney, Leba- 
non. Prof. A. H. M. Stonecipher served 
as chairman of the proceedings. 



Drexel Dragons Bow 
To Lebanon Valley 

FINAL SCORE IS 45 TO 44 



Rust Is Big Gun In Flying 
Dutchmen's Attack — Ex- 
tra Period Needed 



Lebanon Valley's Flying Dutchmen, 
with Bee Rust dropping them in from all 
angles of the court, barely nosed out 
the Drexel Dragons in Lebanon on Sat- 
urday night, 45-44, in one of the most 
bitterly contested Eastern Pennsylvania 
League games all season. 

Knapp scored five field goals to lead 
a first half Dragon attack that placed the 
visitors ahead 22-12 at half time. This 
half was a slow affair, many shots be- 
ing missed by both teams. 

Lebanon Valley, with Barthold and 
Rust in the leading roles, deadlocked the 
count at 37 all when the whistle blew at 
the close of the regular playing time. 
Rust, who replaced Patrizio at forward, 
gave a second-half exhibition of long 

(Continued on Page 4, Column 3) 



QUITTIE POLL IS 
HELD IN CHAPEL 



Who are to be the victors in the 
popularity contest sponsored by the fea- 
ture editors of the 1935 Quittapahila 
staff? Are you the most intelligent or 
the best all-around worker? Wait for 
the results to be announced in this class' 
year book. Charles Hauck presented the 
project before the chapel group Wednes- 
day morning, February 21. The ushers 
passed out the ballots and the students 
for a few hasty minutes concentrated on 
the difficult task of choosing their can- 
didates in a fair and unbiased manner. 
During the same day these votes were 
counted and recorded. Who are the 
winners? Well, that is intended to be a 
secret until the Quittie makes its debut. 
The New York photographer, braving 
storm and snow, was on the campus to 
take full-length photographs of these 
chosen students; so this in itself will be 
a new and interesting feature to look 
forward to in the completed Quittapa- 
hilla. Just a few glimpses into these 
votes. Were you aware of the fact that 
"Scoop" Feeser has certainly earned a 
worthy name for himself as the "best 
all-around worker"^- the C. W. A. paint- 
ing job must have been in his favor. 
The faculty seemed to be especially 
strong as the best dancers, while Frank 
Cullather ranked high among the best- 
looking girls. But— no more, that would 
be telling. 



Billiards Experts 
Advance In Tourney 

EARNEST-CULLATHER WIN 



Cue Artists Anticipate Display 
Of Pyrotechnics in Final 
Meet 

The third round of the pool tourna- 
ment was completed Monday of this 
week, when Paul Peiffer and William 
Earnest met in what was expected to be 
one of the closest matches of the entire 
tourney. Sentiment was evenly divided 
concerning the outcome of the battle, but 
it was soon decided in the half hour con- 
test with Earnest far in the lead. The 
game was one of safe plays and with 
few spectacular shots. "Bill" was able 
to make the shots which were open for 
him consistently, while Peiffer seemed to 
be scorned by Dame Fortune. The final 
score of the match was 50 to 14. 

This victory completed the list which 
is to meet in the fourth round. The two 
matches line Boran against Cullather, 
and Earnest against Shroyer. In the 
75-point game between Boran and Cul- 
lather in this round, Cullather came out 
the victor in a fairly closely contested 
game, the final score of which was 75 
to 60. This victory leaves one match to 
be played to decide who will meet in 
the finals. Earnest seems to be the fav- 
orite for that game, so that he and Cul- 
lather are expected to meet in the finals. 

This final match is anticipated in the 
dormitory with interest, and will be close, 
according to all opinion. In the first 
three matches which each played, Earn- 
est's opponents made only 34 points as 
compared to the 104 which the opponents 
of Cullather were able to obtain. 

On Wednesday afternoon, Earnest 
defeated Shroyer, 76-64, in a tight game. 



Hooks Mylin To Be 
Coach of Bucknell 

SUCCESSOR NOT CHOSEN 



Present Valley Mentor Has 
Compiled; Splendid Record 
During Eleven Years 



Mylin is going to Bucknell. This is 
the final news to the many rumors 
which have been floating over the Leba- 
non Valley campus for the last month. 
"Hooks" this week signed a Bison con- 
tract to succeed Carl Snavely, who re- 
signed a month ago to take up the coach- 
ing reins at the University of North 
Carolina. 

Mylin was elected Saturday night 
when the Bucknell athletic council met 
in Philadelphia and definitely accepted 
Monday over long distance telephone. 
He will sign a three year contract for a 
salary rumored to be in the neighbor- 
hood of $5000, with an additional 
amount for baseball which he will coach, 
starting in 1935. He will remain at 
Lebanon Valley until after baseball sea- 
son this spring. 

The Bucknell athletic council will join 
with Mylin in selecting one assistant to 
replace Max Reed, who went with 
Snavely to North Carolina. This assis- 
tant will probably be Jerry Frock, ex- 
Lebanon Valley star, who assisted My- 
lin with the Lebanon Valley gridsmen 
in 1927-1928. Mose Quinn will be My- 
lin's other Bison assistant. However, 
there are some reports that Frock will 
apply for Mylin's present position. 

Hooks received both the master and 
bachelor of arts degrees from Franklin 
and Marshall College. He coached at 
Massanutten Military Academy in Vir- 
ginia, then went to Iowa State College 
for four years. During the World War 
he was a captain in charge of all ath- 
letics in the 79th Division, A. E. F. 

Lebanon Valley has had an excellent 
small college record under Mylin's re- 
gime at Annville. His victory over 
Brown's national championship team in 
1927 was his most outstanding victory. 
It is interesting to note that Mylin 
coached at Lebanon Valley, while Carl 
Snavely, his predecessor at Bucknell, 
was a Blue and White graduate. 

The "Old Sport," writing in the Phila- 
delphia Inquirer, says of Mylin: 

The Old Sport wishes to congratulate 
Bucknell University athletic heads on 
their wise selection of E. E. (Hooks) 
Mylin, former Lebanon Valley athletic 
director, as the coach of the Bison foot- 
ball team next fall. 

Mylin has served with distinction at 
Lebanon Valley for the past ten years, 

(Continued on Page 4, Column 2) 



Music Students' 

Recital Tuesday 

The conservatory announces the 
next student recital which will be 
given on Tuesday, March 6, in Engle 
Hall. 

At this recital the following people 
will appear on the program: Misses 
Matilda Bonanni, Martha Elser, Fran- 
ces Shearer, and Beatrice Fink, who 
who will play the piano numbers; 
Miss Rae Anna Reber, who will give 
a concert number; Miss Oleta Dietrich 
and Mr. Jack Schuler, who will give 
violin selections; Misses Ida C. Hall, 
and Helen Summy, who will sing, and 
Messrs. Robert Heath and Robert 
Shadel, who will play the organ. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 1, 1934 



Viz Coilegiemte 

ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Edmund Umberger, '34. . .Editor-in-Chief 
Kathryn Mowrey, '34. .. .Associate Editor 
Richard Schreiber, '34 . .Managing Editor- 
Richard Baus, '37 Asst. Man. Editor 



THE FORUM 



REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Martha Kreider, '34 
Allan Ranck, '34 
Elizabeth Schaak, '34 
Helen Earnest, '35 
Sylvia Evelev, '36 

David Yake, '36 General Reporters 

Christine Gruber, '34 Conservatory 

DeWitt Essick, '34 

George Hiltner, '35 Athletics 

Catherine Wagner, '35 Alumni 

Clyde Mentzer, '34 Philokosmian 

Robert Cassel, '36 Kalozetean 

Jane Shellenberger, '36 Clionian 

Marietta Ossl, *35 Delphian 

. BUSINESS STAFF 

Jack Todd, '34 Business Manager 

Kenneth Sheaffer, '35. Asst. Bus. Manager 
Allen Buzzell, '34. . .Circulation Manager 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 



Single Copies 6 cents 

Subscription $1-00 per year 



Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter, under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



THURSDAY, MARCH 1, 1934 



A CHANGE 



The W. S. G. A. Board is to be con- 
gratulated on its change of policy. Sev- 
eral rules have been combined, others 
changed, and a few entirely eliminated. 
These changes make possible a complete 
knowledge and understanding of the 
rules. 

It is fitting that these new measures 
should be put on trial for the remainder 
of the semester. During this period an 
adequate trial of their efficiency can be 
attained. 

With less complex rules, it is apparent 
that these rules can be enforced with 
much greater efficiency. There is a 
quality of fairness expressed in the new 
measures which should enlist the support 
of all women students. Here's to the 
success of the new order. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



Mr. and Mrs. Ernest A. Seele, of 7 
Coolidge Place, Hackensack, New Jer- 
sey, and The Reservation, East Long 
Branch, New Jersey, announce the en- 
gagement of their daughter, Lorraine, to 
Elliot F. MacDonald, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Adam F. MacDonald, of 8 Ro- 
maine Avenue, Garden Suburbs, May- 
wood, New Jersey. Miss Seele is a 
former student of L.V.C., class of 32, 
and is at present employed as personal 
secretary to F. J. Scarr, president of the 
F. J. Scarr, Consulting Engineer, Inc. 
Mr. MacDonald is connected with the 
Stock Clearing Corp. of New York City. 
A definite date has not been set for the 
wedding. 



Prof. Rutledge, of the Conservatory, 
has returned to his duties this week, hav- 
ing recovered from his recent illness. 



TYPE CHANGE 



A new type face, Medieval, is used in 
the body of La Vie for this issue, in 
place of the old body type, Cloister. 
Readers of La Vie are invited to express 
their opinion of the change in type face. 



Former La Vie Editor Contri 
butes Information On 
Present German Condi- 
tions — Finds That Socia- 
lists and Communists 
Suffer More Persecutions 
Than Do Jews. 



Editor of La Vie: 

Knowing readers of the La Vie to be 
interested in politics and international af- 
fairs, I am taking this opportunity of 
passing on to them some information re- 
garding Hitlerism which I obtained from 
a participant in the struggle that marked 
the present German Chancellor's path to 
power. At the same time I will seek to 
correct an impression regarding this sub- 
ject entertained not only by collegians, 
but by the American public as well. This 
is the importance of the Semitic question 
which I believe has received undue ex- 
aggeration. No doubt the Gveulmeldun- 
gen of the Jews are no longer swallowed 
wholesale, but this in the American mind 
is still the dominant conception of the 
Third Reich. 

It has now become an accepted fact 
that the Jews control to a considerable 
extent all of our large newspapers. Their 
position as the controllers of such was, 
in regard to disseminating information 
about Germany, extremely advantage- 
ous. As a result, we had tales of atroci- 
ties that rivalled those that came out of 
Belgium during the war of 1914. Of 
course no one will deny them the right 
to take up cudgels in behalf of their fel- 
lows, but they only told a part of the 
story. We saw the persecutions of the 
Jews, but what of the persecutions of the 
Socialists and Communists—the real ene- 
mies of Nazidom? Perhaps if the papers 
of their parties enjoyed a wider circula- 
tion this disparity of opinion would not 
exist. How many of us have seen such 
papers? No doubt, very few. Our press 
has for obvious reasons minimized the 
story of the workers and has given us a 
somewhat distorted picture. I will at- 
tempt to dispel this erroneous impression 
as simply as possible. 

Recently I met a man who had come 
from Germany a few short weeks ago. 
From him, I learned at first hand that 
which I had suspected for some time, to 
wit: that the Socialists and Communists 
had suffered more at the hands of the 
Nazis than the Jews. He was neither a 
Jew nor a Communist. In fact, he be- 
longed to no party, although he had in 
former years expressed Social Demo- 
cratic sympathies. As a consequence, he 
has been seized by the police and Nazis, 
since March 5, 1933, no less than ten 
times. He was subjected to innumerable,, 
indignities and it is no wonder that he is 
now drifting towards the Communistic 
belief. He is a man of firm character and 
independent spirit and one could easily 
see why he might have irritated im- 
petuous brown-shirts. 

His first arrest occurred shortly after 
Hitlers accession to power. He was re- 
turning home with his wife one night af- 
ter having attended a cinema, when four 
Nazis stepped out of an alley and 
stopped him. One pointed a revolver at 
his chest and another pointed one at his 
back while a third searched him. He 
was then taken to the local prison where 
he was interrogated and released, but 
not until he had signed a declaration 
proclaiming that he was no longer affili- 
ated with the Communist party. The 
fact that he had never been a member 
of that party made no difference. The 
ages of his zealous interceptors ranged 
from eighteen to twenty-two. The next 
time he was apprehended the occasion 
was more serious. He had left town for 
a few hours in order to visit relatives, 
but not without having registered the 
time of his departure, his destination, the 
purpose of his visit and the time of his 
return. During his absence a Nazi was 



slain near his house with the consequent 
result that he was met by a committee of 
the slain man's compatriots as he stepped 
off the train. Fortunately, the real as- 
sassins were caught before this investi- 
gation reached a more serious stage. 

However, the provocations for some 
of his arrests also have a ludicrous an- 
gle. Twice while he was crossing the 
market-place with packages in his hands 
he was taken to the city hall for ques- 
tioning while the packages were inspect- 
ed. The contents each time proved to 
be nothing more harmful than a bottle 
of wine, the sampling of which he ve- 
hemently protested, and a head of cab- 
bage. The Nazis themselves enjoyed 
the humor of the incidents, although they 
forbade him to laugh. The prohibition, 
however, was unsuccessful. Then, due 
to the fact that he had a radio of suffi- 
cient strength to reproduce the offerings 
of Moscow and Prague, two anti-Nazi 
centers, he had to relinquish it for one 
less powerful. Once an amusing inci- 
dent occurred regarding this radio. He 
had dialed a Dutch station where they 
obliged by playing the "International" 
— anathema to Nazis. Some passing 
brown-shirts, upon hearing the strains of 
this tune, immediately entered his house 
and accused him of listening to Moscow 
which would give just grounds for con- 
fiscation. It was with much pleasure that 
he convinced them otherwise. 

Probably the saddest part of his story 
dealt with his children. These were 
taunted and molested by their classmates 
as offspring of a despicable former So- 
cial Democrat. The teacher, who often 
came to class in a uniform plus revolver, 
showed his contempt for such progeny 
by ignoring them with the result that 
ihey lost their taste for learning. I was 
also informed that a law was recently 
passed requiring all school children to 
wear Nazi uniforms in class. No doubt, 
everyone is aware that classes cmmence 
and cease with a Nazi salute and a 
"Heil Hitler!" greeting. 

Yet this man paid high tribute to Nazi 
organization and enlightened me consid- 
erably regarding their system. In short, 
the lowliest Nazi is the Storm Trooper, 
or S. A. man. But even in this category 
there are distinctions, especially between 
tho^e who were members before the rev- 
olution and those who joined after that 
occurrence. Above the Storm Trooper 
are the Motorcycle Corps, the Flying 
Corps and the S. S. men, or Todeschla- 
gers which I translate as Death Dealers. 
The S. S. men exercise more privileges 
than the police and are most feared. 
They wear black uniforms and are of a 
required height. In this connection it 
might also be mentioned that this organi- 
zation has concentration camps not only 
:oi its enemies, but also for its own re- 
bellious members. According to my in- 
formant, one danger to their party is the 
grevt expense of membership. The mem- 
bers must provide their own uniforms, 
weapons, and ammunition for rifle prac- 
tice which is held every week. If they 
travel they must bear their own expense. 
Also, they must pay dues and assess- 
ments plus the usual state taxes. These 
costs taken from a weekly wage of about 
thirty-five Marks that is further reduced 
by a high cost of living obviously may 
have a detrimental effect on the party in 
the future. 

Although this man's story illustrates 
to some extent the position of the Socia- 
list in Germany today, it must be under- 
stood that he was not considered too 
dangerous, but just a man to be watched. 
The only charge against him was his 
former sympathies. However, through 
his kindness I have been able to copy a 
letter which he is to deliver to a person 
here, that contains a story more preg- 
nant than his own. A translation fol- 
lows: 

December, 1933. 
Dear Brother and Relatives! 

As Mr. A— will again sail for Amer- 
ica, it will be possible for me to send 
you a few lines. We are allowed to 
write to foreign countries, but all of 
these letters are opened, and should any 



statement derogatory to the administra- 
tion be found therein, the writer would 
immediately be sent to a concentration 
camp. 

First: Regarding our last Reichstag 
elections. 

Germany, at present, has an approxi- 
mate population of sixty-five million. 
However, if we total all the votes of the 
last election, Germany should have a 
population of seventy million. Appar- 
ently the dead also voted. 

Secondly: Regarding the Revolution. 

On March 9 (1933) at seven o'clock, 
we Socialists together with the Commu- 
nists were arrested and taken to the city 
hall. I was apprehended by six Nazis, 
two with revolvers, three with black- 
jacks and one with a carbine. Six to one 
—certainly a nice combination. All kinds 
of scum, who hadn't bent a finger year 
in and year out, could be found among 
them. We were imprisoned six men to 
a cell. On March 10, we were released. 

The next day, while I was in the mar- 
ket-place on business, I was again ar- 
rested. As I had ordered something for 
my wife at the apothecary's, I asked 
leave to get it. For an answer I received 
a terrific blow with a black-jack. This, 
right on the street. Then I was taken 

to D (a neighboring town). On 

the way another Nazi joined us, one who 
was always drunk. He called to the 
others: Why havent you killed that 
swine yet? Kick him in the stomach so 
that his intestines hang - - - . Immedi- 
ately thereupon he struck me on the left 
hand with a piece of iron. Later, Roent- 
gen plates revealed the bones of one of 
my fingers to be broken. The fellow, 
however, wasn't satisfied and gave me 
a blow on the side of the head that 
knocked me senseless into a ditch. Then 
the others beat me back into conscious- 
ness. Finally, as we came to the first 
houses of D— — , one of my escorts 
sought to ram my head against a pole. 

At the city hall in D I was asked a 

few questions and then returned and 
imprisoned. After twelve days I was re- 
leased without questioning. 

On the Saturday before Palm Sunday, 
at seven o'clock, I was seized by two 
men and again taken to the city hall. 
Arriving there, I saw that they had tak- 
en the entire S. P. D. (German Socialist 
Party) into custody. One by one we 
were conducted to the reception room. 
My turn came at one-thirty. The entire 
room was filled with Nazis— about sev- 
enty men in all. I was compelled to sit 
in a chair. In back of me sat a Nazi, 
the son of P— — , with an S. S. man at 
his side. At each question 1 was struck 
on the shoulders so that I could scarce 
reply for pain. After this we were taken 
to cells, five men to a cell. At one o'clock 
on Palm Sunday I was handed over to 
the authorities of the L— — prison. Here 
I remained for seventeen days without 
questioning. During my confinement my 
house was searched four times. Now it 
seems as if this will never stop. 

My journeyman's license has been re- 
voked for ten weeks on the ground that 
I am suspected of treason. Apparently 
their wish is that I should starve. This 
applies to all trades, as only Nazis are 
hired. M— — has already been out of 
work for three years. They have de- 
prived him of the dole and say that he 
should join a work-camp. Much is bet- 
ing written now that unemployment has 
almost vanished. But what has hap- 
pened to the unemployed? At present 
only Nazis lacking work are counted as 
such. All others have been placed in 
work-camps, jails and prisons. Whoever 
refuses to join a work-camp is refused 
the dole and is not counted among the 
unemployed. In our neighborhood there 
arc six such camps. In every camp there 
are about one hundred men. These re- 
ceive M. — 30 per day (roughly, nine 
cents). Their work is building aque- 
ducts, making streets and draining 
swamps. They also work in quarries 
and sand deposits. . . . 

In the German prisons, jails, and con- 
centration camps there are about one 
hundred thousand men from the S. P. D. 



SPORT SHOTs 

"Hooks" Mylin's recent announcement 
that he has accepted a three-year con- 
tract to serve as head coach of footbal] 
at Bucknell University comes as a due 
reward to one who has put a small col- 
lege like ours on the map as far as foot- 
ball is concerned. Undoubtedly "Hooks" 
produced marvelous results from limited 
material here at Lebanon Valley, and if 
he is capable of forming similar squads 
c-iit o! a greater wealth of material at 
Bucknell that university will also praise 
the name of Mylin. "Hooks" bears with 
him the best wishes for success from 
every student and friend of Lebanon 
Valley College. He takes with him the 
honor of never having lost a football 
encoir.rer on our home field in Leba- 



Thc wrestlers are still working hard 
to form a capable squad despite the fact 
that they have not been successful in any 
meet so far this year. In their recent 
e;r£.prle with the Carlisle Y. M. C. A. 
misfortune played an important role in 
decisive setback. Houtz was out of ac- 
tion because of a broken bone in his 
foot, while Straub received an injured rib 
in his match which he apparently might 
Iuve won, and Coach Thompson was 
anable to wrestle. However, the boys 
Lughr valiantly against powerful oppo- 
sition, and at least gained more experi- 
ence at the sport, if nothing else. 

The boys emerged victorious last Sat- 
urday night, this time winning by the 
5 cant one-point margin. It seems as 
though close encounters are typical of 
this season's game, and Lebanon Valley 
has had its share of them, be they thrill- 
ers or heart-breakers. It seems as though 
the support of the students which was so 
prevalent earlier in the season is wan- 
ing. What say we stick with the team 
through defeat as well as victory. Re- 
member, we still want revenge in the 
ne.ct Albright game, so let's stir up the 
ole pep and let the team know what sort 
of backers they have. 



and the K. P. D. (the German Socialist 
and Communist parties). Today when 
one reads a paper he finds nothing but 
death sentences. If they ire all carried 
out at least one hundred heads will fall 
in the next few days. 

If you want to show these lines to 
anybody, please withhold my name. 
Someone may be false and report me. 
Then jrears would j»ass before I would 
ever leturn. 



Sincerely, 



Blank. 



That is the story of one Socialist. It 
is permeated with pessimism, but one 
can well imagine the revenge that he 
wouM seek should opportunity offer. The 
man who made it possible for me to copy 
this letter stated that, should the coun- 
ter-revolution begin tomorrow, he would 
"ail on the first boat. The problem of a 
counter-revolution is interesting. How- 
ever, as I have chosen to eschew the dis- 
cussion of other implications of th e 
Nazis, because abler publicists than my 
self have dealt with them, you may draw 
your own inferences. 

Very truly yours, 

Walter O. Krumbiegel. 



KALOS CELEBRATE 



Friday evening, February 23, a 
number of Kalo men and their part- 
ners danced to a three-piece orches- 
tra composed of George Shadcl, pi' 
anist; Frank Bryan, trombonist, and 
Tom Edwards "sax-ist." Prof. GinfJ' 
rich was around to see that there 
would be fun. Though things were 
done in a small way all around, the 
night as a whole was a success. 
About twenty couples were present 
—and all of the type who make their 
own laughs. In short, the evening 
passed and another good time "WM 
had by all." 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 1, 1934 



PAGE THREE 



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ould 
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IraW 



HEALTH IN ITS RELATION 
TO SOCIETY 



This theme, the work of Louise Hoff- 
man, is one of the required contributions 
■fi the Freshman hygiene course. 



a 
irt- 
eS' 
pi- 
nd 

:hc 
ss. 
;nt 
eir 

ng 



Jane, the president, rapped on the 
table for order. The first meeting of 
the newly-organized service club was 
about to begin. Everyone expected to 
|, e completely bored. Although they 
didn't openly protest, every girl was just 
raging- They formed this club to do 
good in the community and to help im- 
prove health conditions. Then their silly 
adviser conceived the idea that they have 
a discussion concerning health and the 
health in the community before they at- 
tempt to improve it. Just as though they 
didn't know anything about social health 
conditions. 

"I think," said Jane, "that the best 
wa y to begin a discussion on health is 
to learn the definition of it. Let us hear 
your definition, Marie." 

"Well," said Marie, "the dictionary 
says "Health is a condition of physical 
soundness, or a condition in which the 
organism discharges its functions effi- 
ciently.' " 

"I don't think that explains health 
very well," objected Helen. "You might 
be physically sound and yet not healthy. 
If you are unhappy and never do any- 
thing to help others, I don't think you 
are healthy." 

"I can prove that that definition is 
correct," replied Marie. "The word 
'health' is derived from the old English 
word 'hoelth' which means the condition 
of being safe and sound." 

Nevertheless, that isn't the real mean- 
ing. Too many people today think that 
health is merely freedom from disease. 
I read an article which stated that health 
is the condition of the body that makes 
possible the highest enjoyment of life, 
the greatest constructive work, and that 
shows itself in the best service to the 
world. One should keep the mind and 
body at the highest levels and live at 
one's best. This idea of health refuses 
to consider the individual as healthy 
who employs a wonderful physical body 
for purely selfish and socially undesir- 
able ends." 

"Helen, your idea of health is excel- 
lent," commended Miss Williams, the 
adviser. "That little speech acts very 
well as a forerunner to the definition of 
health which I have. In his book, "Per- 
sonal Hygiene Applied,' Dr. Williams 
says, 'Health is the quality of life that 
renders the individual fit to live most 
and serve best.' " 

'I think that describes health perfect- 
l y," said Jane, "for after all the test of 
body and mind is the test, not of weight- 
lifting nor of mental gymnastics, but of 
meeting the crises of life in such a way 
that a distinct advance has been made 
p 'ther for the individual or for society 
°r both." 

You are right," Mary, who had lis- 
tened very intently to the whole discus- 
sion, agreed, "for health as a freedom 
ftom disease is a standard of mediocrity, 
lv «>le health as a quality of life is a 
sc ano.ard of inspiration and increasing 
achievement. I consider health as a 
Quality of life more or less as a chal- 
en ge, and we, as an organization, should 
lnt erpret health in terms of service." 
I read an amusing article the other 
a V- interrupted Sarah. "It stated that 
-' Ve tyrhing from a man's ability to di- 
S e st raw onions up to his ability to ac- 
Ce P r disagreeable facts and get along 
disagreeable people depends largely 



°n th 



p precise kind of health he has. I 
1 Ink that is quite true." 
re i. * 3e ^ ieve some of us are beginning to 
he wnat we didn't know about 

a < laughed the president. "Now 
We clearly understand what the term 
£ means, let us discuss the causes^ 

A "k«alth and who is unhealthy." 

ar 'e, who was still a little sullen be- 
cause 'ip i r 

"A- den nition was objected to, said, 
b e I.'- C ° rding to that definition, I don't 



iev e 



anyone is healthy." 



"Oh, my," exclaimed Betty, "that is- 
n't true. There are many people who 
really are healthy. I have a list of the 
characteristics of a healthy perion. 
About nine-tenths of the healthy men 
and women in America meet most of 
these requirements. Shall I read the 
list 9 " 

"Go ahead," nodded Jane. 
"At least nine-tenths of the healthy 
people of America: 

1. Are strikingly unconscious of their 
boc'ies which run on well without spe- 
cial attention. 

2. Are free from disturbing varieties 
of seif-consciousness. 

3. Are easily absorbed in outside in- 
terests. 

4 Manifest a general joy in living. 

5. Carrv a burden of heavv work and 
responsibilities without complaint and 
with relatively little fatigue. 

6. Seldom crave narcotics unless by 
some abnormal factor, such as monoto- 
nous or excessive labor. A healthy man 
can have a habit of smoking but he does 
not crave for a cigarette. 

7. Rarely crave any of the "psyichic 
escapes" such as dream life, organized 
self-deception, cheap fiction, and reli- 
gions consolation. When they do, it is 
b'-cauFC of some abnormality of their 
environment " 

"That corresponds exactly to a list 
characterizing an unhealthy person 
which I read," exclaimed Jean. "I don't 
remember all the points, but I do re- 
member one which will make all or us 
think we are unhealthy. Just listen to 
it! An unhealthy person always wishes 
for Sundays and holidays." 

"I read that article too," Sarah called 
out. 'This is the quality which impressed 
mi the most. An unhealthy person usu- 
ally turns to cheap fiction or the mov- 
ies after a day's work." 

"Why, this discussion is becoming in- 
teresting, ' Marie acknowledged. "It is 
educational too. I'll have to brace up 
myself, if 1 want to help other people 
to re healthy." 

"That's the right spirit!" praised Miss 
Williams. "Do you know, Marie, that 
the most intelligent people are the heal- 
thiest?" 

"I didn't know it, but I can imagine 
thev arc I guess they spend the most 
money for health too. I believe money 
and education are the most important 
factors toward good health." 

"You are right again. It is the poor 
people and the illiterate people who 
lower the health rate in our country." 

"I have some statistics to confirm your 
statemenv, Miss Williams," Helen told 
her. "The uninsured are the least heal- 
thy and the least careful of health. The 
dull and unhealthy of America live in 
the subtropics, in regions infested with 
malaria, hookworms and smallpox. The 
negro's average life is 45 years. Ninety- 
five percent of the nine million negroes 
that live below the Mason and Dixon 
line are diseased or susceptible to ill- 
ness. They are illiterate and ignorant 
and thus spread disease. Native and for- 
eign born whites also tend to lower our 
health records. If only the high-grade 
Simon-Pure Americans were considered, 
the health records in America would be 
higher than in any other country in the 
world." 

"I want you girls to remember," ex- 
plained the adviser, "that ill-health and 
disease are caused, not only by physical 
factors, but also by social and mental 
factors. If one's resistance is low one 
can easily catch a cold from someone 
who is spreading cold germs. So always 
be as careful as possible if you have a 
cold or an infectious disease. If you 
have a cold go to the doctor and do as 
he tells you. I once knew a girl who had 
all the symptoms of scarlet fever. All 
the neighbors thought she had scarlet 
fever. However, the girl's mother did 
not take her to a doctor. In that way 
many germs were carried. She and her 
sisters and brothers went to school when 
they should have been at home under 
quarantine. That is one way in which 



health harms society. Parents should be 
concerned, not only with the heredity 
they convey to their children, but also 
with the social and physical environment 
they prepare for them. From the stand- 
point of society, parents are social trus- 
tees rather then individuals deriving lei- 
sure and satisfaction from their own cre- 
ation. It has been said, 'ignorant mother 
love has probably slain as many babies 
as disease.' " 

"I don't think health should do all 
the work," added Jane. "I think society 
owes health a great deal. Society should 
provide the best environment possible. 
Factors that legislation could and should 
govern are: housing, labor, recreation, 
food and water supply. A logical pro- 
cedure for the legislature would be to: 

Abolish all unsafe tenements, obtain 
opportunity for leisure and recreation, 
prescribe hours of labor, and protect 
food and water supplies." 

"That is very well," said Jane. "I 
agree," echoed the adviser. "You know, 
now society depends on the public school 
to train future generations in social 
standards and personal hygiene. I read 
that iliteracy has been lessened and 
school attendance increased since hy- 
giene is practised in the schools. I think 
we have had a most interesting discus- 
sion tonight, don't you?" 

Every girl present answered yes. 

"We really didn't allow a long enough 
time for the discussion. Health is such 
a big and important subject. We ought 
to continue our discussion the next 
time," Marie surprised everyone with 
this remark. 

"I am sorry, Marie, but we have to 
start with our social service health work 
at our next meeting," reminded Miss 
Williams. "Does anyone have a ques- 
tion?" 

"I have a question. What does all the 
foolish talk mean that health is a factor 
in the business depression? My father 
says anyone will buy if he has the mon- 
ey." Anne's father was a business man. 

"Money is only half the problem of 
the customer. The other half is health. 
The business man must improve the 
health of his customers if he would in- 
crease his profits. My father says that 
#297,000 a year is lost to producers and 
manufacturers, all because of common 
colds. People do not have the ambition 
to shop when they have a cold and if 
they are sensible they do not indulge in 
sweets and sundaes." Helen's father was 
a doctor. 

"I am sorry, Anne, but Helen is abso- 
lutely right. Here are three qualities 
Americans are noted for: 

The healthiest people in the world, 
the highest incomes in the world, and 
the best consumers in the world." 

"If there aren't any more questions," 
the president said, "I would like to sub- 
mit a motto which I think suits our club 
splendidly. 'Substitute health and hap- 
piness for wealth as a world ideal, and 
translate the new ideal into action from 
babyhood up.' " 



GIRLS DIVIDE PAIR OF CONTESTS; 

BE A T PENN HA LL, BO W TO JUNIA TA 



Miss Elser Soloist 

In Chapel Concert 

The Conservatory students con- 
ducted the Friday morning chapel per- 
iod Feb. 23, 1934. Prof. Carmean 
took charge of the program, which 
consisted of special violin numbers, 
played by Miss Martha Elser. Miss 
Elser, one of Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege's fore-most violinists, played two 
solos. The first of these was Ro- 
mance in |F by Beethoven. The 
Humming Bird was the second and 
last of Miss Elser's renditions. Both 
of the numbers were played extreme- 
ly well and with excellent expression 
and feeling. Miss Ruth Bailey ac- 
companied Miss Elser in the playing 
of both compositions. Miss Sarah 
Light played the postlude on the 
organ. 



The girls' basketball team lost a close 
battle to Juniata Friday, February 23, in 
the Annville High School gymnasium. 
They were defeated 34-33 in the last 
few seconds of play. 

The Lebanon Valley girls were de- 
cidedly outplayed in the first quarter^ 
at the end of which the score was 18-4— 
in favor of the visiting team. The sec- 
ond quarter found better work on the 
L. V. team so that the score at the half 
was 27-14; still in favor of the Juniata 
team. During the fourth quarter of the 
game, the L. V. team was once in the 
lead with the score 32-31. 

The game was a very exciting one. 
The L. V. team played an excellent 
game in the last three quarters. 

Lineup : 

Lebanon Valley Juniata 

A. Krebs R. F M. Pryce 

M. Smith L. F S. Trude 

A. Orth C U. Ranck 

M. Chamberlain..S. C C. Fleck 

C. Weirick R. G M. Greenwood 

H. March .L. G B. Wilson 

Referee— Miss Maher. 



The girls' basketball team defeated 
Penn Hall Saturday afternoon, February 
24. This was a long awaited game. It 
was a close battle, holding the interest 
of the audience until the last minute of 
play. 

Lebanon Valley gained 15 points in 
the first half, and 17 in the second half. 
While Penn Hall gained 12 points in 
the first half, and 18 in the second half. 

Gem Gemmill played for a short time 
in this game for the first time since her 
finger was broken. She replaced Mar- 
jorie Smith as left forward. 

Lineup : 

Lebanon Valley Penn Hall 

A. Krebs R. F Batten 

M. Smith L. F Critchfield 

A. Orth C Plumb 

M. Chamberlain.. S. C Kruse 

C. Weirick R. G Bourgiore 

H. March L. G Love 

Referee— Miss Maher. 



. .. w*\ 




THE WHOLE WEEK'S 
BRIGHTER 

1/ You Telephone Vkome! 

W^hen the skies fall (as they fall on all of 
us) ... when college life palls (as it will at 
times) . . . "talk it out" with the Home Folks 
by telephone. To hear their voice is next best 
to seeing them. 

How quickly you'll snap back to normal! 
A telephone "voice visit" can brighten your 
whole week. That's why so many college stu- 
dents telephone Home as a regular practice,, 
once a week at least. 



FOR LOWEST COST 
and €i II E ATKST EASE . . . 

Use the inexpensive Station to Station serv- 
ive when you telephone Home. (By mak- 
ing a "date" the Family is sure to be there.) 

Call after 8:30 P.M., when the low Night 
Rates are in effect. 

Just give the Operator your home telephone 
number and "hold the line." 

Charges may be reversed. 
tiii: i5i-:i.i. ii i.i i'iiom: COMPANY of i'iwsvi.vama 

VI — 6 




r 

I 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 1, 1934 



Campus Cuts 



Who wants lo write "Campus Cuts?' 
Its only advantage is that you can al- 
ways get back at your best pals— or 
your worst enemies. Wouldn't it be far 
more beneficial to retire, instead of 
ing one feeble brain for just another 
column? 



Had you heard about that rank injus- 
tice which was done to Allan Ranck in 
"Antigone"? The one play presented in 
years in which the parts were read, and 
then Allan had the good fortune to be a 
blind prophet with no possible chance of 
reading his lines. That's what we call a 
martyr to the cause of drama. Do I 
hear a second to that motion? 



L. V. Wrestlers Lose 
To Carlisle Y.M.C.A, 



Melvin Hitz certainly ranks loyalty to 
one's home town as an essential factor 
in the successful life of the L. V. stu- 
dent. When asked in economics class 
as to where he would go to play rou- 
lette and backgammon, to see beautifully 
gowned women, to drink expensive 
wines, and to dance to rhythmic orches- 
tras, he immediately responded, "Har- 
risburg." We wonder if he might be 
confused with dominoes, checkers, re- 
vival services, barn dances, and jug 
bands. 



Now for one of those subtle para- 
graphs that few students can under- 
stand, but several do feel the effects. On 
overhearing a conversation of two senior 
girls could you possibly on three guesses 
-—or less— ascribe this cocksure state- 
ment to any of your acquaintances, "I 
guess if I'm not May queen, you'll be?" 
Three guesses! Yes— you have it. We 
hope she isn't disappointed. Have you 
seen any senior girls walking around 
without those winsome smiles specially 
delivered for effective May Day cam- 
paigning? 



Sylvia Evelev startled the puritan at- 
mosphere of the day student rooms by 
heading this group as a devoted nudist 
advocate. She claims there is no sex in- 
volved in these colonies, only high and 
beneficial motives spur on the eager en- 
thusiasts. Sylvia is planning to organize 
a school of her own— just to show us 
that such ideal conditions do exist. More 
power to you, Miss Evelev, but let me 
warn you to wait until more balmy wea- 
ther will lessen your pupils' opportunity 
for catching a slight, annoying cold. All 
those desirous of joining this group, 
kindly sign up within the next few weeks 
to avoid the spring rush. 



Imagine: 

Spring is just around the corner. 
Brrr! and grrr! Are you airing your 
muslin undies? 

Emma Reinbold breaking through the 
ice into five and a half feet of icy wa- 
ter, when she originally intended to 
skate. 



DEBATING TEAMS DIVIDE 
WITH ELIZABETHTOWN 



(Continued from Page One) 



However, the local team, composed of 
Harold Hollingsworth, Mark Hostetter, 
and Robert Etter, gave a creditable ac- 
count of themselves in this first debate, 
and even greater things are expected of 
them in future forensic activities. 

The team debating at home was com- 
posed of William Earnest, Robert 
Womer, and Calvin Reber, with Jack 
Morris as alternate. Well balanced in 
every respect, this group had little diffi- 
culty in gaining the approval of the 
judges and audience. 

Judges of the local debate were: Ma- 
jor H. D. Case, a broker of Lebanon; 
Rev. U. E. Apple, pastor of Lutheran 
church, Annville; and Mr. Isaac Knoll, 
professor in Narberth- Junior High 
School, Narberth. The chairman of the 
debate was Professor C. R. Gingrich. 



Handicapped by injuries inflicted be- 
fore and during the match, the wrestlers 
were decidedly beaten last Saturday 
night by the Carlisle Y. M. C. A. at 
Carlisle, 30 to 5. Houtz, representative 
in the unlimited class for the "Col- 
legians", broke a bone in his foot in the 
recent basketball game with the F. & M. 
Frosh, and was therefore unable to see 
action. In the 165-lb. class, Straub, who 
apparently was winning his match, was 
forced to withdraw because of a cracked 
rib. Coach Thompson was also unable 
to be present at this meet. 

"Ike" Buzzell put up a good scrap in 
his match, which was an exhibition be- 
cause the Carlisle wrestler was too 
heavy, and forced his opponent almost 
to the time limit before conceding. The 
heavyweight encounter was forfeited to 
the Y. M. C. A. opponents because the 
locals had no representative in that class. 

126 lbs.— Beaver, Collegians, lost to 
Nicholson, Carlisle, on a fall in 1 min- 
ute, 42 seconds. 

135 lbs.— Fridy, Collegians, lost to 
Shearer, Carlisle, on a fall in 4 minutes, 
1 1 seconds. 

145 lbs.— Hershey, Collegians, lost to 
E. Zeigler on a fall in 4 minutes, 56 
seconds. 

155 lbs.— Jenkins, Collegians, lost to 
R. Morrison on a fall in 2 minutes, 47 
seconds. 

165 lbs.— Straub, Collegians, lost to S. 
Zeigler on a fall in 6 minutes, 42 sec- 
onds. 

175 lbs.— Masimer, Collegians, lost to 
G. Zeigler on a fall in 3 minutes, 29 
seconds. 

Exhibition— Buzzell, Collegians, lost 
to Goodyear, Carlisle, on a fall in 9 
minutes, 24 seconds. 



STANDING OF LEAGUE 



W. L. Pet. 

Gettysburg [ 8 1 .889 

Franklin 6 Marshall.. 6 3 .667 

Muhlenberg 5 4 .556 

Lebanon Valley 5 4 .556 

Albright 4 4 .500 

Drexel j 2 8 .200 

Ursinus 1 7 .125 



FLYING DUTCHMEN NOSE 
OUT DREXEL IN THRILLER 



(Continued from Page One) 



shots which brought the crowd into an 
uproar. 

In the extra period a field goal by 
Kline and a foul by Shuipis sent Drexel 
ahead, 40-37, but the lead was short 
lived as Smith and Rust counted goals 
to send the Blue and White ahead, 45- 
40, with less than a minute to play. 

Reynolds scored a side shot and then 
counted under the basket for Drexel and 
the game ended a moment later with 
both teams battling for possession of the 
ball. 

Lineups : 

Lebanon Valley 



HOOKS MYLIN GOES TO 
BUCKNELL AS COACH 

(Continued from Page One) 



turning out several splendid teams as 
well as developing many fine athletes. 

He is a man of high principles, a man 
capable of maintaining the high stand- 
ards both athletically and spiritually that 
were set up by Carl Snavely, now 
coaching at North Carolina. 

As an undergraduate at Franklin and 
Marshall he was a brilliant quarterback 
and as a coach at Lebanon Valley he 
has been able to impart his knowledge to 
his pupils. 

One of Mylin's outstanding pu- 
pils was Charley Gelbert, ill-fated 
shortstop of the St. Louis Cardi- 
nals, whose baseball career was 
ruined by an accidental shot while 
hunting. Gelbert was not only a 
baseball star but a football great 
and basketball brilliant as well. 

In accepting the position at Bucknell, 
Mylin is putting himself on the spot. 
Scholarships have been discontinued at 
the Lewisburg institution we understand 
and without adequate material Mylin 
vv. : if have to be a magician to develop 
teams that can compete with the calibre 
of c'ovens now on the Bison schedule. 

Snavely left him a heritage of splen- 
did material that will carr yhim through 
1934 but what of 1935-36 and so on! 

We wish him lots of luck. It looks 
as if lie will need it. 



G. 


F. 


Pts. 


4 


1 


9 





3 


3 


6 


2 


14 


2 





4 


2 





4 





2 


2 


2 


5 


9 











16 


13 


45 



Drexel 

G. F. Pts. 

Knapp, f 5 10 

Raynes, f 2 1 5 

Kline, f 2 4 

Edwards, f 1 1 3 

Hoff, c 1 1 3 

Reynolds, g 3 5 11 

Shuipis, g 13 5 

Wallace, g 1 1 3 

Totals 16 12 44 

Drexel : 22 15 7-44 

Lebanon Valley 12 25 8-45 

Referee— Boyer, Lancaster. 




DINE and DANCE 

AT THE 

GREEN TERRACE 

ONE MILE EAST OF ANNVILLE 




WE INVITE 
L. V. C. 
STUDENTS 
TO TRY OUR 
DELICIOUS 
FOODS. 



c! 



DoutriehS 



Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 



"Moreover, the bestowal of unnation- 
al rights upon women has imposed upon 
them unnatural duties, and, neverthe- 
less, a breach of these duties makes them 
unhappy." — Schopenhauer. 



"A man cannot turn anything over in 
his mind unless he knows it; he should 
therefore learn something." — Schopen- 
hauer. 



"Women have, in general, no love for 
any art; they have no proper knowledge 
of any; they have no genius." — Rous- 



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"Conserv Drag 
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99 



IaU ie Colkgiennt 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Mothers' Week-end 
Coming 



VOL. X 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 1934 



No. 24 



p. P. Selsam Defends 
France In Chapel 
Address Last Week 

FRENCH DESIRE SECURITY 



Former League Attache Inter- 
ests Students by Describing 
International Affairs 



Mr. Frederick P. Selsam, in a speech 
before an enthusiastic chapel audience 
on Thursday morning, declared that the 
present policy of the French people must 
be considered as the legitimate outcome 
of the treatment France received at the 
hands of the other powers when form- 
ulating the pe^ice treaties at the end of 
the World War. 

Mr. Selsam, who was an attache a! 
the various peace conferences, is weJ 
qualified to speak concerning the poli- 
cies of the various foreign countries. 
While acting as interpreter, he learned 
to know many of the prominent men in 
attendance and also became intimately 
acquainted with the various documents. 
With such a background, Mr. Selsam 
was in a position to speak authorita- 
tively. 

RHINE BOUNDARY PROBLEM 
France, which was the topic of his ad- 
dress, was forced into her present policy 
by the policies of Great Britain and the 
United States, the speaker maintained. 
When the delegates of the various coun- 
tries met in order to formulate peace 
treaties after the World War, France 
made many demands on the conquered 
Germans on the grounds that she must 
have protection. Claiming that the 
Rhine, as the Germans themselves had 
admitted, was the natural boundary be- 
tween the two countries, France asked 
for the territory up to the Rhine river. 
Since the Germans were absolutely and 
unalterably opposed to this, the peace- 
makers found themselves at a standstill. 

Then Great Britain and the United 
States proposed to France that they form 
a Protective alliance, making any attack 
°n France an absolute absurdity. Witn 
this promise, France was perfectly will- 
tog, to relinquish her claims and peace 
agreements moved forward accordingly. 
Gre at Britain ratified the treaty but 
* he n it came before the United States 
ingress it was defeated and thus be- 
Came nuu and void due to a clause con- 
continued on Page 3, Column 4) 



Delphian-Kalo 

Play /Hay fever/ 
Being Prepared 



he Delphian-Kalo anniversary play, 
ayfever, is gaining headway with 
■ V tw ° more weeks of rehearsals. The 
/V was written by Noel Coward who 
e author of several other well-known 
,.^ ys ; "Cavalcade," "Bitter-S wee t," 
esi 9n for Living," and others. 
Th 

k» cast is a well-experienced one. 

^dUh G ° SSard takcs thc P art of Mrs - 
stag B ' 1SS wno nas retired from the 
il y ° be with her husband and fam- 
Cath Buzzell is Mr. Bliss, and 

are fa Z Wa gner and George Shirk 
the c C s chi ldren. The remainder of 
Th ey aSt are visitors at the Bliss home. 

Jackie T Myra Arundel > Ida Hall: 
P U rl 0n Ju " e Gingrich; Sandy, Charles 
the njjl «Jchard ( Charles Hauck, and 
con, ed ' , C,aJ re Adams, The play is a 

of e vem s Ut th ° humor rests in the turn 
Str i rat " er than the conversation. 
le is coaching the play. 



PROGRAM FOR MOTHERS' 
WEEK-END 



March 10— Saturday 

12:15 — Dinner in the College din- 
ing hall. 

1:30 — Girls' basketball game 

Lebanon Valley vs. Al- 
bright in Annville high 
school. 

3:00 — Welcome by Dr. Lynch. 

Concert featuring the girls' 
band in Engle Hall. 

5:00— Lunch in the college dining 
hall. 

7:00— Social in North Hall parlor. 

7:00 — Men's basketball game 

Lebanon vs. Albright in 
Lebanon high school. 

March 1 1 — Sunday 

9:15 — Sunday School. 
10 :30 — Worship Service. 
12: 15— Dinner in the college din- 
ing hall. 

2:00-Tea in North Hall parlor. 



Mothers To Visit 
L. V. This Week-end 



FULL PROGRAM PLANNED 



Athletic, Social, Religious, And 
Musical Events Scheduled 
For Two Davs 



The first Mothers' Week-end will be 
observed on the campus this Saturday 
and Sunday, March 10 and 11. The pro- 
gram will open with dinner in the col- 
lege dining hall Saturday at noon. At 
1:30 there will be a girls' basketball 
game in the Annville high school gym- 
nasium. The L. V. Blue Belles will play 
Albright. 

At 3:00 the newly organized girls' 
band will give its first concert in Engie 
hall. Se\ 7 eral solo numbers will be fea- 
tured on the program. At this time Dr. 
Lynch will welcome the visitors. Satur- 
day evening will be devoted to a quiet 
social in North Hall parlor. Sunday 
morning the mothers and students are in- 
vited to attend Sunday school and wor- 
ship service in the college church. The 
students will have some special part in 
the worship service. 

The final event will be a tea Sunday 
afternoon from two to four in North Hail 
parlor. 

The dormitory students will entertain 
their mothers overnight in their own 
halls. Those students whose mothers are 
unable to attend have invited friends in 
Annville to be their guests. The da/ 
students are planning to bring their 
mothers to as many of the activities as 
they can. The women professors and 
faculty wives are invited to be special 
guests and to be present at all the events. 



THREE APPEAR ON 
SHOW PROGRAM 



On Sunday, March 1 1 , three campus 
artists will appear on the program of 
the Community Service held in the Her- 
shey theatre. These popular services, 
presented weekly, give a splendid type 
of program and Lebanon Valley College 
will be ably represented by these musi- 
cians. 

Matilda Bonanni will sing, and Mar- 
tha Elser will give several violin num- 
bers. Ruth Bailey will do the accom- 
panying. 



Double Victory In 
Debate Tilts With 
Western Maryland 

VOTE 2-1 AT BOTH PLACES 



Womer, Reber, Etter, Hostetter 
Shine In Oregon Type 
Debate 



The men's debating teams engaged in 
a dual combat on the evening of March 
1 , when they met the representatives o^ 
Western Maryland College, both at 
Westminster and at Annville. The Leb- 
anon Valley negative, debating at West- 
ern Maryland, received a 2-1 decision 
of the judges in their favor. Robert 
Womer and Calvin Reber ably repre- 
sented this team with carefully construct- 
ed speeches, answers and questions 
showing clear and definite knowledge of 
the N.R.A. problem. 

Dr. H. H. Shenk presided at the home 
contest held in Philo Hall, in which the 
Lebanon Valley affirmative team parti- 
cipated. The speakers for Western 
Maryland were William Kesmodel and 
Norman Sliker, while the L. V. repre- 
sentatives were Mark Hostetter and Rob- 
ert Etter. The home team also scored a 
victory with the same decision, a 2-1 
vote by the judges. 

This was the second in the series of 
Oregon plan debases, which movement 
debating enthus.asts now claim to be the 
only method for college participation. It 
is hoped in the near future to do away 
entirely with the old-fashioned three 
speaker method, and in its place install 
this far more interesting plan. Popular 
student opinion voices the failure of los- 
ing debates to be due to their "canned" 
summaries, which they evidently wrote 
without taking into consideration the 
possibility of clever answering, evading, 
and twisting of their problems. 

Judges for this debate were: Mr. 
James Stewart, production manager of 
Lebanon Steel Foundry; Rev. H. S. Eich- 
ner, minister of St. Paul's Lutheran 
church, Annville, and Prof. A. H. Kelch- 
ner, teacher of English, Palmyra. 



Conservatory Will 
Sponsor "Drag J In 
Gymnasium Friday 

FLOOR SHOW TO FEATURE 



Schuler's Conservatory Colle- 
gians To Play As La 
Bonanni Sings 

Tomorrow evening Friday, the Con- 
servatory will sponsor the formal re- 
opening of the newly-painted gym with 
a big "Conserv Drag." The celebration 
will be in the form of a dance with a 
floor show of interesting specialty num- 
bers. 

The music for the evening will be 
provided by Jack Schuler and the Con- 
servatory Collegians. :A hint of the 
quality of the floor show is given in the 
tip that a snappy piano team has con- 
sented to play severa' popular numbers. 
Tillie Bonanni will be there with a group 
of hits — she's promised that one of them 
will be "Everything I Have is Yours." 
There will also be several other vocal- 
ists and a special dance feature. The 
orchestra, too, has some fine offerings. 

(Continued on Page 4, Column 1 ) 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



Thursday, March 8— 

Frosh vs. Seniors in the college 
gym. Little Symphony at 3:30 P. M. 
Life Work Recruit meeting at 6:45. 
Friday, March 9— 

"Conserv Drag" in gym, 8 to 11:45 
o'clock. 

Saturday, March 10— 

Albright vs. Lebanon Valley at 
Lebanon. 

Sunday, March 11 — 

"Y. W." and "Y. M." meetings at 
5:45 P. M. 
Monday, March 12— 

College Orchestra practice at 3.30 
P. M. Band practice at 7:00 P. M. 
Tuesday, March 13— 

Sophs vs. Juniors in the college 
gym. Girls' band practice at 7:00 
P. M. 

Wednesday, March 14— 

Debate with Gettysburg in Philo 
Hall at 8:00. Band practice at 7:00 
P. M. 

Thursday, March 15— 

Debate with Westminster in Philo 
Hall at 8.00. 



Scholarships To Be 
Given After Exams 



AIDS NINE IN NUMBER 



Competitive Tests Held For 
Prospective Freshmen On 
May Day Morning 



Lebanon Valley College has inaugu- 
rated a new custom in offering competi- 
tive scholarships to high school seniors. 
All high school seniors who are in the 
upper one-third of the graduating class 
are eligible to apply for these scholar- 
ships. 

There are nine scholarships in the con- 
test. In the first group there are three 
full-tuition scholarships for boarding stu- 
dents. Two of these are for those stu- 
dents desiring to pursue college courses. 
The other is for a student entering the 
Conservatory of Music. 

The second group consists of three 
scholarships which offer one-half of the 
tuition for boarding students. Of these 
three, two are for college students and 
one for conservatory students. 

There is also a group of three scholar- 
ships for day students. These three of- 
fer $50.00 each. There are two for col- 
lege students and one for students who 
are considering entering the conservatory 
of music. 

On May 5, 1934, competitive exami- 
nations will be held on Lebanon Vallev 
College campus for all those who desire 
to compete for these rewards. All con- 
testants will be the guests of the college 
for the annual May Day pageant and 
the Lebanon Valley-Albright baseball 
game. Applications and additional in- 
formation may be obtained from the col- 
lege office or Dr. Clyde A. Lynch. 



HERSHEY PUPILS 
HEAR MUSICIANS 



A group of college musicians gave a 
well-produced program during the as- 
sembly period of the Hershey High 
School on Friday afternoon. 

Those appearing on the program were 
Matilda Bonanni, soprano; Martha El- 
ser, violinist; Dale Roth, tenor; Earl Lin- 
ger, cornetist. Ruth Bailey was accom- 
panist for all four soloists. 



Clios and Philos 
Join Friday Night 
In Joint Session 

"FACULTY" ENTERTAINS 



Novel Impersonations Presented 
— Ramblers Furnish Music 
For Evening's Dancing 

Clio and Philo Literary Societies held 
a clever joint session in Philo hall last 
Friday evening. Miss Rose Dieter and 
Henry Palatini as joint program chair- 
men had arranged a most amusing enter- 
tainment. 

The guests were given a glimpse into 
the Pennway restaurant at breakfast time 
where Kenneth Eastland and Ken Sheaf- 
fer were having coffee and buns. The 
conversation switched to the chapel ques- 
tion—should they or should they not go? 
Finally, however, the pair decided to at- 
tend. 

The next scene that greeted the guests 
was the same the fellows met in chapel 
and the same (with a few minor altera- 
tions) that daily meets faithful chapel 
goers. The faculty in all splendor was 
seated upon the platform. 

Almost immediately Louis Straub, 
who might have been mistaken for Dr. 
Lynch's shadow, arose and gave the sig- 
nal for quiet when he explained that 
members of the faculty would present a 
program that "morning " 

The German department was repre- 
sented by Dr. Lietzau who played a med- 
ley of familiar German airs. Miss Liet- 
zau will have to look over the Freshman 
class where she'll find her double in Lois 
Harbold. 

The French department next drew at- 
tention. Kotty McAdam and Matilda 
Bonanni as Mrs. Green and Mrs. Ste- 
venson sang quite skillfully a difficult 
round, "Frere Jacques." Mrs. Stevenson 
then as a solo presented "Harbenera" 
from Carmen, also in French. 

Guy Beaver gave a reading in the 
manner so familiar to students in Leba- 
non Valley. 

Miss Myers and Dr. Richie also sang. 
Their number was "There's an Old Spin- 
ning Wheel in the Parlor." This senti- 
ment probably led their minds back a 
few years for soon the guests heard all 
the adventures of the time "when you 
and I were young, Helen— and Adol- 
phus." Louise Gillan and George Hilt- 
ner put on this act. 

(Continued on Page 4, Column 1) 



Clio and Philo 
Casts Selected 
for Casella Play 



"Death Takes a Holiday" has been 
chosen by the Clionian and Philokos- 
mian Literary Societies as their joint 
anniversary play, which will be present- 
ed on May 4, the date of Philo's sixtv- 
seventh anniversary. The play commit- 
tees of both societies cooperated in 
searching out a desirable work, and final- 
ly decided upon this modern vehicle by 
Albert Casella. It was rewritten espe- 
cially for the American stage by Walter 
Ferris and was first produced in Ameri- 
ca in 1929. In its initial season it was 
immensely successful on Broadway and 
for the past several seasons has been 
one of the most popular of all plays. 
Just recently it has been released as a 
movie under the same title as the play. 

Primarily, "Death Takes a Holiday" 
is a tragedy, but it is not tragedy alone. 
For scattered throughout the play are 

(Continued on Page 3, Column 5) 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 1934 



la Vit Coilegtemte 

ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Edmund Umberger, '34 .. .Editor-in-Chief 
Kathryn Mowrey, '34. .. .Associate Editor 
Richard Schreiber, '34 . .Managing Editor 
Richard Baus, '37 Asst. Man. Editor 

REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Martha Kreider. '34 
Allan Ranck, '34 
Elizabeth Schaak, '34 
Helen Earnest, '35 
Sylvia Evelev, '36 

David Yake, '36 General Reporters 

Christine Gruber, '34 Conservatory 

DeWitt Essick, '34 

George Hiltner, '35 Athletics 

Catherine Wagner, '35 Alumni 

Clyde Mentzer, '34 Philokosmian 

Robert Cassel, '36 Kalozetean 

Jane Shellenberger, '36 Clionian 

Marietta Ossl, '36 Delphian 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Jack Todd, '34 Business Manager 

Kenneth Sheaffer, '35. Asst. Bus. Manager 
Allen Buzzell, '34. . .Circulation Manager 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 



Single Copies 5 cents 

Subscription $1-00 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter, under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 1934 
DO FATHERS RATE? 



The announcement that the Young 
Women's Christian Association will 
sponsor a Mothers' Week-End this next 
Saturday and Sunday has brought forth 
suggestions that a Fathers' Week-End 
be instituted by the corresponding men's 
organization. 

There is much merit in this proposal. 
Most fathers who have sons here at 
Lebanon Valley would appreciate an 
opportunity to be on the campus for a 
day or two, and to enjoy a program 
carefully planned with the aim of show- 
ing them L. V. C. at its best. An ath- 
letic contest, a play or recital, and other 
activities would afford busy men whole- 
some relaxation and an insight into col- 
lege life. 

Of course, many problems would face 
the sponsors of such a project. Most 
fathers of Lebanon Valley students are 
too occupied to find many times when 
a visit to the college would be feasible. 
Neither are accommodations for men as 
readily available as they are for the 
Mothers' Week-End. It also would be 
more difficult to devise entertainment for 
the visiting fathers. 

Here is a suggestion for the Y. M. C. 
A. Cabinet to be elected in the near fu- 
ture. The date need not be in the 
Spring, but might be placed in the next 
year. Think it over, and we may some- 
time have a Fathers' Week-End to take 
its place with the Homecoming Day, 
Mothers' Week-End, and Alumni Day 
already in existence. 



PERSONALS 



Since February 24 there has been an- 
other married man living at Lebanon 
Valley. For on that day Mr. Richard 
Slaybaugh, accompanied by Miss Ro- 
maine Bushey of Gettysburg, a former 
Shippensburg State Teachers College 
student. A U. B. minister, once a L. V. 
student, did the "tying." Dick's room- 
mates say that on the Monday following 
his marriage, he addressed the first let- 
ter to his wife with a "Miss." Now the 
first floor of the dormitory is the only 
to lack representation of such types. So 
it is proved again that while men are at 
college, upon becoming married it is hard 
to detect very many changes in their 
ordinary living. 



THE FORUM 



Editor of La Vie: 

I read the article about Germany in 
The Forum. I enjoyed it greatly except 
in the beginning where Mr. Krumbiegel 
makes a few remarks about Jews. I do 
not believe that they control the press 
as they do not control the capital of this 
country, although they have influential 
men in either group. These are the 
characteristic exaggerations of chauve- 
nists and anti-semites. 

All mass struggles are founded mainly 
on economic grounds. The working 
class organized in the left parties were 
fast gaining ground in Germany and in 
order to stem the victory of socialism 
the capitalists with a part of the middle 
class and professionals joined hands and 
brutally deprived the workers of their 
rights. As a bait to the wavering and 
reward to the followers the Jewish busi- 
ness, professional practices and workers' 
jobs were offered. In order to clear their 
consciences for the outside world a theo- 
ry of "Aryan" was created. 

One can not help recalling the epi- 
sodes of the Crusades. A hungry, tired 
mass is coming to the gates of the city. 
The city elders are afraid that they will 
ransack, rob and despoil everything. 
They decide to sacrifice the Jews. The 
mob is in and whole congregations are 
wiped off the face of the earth without 
regard for age, sex. 

To come back to the article in The 
Forum. Our newspapers do not talk so 
much about the atrocities committed on 
the Socialists or Communists because 
they hate them as much as the Nazis do. 
It is not because they are controlled by 
Jews. These newspapers first of all serve 
the capitalist class and naturally feel an 
enmity towards those elements whose 
aim it is to make an end to the capi- 
talist system. 

The atrocities of the Nazis, whether 
against the Socialists and Communists, 
or Jews, can not be considered sepa- 
rately. It is suppression of justice, liber- 
ty, the victory of brutal force over all 
that is sacred and won with so much 
sacrifice by our civilization. Every hon- 
est man should fight everywhere against 
brutish forces of the Nazis or Fascists. 

M. EVELEV. 
Lebanon, Pa. 



Cockshott Is Elected 
President ofY. W. C. A. 



The Y. W. C. A. held its annual elec- 
tion in North Hall parlor Wednesday 
afternoon, March 7. An association 
meeting was held previous to the elec- 
tion, at which the cabinet members of 
the past year read reports of the year's 
activities. 

The election was held at this early 
date so that plans can be made for Mav 
Day. The newly-elected president auto- 
matically becomes chairman of the May 
Day committee. 

Lena Cockshott was elected president 
of the association. She served as fresh- 
man commissioner the past year. She 
has been active in campus activities 
throughout her college career. Louise 
Gillan is the new vice-president. She 
served as president of the freshman "Y* 
cabinet last year. Following are the 
other officers: 

Recording secretary, Alma Cline; cor- 
responding secretary, Iva Claire Wei- 
rick; treasurer, Louise Shearer; pianist, 
Grace Naugle; day student representa- 
tive, Catherine Wagner; faculty advi- 
sers: Mrs. Green, Mrs. Wallace, Miss 
Myers. 



"The individual's life is of impor- 
tance to none beside himself." — Oswald 
Spengler in the "American Mercury." 



"When a woman no longer needs to 
exert any mystical fascination of limb or 
lips to capture a sugar-broker, she turns 
to lyric poetry or dyspepsia." — Logan 
Clendenning. 




BE YONDt^ CAMPUS 



Whether or not the federal govern- 
ment was right in cancelling air mail 
contracts and turning over air) mail de- 
livery to the army, it does seem that the 
actual carrying out of the plan has been 
too harshly judged. Subjected to ex- 
tremely adverse weather conditions and 
an entirely unfamiliar routine, army fliers 
have been the object of much criticism 
from some quarters because of several 
important mishaps. However, things may 
not be as bad as they seem. In a re- 
cent telegram to Postmaster General 
Farley, the noted airman, Clarence D. 
Chamberlin, declared that major com- 
mercial airlines are building up public 
belief that the administration made a 
grave mistake in turning over the air- 
mail to the army by propaganda that 
magnifies army mishaps and minimizes 
their own. He pledged his aid in efforts 
to "change the nation's air transporta- 
tion system from an organized octopus 
racket to a business" and drew attention 
to the fact that United Air Lines alone 
"has within the past few months had 
four fatal crashes, killing eleven pilots 
and hostesses and an equal number of 
passengers, plus about five more major 
crashes with no lives lost, all with the 
latest twin motored cabin ships and lat- 
est instruments." 

On Saturday, March 3, the Army flew 
the only plane that moved along the 
airways serving New York City for a 
period of twenty-four hours. This was 
a Curtiss Falcon, piloted by Lieutenant 
Howard Moore, which landed at New- 
ark airport after a flight from Boston. 
Maybe the Army Air Corps isn't a 
"bunch of dubs" after all. 

And what do you think of this? Re- 
cently the results of research conducted 
in Teachers College, Columbia Univer- 
sity, showed the brainiest babies, like 
the best love sonnets and hay fever, are 
born in the spring. These are tha sta- 
tistics: 

Spring (April- June) —I. Q., 102.35. 

Summer (July-September) — 102.05. 

Autumn (October-December) 101. S5. 

Winter ( January-March ) — 1 00.65. 

Frankly, those of us born in the au- 
tumn and winter don't believe there's i 
thing in it. True, Miss Frances Perkins 
was born in April. And Mussolini in 
July. And General Johnson in August— 
but February is the month of geniuses 
and boasts of Lindbergh as well as 
Washington and Lincoln. And Franklin 
D. Roosevelt was born in January. And 
we're certain that Helen Hayes has a 
high I. Q. and she was born in October. 
Well, here's hoping this won't start any- 
thing and — remember, if you were born 
at the wrong time you may by careful 
living overcome your handicap. 



Snow may be a great thing for Christ- 
mas, or to throw through dorm windows, 
or at professors, but to the city of New 
York it's just a pain in the neck, or 
rather, the pocketbook. Ernest P. Good- 
rich, commissioner of Sanitation of that 
city, is studying contracts to bus com- 
panies to see if they cannot be assessed 
for part of the cost of removing snow. 
He revealed that New York has spent 
$6,000,000 to remove snow this year. 
The snow of last week was a million 
dollar one. 

Representatives of interests using New 
York harbor have petitioned the federal 
government to establish an ice breaking 
fleet for the port. 



Those who advocate that women's 
place is in the home have their case con- 
siderably strengthened through the es- 
cape of the notorious "cop killer," John 
Dillinger, from the woman sheriff of 
Lake County, Illinois, Mrs. Lillian Hol- 
ley. Dillinger, wanted for nearly a score 
of bank robberies and murders, made 



Lake County's "escape proof" jail look 
foolish. Mrs. Holley received the news 
in a characteristic outburst of feminine 
rage and announced that "If I ever see 
John Dillinger again I'll shoot him dead 
with my own pistol." "This is too ridic- 
ulous," she exclaimed, "to talk about.' 
And she was right. 



Then there is Samuel Insull who is 
again making a vigorous attempt to 
break once more into the headlines. If 
seems that the Greeks have finally made 
him understand that he isn't wanted 
around the place. Maybe we shouldn't 
blame Sam. Everyone says that Greek 
is very difficult to acquire. 



And also the unsuspecting salesman 
who tried to sell Mrs. Ella A. Boole a 
case of beer. For particulars see March 
4 Herald Tribune, section 1, page 23. 



The following are examples of "Pic- 
turesque Speech" taken from highly 
literary periodicals and books: 

He looked like an accident going 
somewhere to happen. 

As hard to catch as a waiter's eye. 

His vest pocket was so filled wita 
cigars and pencils, he looked like a 
small pipe organ. 

Heard at a Junior College dance. 
"May I borrow your frame for this 
struggle?" 

Sign in a Boston library— "Low Con- 
versation Permitted." 



When Lindbergh flew to France— at 
just 25— every newspaper had to dwell 
upon his youth. He was a mere kic\ 
Yet he was as old as Keats at his death. 
He was a year older than Pitt was when 
he became Prime Minister of England. 
He was eight years older than Mendels- 
sohn was when he composed his over- 
ture to "A Midsummer Night's Dream." 
Jane Austen was writing one of her best 
novels at 21. Smollett was a physician, 
married and busy as a man of letters at 
24. Moseley, the British scientist, had 
contributed his work and given up his 
life in the battle of Gallipoli at 27. At 
30, Kipling had published a dozen vol- 
umes or more, including several of his 
best. 

"In other words, much of the signifi- 
cant record of the human race has been 
made by men and women scarcely older 
than the hundreds of thousands of stu- 
dents who mull along in crowd fashion, 
year after year, in our undergraduate 
colleges." 

Before Oliver Wendell Holmes was a 
writer, he practiced medicine, and taught 
anatomy at Harvard and Dartmouth. 
As a practitioner he was not successful, 
for people were a bit doubtful about the 
flippant youth who posted the following 
sign above his office door: 

"Small fevers gratefully received." 



Many bouquets (verbal) are handed 
to Roosevelt after one year's trial of his 
original idea. Whether it has been par- 
ticularly successful or not is difficult to 
prove, but it is at least admitted that it 
restored courage and confidence to the 
people. At any rate, Roosevelt must be 
given the credit of keeping to his con- 
victions and carrying out his plans not- 
withstanding all sorts of opposition. He 
is a man of personality and character. 



According to facts and statistics at 
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, the male is the 
weaker sex. The basis for judging was 
resistance to disease. In the 300,000 
cases studied, men were found to be 
more frequently victims of diseases of 
the digestive tract, lungs, kidneys, brain, 
and functional diseases than women. 
Some reasons for this, as told by Dr. 
Mayo, are alcoholism, tobacco, and ir- 
regular habits of sleeping and eating. 
This should upset some of our pet theo- 
ries, because it is added that mere physi- 
cal prowess in great feats of strength is 
but the outward habiliment of physical 
superiority and is unimportant in vital 
matters. 




Britannicus: "By the Olympian gods, 
woman, where in the divil is my cigarette 
lighter?" 

Agrippina: "Take it easy, big boy, 
take it easy. Little Nero is just out burn- 
ing Rome again." 



Gracious Hostess: "And how did you 
happen to go into the Army instead of 
the Navy, my dear Percival?" 

Griped Soldier: "Because I take cold 
so easily, my dear Mrs. Wafflesticker." 



Napoleon (after Waterloo) 
that's my Waterloo." 



Well, 



"Why is your car painted blue on one 
side and red on the other?" 

"Oh, it's a fine idea. You should hear 
the witnesses contradicting each other.". 



"Shay y'know that wooden Indian 
down in front of Jack's shigar-stor ?" 
"Yeh, sure I do." 
"Well, he dunno you." 



Always laugh at the prof's poor jokes, 
No matter what they be; 
Not because they are funny, boys, 
But it's darn good policy. 



A freshman for the Amazon 
Put nighties of his Gramazon; 

The reason's that 

He was too fat 
To get his own Pajamazon. 



Prof. Light: "What turns green in 
the Spring?" 

Sary: "Christmas jewelry." 



If all the boarders in the boarding 
houses were placed side by side at a 
table, they would still reach. 



"Help your wife," says the Good 
Housekeeping, "when she mops up the 
floor, mop up the floor with her." 



"I shall now illustrate what I have in 
my mind," said the professor as he pro- 
ceeded to erase the blackboard. 



Hauck: "When I was up in Mon- 
tana, I saw a mountain lion come right 
up to the camp one day. It was a fierce 
beast, but I, with great presence of 
mind, threw a bucket of water in its face 
and it slunk away." 

Barney: "Boys, I can vouch for the 
truth of that story. A few minutes after 
that happened I was coming down the 
side of the hill. I met this lion, and as is 
my habit, stopped to stroke its whiskers. 
Boys, those whiskers were wet." 



Roses are red 
Violets are blue, 
Some men smoke, 
Fu Manchu. 



Tom: "What would be the proper 
thing to say if, in carving the duck, $ 
should skid off the platter and into your 
neighbor's lap?" 

Morgan: "Be very courteous. Sa/ 
'May I trouble you for that duck'?" 



Dr. Bender: Why is your examin 3 ' 
tion paper covered with quotat'O' 1 
marks?" 

Pete: Isn't there a rule against pi 3 ' 
giarism? 



Hickory-Dickory-Dock 

Two mice ran up a clock. 

The clock struck one, 

And the other got away uninjured- 



Struble: Give a sentence contain' ' 
the word "buoyant." 

Stevens: A buoyant a girl were da 11 
cing. 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 1934 



PAGE THREE 



lods, 
rette 

boy, 
urn- 



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i of 

cold 
:er." 

/ell, 



lear 
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dian 



ikes, 



ding 
at a 



Jood 
the 



'e in 
pro- 



ton- 
right 
lerce 
> of 
face 

the 
after 

the 
as is 
kers. 



opcr 

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your 

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ation 



ed. 
da"' 



^Oflr SHOTS 

jvj w that Coach Mylin has signed a 
Jj, ee ,year contract at Bucknell, specu- 
lation is rife on the campus as to who 
Tj] be his successor. A number of suc- 
cessful college as well as high school 
coaches have applied for the Mylin va- 
cancy- The college is not yet ready to 
hand out any information regarding the 
position, but there is no doubt but that 
a very capable man will be elected to 
carry on in the place of "Hooks." 



Our basketball team met another one 
f those one-point reverses which has 
been so prevalent this season. Tough 
luck, fellows, but on to Albright, and 
s lay the Lions and Bears. 



The Flying Dutchmen will soon start 
their campaign for the top position in 
the Eastern Penna. baseball league, play- 
ing many league games and outside 



games 



with such teams as Penn State. A 



sixteen game schedule has been released, 
all games taking place in practically a 
month's time. However, with a veteran 
team, Coach Mylin should make a grand 
bow in his Lebanon Valley finale. 



What ho^the Ping Pong tournament. 
Get out your pings and pongs, fellows, 
and rattle away on those old tables, and 
may the champion be the champion in- 
deed. 



Maybe we re a little behind some of 
our contemporary sports writers in our 
prediction as to who will be the next 
L. V. coach. However, the reason we 
haven't predicted or stated is because 
we don't know. We would like to know 
the source of their information. 

Who threw that last apple? Why, the 
Editor, of course. 



Long, Varied Recital 
Given By Conservatory 



The student recital on Tuesday eve- 
ning, March 6, was well attended in 
spite of the numerous other functions 
taking place at the same time. The long 
recital was filled with pleasant surprises, 
showing many popular artists in other 
fields than their specialty. Each student 
did commendable work, and the hearty 
support of the audience repaid their ef- 
forts. • 

The program follows: 

T o a Wild Rose MacDowell 

T °rch Dance German 

Francis Shearer, piano 

The Ri S i ng s un Torjussen 

Feu Follet Rogers 

Beatrice Fink, piano 

% Heart at Thy Sweet Voice 

Saint-Saens 

Rae Anna Reber, cornet 

barcarolle in E Minor Faulkes 

Adorati °n Borowski 

p Jack Schuler, violin 

^ Ur Ple Shadows Ulric Cole 

^ Martha Elser, piano 

J ation Robert Franz 

he Heart of Her Q W. Cadman 

^ S °ng J. Brahms 

p Ida K. Hall, soprano 

3* d « Pecheu r De Fallu 

ria Ver a ~ , 

Granada; 

Matilda Bonanni, piano 

nUet on a Theme by Tschaikowsky 

Albert Stoessel 

r> Oleta Dietrick, violin 

eams - fo-r*. 

otoughton 

S Prin R °bert Heath, organ 

1 Bring to You Colored Toys 

The F t Carpenter 

Clouds Wid ° W Edwards 
• Charles 

^°mance Summy ' so P ran ° 

^ a nce f. Sibelius 

efrt *»J°lster Grieg 

AcCOrn Panists th G ° ynC ' Pian ° 
Ruth Bailey 
Nancy Bowman. 



Juniors, Frosh Varsity 
Win In Doubleheades 



The Juniors made a gala affair of the 
reopening of the gym by easily troun- 
cing the Frosh in the first annual inter- 
class basketball game of the present sea- 
son, 50-12. The game was so one-sided 
that even some of the most ardent Ju- 
nior rooters took pity on the stubborn 
but powerless yearlings and cheered 
them on. The upper-classmen scored 
sixteen points before the Frosh had 
chalked up their first tally, a foul shot. 

The Juniors presented a well-organ- 
ized squad which clicked perfectly 
against the weak opposition, and even 
when a whole new second team entered 
the fray, the first year men could not 
fare much better. Outstanding on the 
first team for the Juniors were Sincav- 
age at the center position, Arndt, at for- 
ward, and Whiting at guard. Brosious 
and Kell fought valiantly for the class 
of '37 but to little avail. Inexperience 
and lack of material seemed to be the 
causes for the poor showing of the 
Frosh. 

Following this game there was a more 
interesting encounter between the Fresh- 
man varsity and the Arrows, from Har- 
risburg, which the local team won, 54 
to 38. Although the Frosh had little 
trouble in defeating their opposition, the 
visitors put up a good scrap and were 
always in the game. It may have been 
that the size of the gym served as a 
handicap to them. 

The Frosh assumed an early lead, and 
then apparently didn't care for a while 
with the result that the Arrows began 
to rally. However, the first year squad 
found little difficulty in preventing a de- 
feat and settled down to a fast enough 
pace to keep a safe lead. The visitors 
seemed to have difficulty at passing the 
ball accurately and oftentimes lost the 
ball for this reason. Most of their scor- 
ing was made oni long shots, while the 
Frosh worked the ball in neatly and sank 
many baskets from underneath the goal. 



Muhlenberg Beats 
Lebanon Valley In 
Hectic Encounter 



LAST MINUTE GOAL WINS 



Freshmen Lose To Long's In 
Struggle Marked By Sec- 
ond Half Rally 



Lebanon Valley dropped another 
closely contested basketball game last 
Saturday night to the Muhlenberg 
"Mules" by the score of 40-39 on the 
Lebanon High School court. The local 
representatives led throughout most of 
the game, and apparently were sailing 
to another victory when the visitors be- 
gan a persistent spurt that advanced 
them into the lead during the last few 
minutes of play. The "Mules" undoubt- 
edly had a night "on" as evidenced in 
the fact that they seemed to have an 
uncanny ability to drop long shots. In 
fact, the winning goal was registered 
from a point three quarters of the way 
back from the basket by a player who 
had never before scored a field goal in 
inter-collegiate basketball. 

Lebanon Valley assumed an early 
lead in the first half and was never 
headed by the "Mules" once throughout 
this period. However, the boys from 
Allentown began to click early in the 
second half, and the game became a nip- 
and-tuck affair with first one side and 
then the other holding the lead. The 
Mylinmen also began a rally that brought 
the score to 38-38 with about twenty 
seconds to play when the spectacular 
long shot was sunk. A foul by "Bill" 
Smith was all the locals had opportu- 
nity to do in the way of retaliation. 

Saalfeld of the "Mules" took scoring 
honors with seventeen points, while 
Cochrane, also of the "Mules," and 
"Bill" Smith fought a close struggle for 



NO SATURDAY AFTER- 
NOON SERVICE AT THE 
ANNVILLE POST OFFICE 
EFFECTIVE MARCH 10, 
1934 



Due to economic reasons all win- 
dows in the Annville Post Office will 
close promptly at 1:00 p. m. each 
Saturday. No service of any kind 
will be given after that hour. 

The lobby will be open until 7:30 
p. m. The collection, dispatch, and 
receipt of mails remains unchanged. 
Incoming mail will be distributed to 
the lock boxes as usual. 

A. S. MILLER, P. M. 



second place honors with ten and nine 
points respectively. Probably the biggest 
factor in the locals' defeat was their in- 
ability to shoot fouls. They were able 
to register but seven out of twenty op- 
portunities. 

In a preliminary game between the 
Lebanon Valley Frosh and Long's Bak- 
ery, the locals were defeated to the tune 
of 44-37. As in the varsity encounter, 
the Valleymen led at half time but this 
decided advantage was soon overcome 
by the visitors. Snell and Billett played 
their usual "bang-up" game, and were 
the high scorers for the locals in the 
evening's fracas. Euston and Kirkess- 
ner bore the brunt of the burden for the 
Lebanon dribblers. 

Lineups : 

LEBANON VALLEY 
G. 

Barthold, f 3 1 

Patrizio, f 3 

Rust, f 3 

Rose, c 2 

Miller, c 2 4 

Light, g 1 1 

Williams, g 

Smith, g 4 1 



Ml'IILENBERG 



Rodgers, f 2 

Saalfeld, f 7 

Blank, f 

Cochrane, c 5 

Rosenberg, c 1 

Farris, g 1 



Totals 16 



LEBANON VALLEY FROSH 



G. 


F. 


Pts. 


3 


1 


7 


3 








3 





6 


2 





4 


2 


4 


8 


1 


1 


3 


1 





2 


4 


1 


9 


16 


7 


39 



G. 


F. 


Pts. 


2 





4 


7 


3 


17 





3 


3 


5 





10 


1 


1 


3 


1 


1 


3 











16 


8 


40 



Totals 



G. 


F. 


Pts. 


1 


3 


5 











7 


9 


23 


3 


1 


7 


1 





2 


12 


13 


37 



LONG'S BAKERY 



Rank, f 3 

Euston, f 5 

Kirkessner, c 1 5 

Romig, c , 1 

Boltz, g 1 

Lutz, g 3 



G. 


F. 


Pts. 


3 


3 


9 


5 


2 


12 


5 


1 


11 


1 





2 


1 


2 


1 


3 





6 









Totals 



8 44 



Weil-Known Lebanon 
Book Store to Move 



Miss Kate Bollman, proprietor of 
Bollman's book store, recently announced 
that on or before March 15 the location 
of her store will be changed from South 
Eighth street, where it has stood for 
years, to 628 Cumberland street. 

This favorite rendezvous of Lebanon 
Valley College students and other book 
lovers will be conducted on the same 
principles that have marked its continu- 
ance for many years. The moving of 
the large stock of books and stationer's 
goods has presented quite a problem, but 
in a week the genial personnel will be 
ready to serve the needs of literarv- 
minded customers at the new location. 



SAVANTS GO TO 
N. Y. CONVENTION 



Professor S. O. Grimm, James Sco:t 
and Edmund Umberger last week at- 
tended the regular quarterly meeting of 
the American Physical Society at Phv- 
sics building, Columbia University, New 
York City. They also spent some time 
at the meeting of the American Optical 
Society which was in session at the 
same time. 

The meetings consisted, for the most 
part, of lectures by the country's leading 
physicists who talked mostly about their 
research work and about two instru- 
ments, the spectrometer and the spectro- 
graph. The L. V. C. savants found these 
lectures very interesting. 

While in New York, Prof. Grimm 
and Messrs. Scott and Umberger visited 
Dr. Wagner at the New York hospital. 



SELSAM DEFENDS FRANCE 
IN CHAPEL ADDRESS 



(Continued from Page One) 



tained in the treatey which made ratifi- 
cation by all parties necessary. 

"LITTLE ENTENTE'' FORMED 

France was back where she had been 
before the war. Germany loomed large 
before her eyes. Safety lay in a dis- 
rupted and downtrodden Germany. 
France planned accordingly. The United 
States and Great Britain were absorbed 
in plans of economic nationalism and 
would be of no help to protection to 
France. Russia was busy with a great 
experiment of her own. Thus, with 
Serbia, Jugoslavia, Poland and Czecho- 
slovakia, France formed the present exist- 
ing "Little Entente". This group of 
countries forming a ring around Ger- 
many had proved to be an effective 
check against her rise in power until 
the Nazi party gained control recently. 

From this topic, Mr. Selsam went on 
to discussion of the League of Nations, 
with which organization he is very fa- 
miliar. He advocates internationalism 
and the League as its official organ but 
he thinks that the power of the League 
has been misused and broken so that it 
is no longer effective. Although his 
brief seemed to be in favor of France 
and her policies, he tried to be as im- 
partial as possible in his discussion. That 
France, through her alliances, was able 
to dominate the League and practically 
determine its policies was viewed as a 
natural development in her desire for 
security. Her treatment of the Germans 
when they applied for admission to the 
League and their subsequent withdrawal 
from it, was her only action meeting 
with his censure. 

MANOHURIAN QUESTION CITED 

Mr. Selsam claimed that the League 
never had a fair chance or fair trial. 
France utilized it for her own purposes, 
forced into this position by the action 
of the United States and England. Then, 
too, the deeds and accomplishments of 
the League were usually minimized or 
left out of the picture entirely by the. 
Great Powers. He cited especially the 
late Manchurian question and its League 
decision. Although the League judged 
it important enough to be broadcast 
through a tiresome six-hour program, the 
majority of the newspapers scarcely men- 
tioned it or if they did so it was in a 
most slighting fashion. 

All in all, Mr. Selsam concluded, we 
must not blame France. Security is all 
she desires. Everything at her command 
must not blame France. Security is all she 
desires. Everything at her command has 
failed her to date. An armed camp is 
her only chance, she feels. 

Mr. Selsam managed to inject a few 
thought provoking problems into the 
minds of his hearers although his speech 
was elementary enough to be readily 
and easily understood. He very ably 
presented a point of view difficult foi 
Americans to grasp. After his lecture, 
he defended his point of view when 
various questions were proposed to him. 



Earnest Cue Champ 
As Tournament Ends 



TOPS CULLATHER 100 TO 98 



Series of Safe Scratches Stud 
Showing of Skilled 
Shooting 



The final match in the pool tourna- 
ment which has been in progress for sev- 
eral weeks was played Saturday after- 
noon, March 3. The contestants were 
Frank Cullather and William Earnest, 
who had finished victoriously their four 
preliminary rounds. In the semi-finals 
Cullather had outscored Boran and Ear- 
nest had topped Shroyer. Both of those 
matches had been close, giving the final 
winners a difficult job. 

CULLATHER HAS EARLY LEAD 

The game Saturday promised to be a 
very interesting contest. The spectators 
were largely supporters of Cullather, so 
that he had the advantage of moral sup- 
port. The match began with very even 
scoring but with Cullather about ten 
points in the lead until the score was in 
the fifties. 

At this point in the game Cullather 
lost his lead by missing a shot which 
left an open board for Earnest. The re- 
sult was that when Cullather had scored 
a total of 74 points, Earnest had made 
96 with only four more necessary for 
the decision. 

MULTITUDINOUS SCRATCHES 

Then followed a series of safe shots 
and "scratches" for each, increasing the 
number which Earnest needed. In this 
time Cullather succeeded in taking off 
the balls which were pried loose from 
the pile. Before Earnest could increase 
his score beyond 96, Cullather had 
reached the 98 mark. The latter missed 
the ball which would have been his 99th, 
thinking too anxiously of his position 
for the next and final point. As a result, 
Earnest was left enough possible shots 
for him to score his hundred. 

The game therefore ended in a very 
well-matched fight but the scores of 100 
to 98 gave Earnest the victory and 
crowning him as champion of the pool 
tournament for 1934. 



COACH CHOOSES CAST 

FOR CLIO-PHILO PLAY 

(Continued from Page One) 

many humorous lines and incidents. 
Briefly, the story of the play is this: 
Death decides to take a holiday for three 
days. Within that period no one shall 
die, nor will any living matter continue 
to decay or grow old. Death takes on 
a mortal form and begins a quest for 
happiness. He finally finds it in the 
form of human or mortal love for Gra- 
zia, the heroine. As Death nears the end 
of the third day of his holiday, he be- 
gins to realize that he has not found 
true happiness, but an element of sor- 
row, since he finds it is nigh time to re- 
sume his former state. His pain is at 
leaving Grazia, and so he proposes the 
question to her if she would care to ac- 
company him. His love is reciprocated 
in her own self and she makes a posi- 
tive decision. 

The play will be directed by Dr. P. 
A. W. Wallace, who has directed all of 
Philo's plays for a number of years. He 
has announced the following tentative 
cast as a result of trials held Monday 
and Tuesday of this week. 

Duke Lambert DeWitt Essick 

Alda Sarah McAdam 

Rhoda Fenton Louise Gillan 

Duchess Stephanie Anne Matula 

Princess of San Luca Miriam Book 

Grazia Mildred Nye 

Cora Charlotte Weirick 

Coradds Allan Ranck 

Baron Cesarea Ray Johnson 

Eric Fenton Clyde Mentzer 

Major Whitread George Hiltner 

Fedele Allen Steffy 

Shadow Algire McFaul 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 1934 



Wig and Buckle To 
Give Old Morality 
'Everyman' Tonight 

J. ALLAN RANCK DIRECTS 



Acting Emphasized In Play Of 
Few Properties — Cast 
Is Large 



This evening at 8 o'clock in Engle 
Conservatory the Wig and Buckle will 
present the play "Everyman" as the fea- 
ture part of the March meeting of the 
club. The name, Wig and Buckle, was 
adopted as the name of the club at its 
February meeting, and henceforth it will 
be known by this name. Tonight's pro- 
duction is another step in the program 
of events of the Wig and Buckle, and 
as such will be under student direction 
and management. 

"Everyman" is one of the many mo- 
rality plays which were popular in Eng- 
land when drama made its first appear- 
ance. It is generally recognized as one 
of the best of its type and its value as a 
piece of art has gone undiminished 
through many, many repititions. As the 
play requires only a few properties and 
no change of scenery, the audience will 
find its interest centered alone in the act- 
ing, which is difficult to put across 
throughout the entire play. However, 
the actors have been practicing for sev- 
eral weeks, and hope that they know 
their parts well enough to make at least 
a creditable rendition. 

The play has been prepared under the 
direction of J. Allan Ranck, who has 
been assisted at various times by Dr. 
Wallace. There will be a large cast in 
this production, and among those ap- 
pearing will be Mildred Nye, Louise 
Shearer, Hazel March, Helen Earnest, 
Ruth Buck, Jean Harnish, Clyde Ment- 
zer, Allan Ranck, De Witt EssicK, 
Percy Clements, George Hiltner, Miller 
Schmuck, Allen Buzzell, Charles Hauck. 
Lester Krone, and Kenneth Eastland. 
Costumes will be in charge of Lena 
Cockshott, and properties in charge of 
Miller Schmuck. 



CLIO AND PHILO JOIN 

FOR JOINT SESSION 



(Continued from Page One) 



Announcement time arrived and Miller 
Schmuck as Dr. Butterwick explained all 
those announcements whose meanings 
might be a bit difficult to understand— 
such as "Band practice at 7:00 o'clock 
tonight." 

When the clock said nearly 9:15, Miss 
Kenyon, impersonated by Rose Dieter, 
entered in a great rush. With babble 
and confusion of tongues, she explained 
how sorry she was to be late but she 
had been detained outside. However, 
with her talent she was able to dance 
right back into favor again. 

The program ended, Dr. Lynch again 
arose and remarked upon the events. He 
concluded by announcing that instead o( 
classes a dance would be held and re- 
freshments would be served. 

To the tunes from a few of the Colle- 
gians who had Rambled in a great many 
resolves were made to attempt before 
long — to "see ourselves as others see us." 



"CONSERV DRAG" TO BE 
HELD TOMORROW NIGHT 



(Continued from Page One) 



The dance will be held from 8 o'clock 
until 11:45. The price of admission is 
fifteen cents per person, or twenty-five 
cents a couple. Every one is welcome — 
with or without a partner. The hosts 
and hostesses will see that every one 
gets a partner, and that all have a good 
time. 

Catherine Heckman and Tillie Bonanni 
are the committee on arrangements, and 
promise an evening of fun for all. 



Sophomores Win From 
Seniors In Thriller 

In the second game of the inter-class 
basketball tournament which is being 
sponsored by the "L" Club, the Sopho- 
more team won over the Seniors in a 
closely contested battle Tuesday night, 
to the score of 35-34. The game was 
characterized throughout by hard play- 
ing and thrills galore. At the end of the 
first half the score was tied at 18, ai.d 
not once at any stage of the game was 
either team much in the lead. The Se- 
niors were handicapped early in the con- 
test when "River" Jordan, because of an 
injured knee, was forced to leave the 
game. Volkins of the Seniors led in the 
scoring, coming through with 16 of his 
team's 34 points. "Palooka" also dis- 
played some excellent dribbling. Frank 
of the Sophs led his team with 1 1 points, 
Harnish following closely with 10. 

The spectators crowded in the bal- 
cony of the gymnasium enjoyed the bat- 
tle immensely, giving vent to their en- 
thusiasm by vociferous outbursts of deaf- 
ening applause from time to time as 
their respective favorites delighted them 
with exhibitions of dazzling teamwork. 

Lineup : 

SOPHOMORES 

G. F. Pts. 

Rader, f 2 4 

Frank, f 5 1 11 

Harnish, c 5 10 

Sponaugle, g 113 

Stephano, g 2 2 6 

Gilfillan, g 1 ! 

Huber, f 

Totals 15 5 35 

SENIORS 

G. F. Pts. 

Zech, f 

Jordan, f 

Lehman, c 3 1 7 

Volkins, g 7 2 16 

Kandrat, g 1 1 3 

Mentzer, f 1 2 

May, f 3 6 

Totals 15 4 34 



BABY BOOMERANG 



Imagine: 

Mrs. Stevenson failing to show up 
for a 3:30 French class on a beautiful 
blue Monday. Can it be attributed to 
the customary sour faces of the in- 
mates? 

The campus males in their best ties 
and neatly pressed suits daintily balan- 
cing their tea cups and devouring doz- 
ens of wafer-like sandwiches. 

Our reticent La Vie "chief" pushing a 
female around on the famous Roseland 
dance floor in the big bad city, New 
York. 

The campus cats being so completely 
snowed under that no new dirt could be 
spread. What a Utopia! For particu- 
lars see all students, all dorms, any time, 
and any place. 

(Speaking of skating, have you no- 
ticed "Marg" Kohler's fancy stepping 
around? Armed with an air cushion, 
non-skids, and a strong supporting arm 
we have seen her start out for Kreider's 
pond) . 



Ginny: I was quite upset when Jack 
kissed me. 

Martha: Ooh! Never been kissed be- 
fore? 

Ginny: Oh, yes, but never in a ca- 
noe." 



Bespectacled One 
Chortles Watch 
The Little Birdie 9 



Who is the man behind the glasses 
and the artist's tie? A new student break- 
ing into our ranks for the last lap of the 
second semester? Wrong again. Have- 
n't we seen him somewhere before? Oh! 
we have it— the photographer— Dame 
Fortune's gift to beautiful women and 
handsome men. Then, you say, what is 
he doing on Lebanon Valley territory? 
The secret is out— the man with the 
magic box has arrived from the big city 
to complete his share of the Quittie— co 
cause fair co-eds and others to spend 
hours preening themselves before their 
mirrors, only to have their carefully 
combed locks blown into disorder by the 
cold, unfriendly winds. 

Oh, this thing called art. How one 
will stand shivering on the "Ad" build- 
ing steps with a frozen smile playing on 
his lips merely to see his shivering coun- 
tenance glow with the rest of the gang 
when the year book comes out mick:t 
blaze and glory. Stragglers, feature pic- 
tures, and group photographs have been 
the principal diversions of the photogra- 
pher for his second stay on Lebanon 
Valley's campus. We wish him luck, 
and as far as faces go — do we need it? 



Girls Divide Debate 

With Elizabethtown 



Before a small but appreciative audi- 
ence the negative Lebanon Valley girls 
debating team made their debut with the 
affirmative team of Elizabethtown Col- 
lege, on the evening of March 6. It was 
the formal style of three speakers— with 
Louise Gillan, Winona Shroff, and Mari- 
an Leisey representing L. V. The af- 
firmative visiting group consisted of 
Miss Yohst, Miss Weist, and Miss Sie- 
grist. The decision, three to nothing, 
was in favor of the Lebanon Valley 
team. Judges for this occasion were: 
Miss Witmer, Miss Bowman, and Miss 
Peters, all teachers from the Lebanon 
public schools. 

The Lebanon Valley team that trav- 
eled was less fortunate than their col- 
lege sisters, as they came home with a 
defeat from a two to one decision. The 
affirmative team was represented by 
Helen Earnest, Grace Naugle, Kathryn 
Mowrey, and Elizabeth Schaak, alter- 
nate. The Elizabethtown representatives 
were Lydia Wagner, Helen Ott, Emilie 
J. Kraybill, and Leah Musser, alternate. 

Judges at Elizabethtown were: Dr. J. 
B. Thomas, professor of sociology at 
Millersville State Teachers College; 
Prof. Severance, principal of John Har- 
ris High School; Prof. Heagy, principal 
of Columbus High School. 

After the debate, the Lebanon Valley 
team was entertained at the reception 
for both debaters and judges. 



FLOWERS 

FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

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LEBANON, PENNA. 



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EAT AT ROEMIG'S 

DELICIOUS HOME-MADE 
ICE CREAM 



Doutr 





Always Reliable jaj 



Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 



Ping Pong Tourney 
Is Now Under Way 

Lebanon Valley College's first annual 
ping pong tournament is now under way. 
This tournament is being sponsored by 
the Y. M. C. A. and will be quite thrill- 
ing due to the fact that the very best 
players of the school are entered. 

There are 24 entrants, all of whom 
are quite capable of playing first rate 
ping pong. There have been six players 
chosen who are considered the best of 
the entrants, these being. Edgar Schan- 
bacher, William Fishburn, Richard Wal- 
born, C. (Rev.) Hitz, Fred Lehman, and 
Allan Ranck. It is believed that one of 
the above mentioned will win the tour- 
nament although there will probably be 
many upsets due to the ability of all 
the players entered. 

The following are the men who have 
designated their desire to play in the 
tournament: Walborn, Fishburn, Ranck, 
Lehman, Cullather, Holtzman, Glen, 
Thompson, Monn, Bolton, Mentzer, R. 
Smith, Schanbacker, Lazin, Donmoyer, 
Ax, Hitz, Gerber, Huber, Bachman, M. 
Edwards, T. Edwards, Palatini, and 
Karcher. 

This tournament is being played under 
regular ping pong rules and will be a 
round robin tournament. That means 
that every contestant will meet every 
other contestant sometime throughout 
the matches. The two players with the 
best averages after each entry plays 
each other entry will meet in a final sev- 
en game match to decide the champion 
of Lebanon Valley College. 



Freddy: Say the words that will make 
me happy. 

Sally: Stay single. 

J. E. GIPPLE 
Fire Insurance and Real Estate 
1251 Market Street 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



KREAMER BROS. 



EASY ELECTRIC WASHERS 
GAS STOVES AND RANGES 
RUGS AND LINOLEUMS 
PICTURE FRAMING 



Furniture - - Undertaking 



Phone 14 4 ANNVILL.E, PA. 



AFTER MARCH 1 5TH 

BOLLMAN'S 

Book and Stationery 
Store 

WILL BE AT 

628 Cumberland St. 
Lebanon 

COME AND SEE US 



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BEST SHORT ATTRACTIONS 



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MAIN STREET 



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CONTRACTORS 

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THE PEHNWa Y 




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Successful 
[others' Week-end 




Don't Forget 
Delphian Benefit 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



VOL. X 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, FRIDAY, MARCH 16, 1934 



No. 25 



Mother's Week-End 
At Lebanon Valley 
Is Huge Success 

MORE THAN FIFTY ATTEND 

Xe s, Concert, Basketball Games 
provide Entertainment For 
Proud Parents 



The first Mothers' Week-end at Leba- 
non Valley which was held March 10 
and 11 proved to be a successful experi- 
ment. More than fifty mothers attended 
at least part of the program. More than 
half this number were the guests of the 
college for both days. This large group 
was accommodated only through the co- 
operation of the entire college group. 
The members of the faculty offered their 
homes to any who could not be provided 
for in the dormitories. The college office 
furnished the' meals for the guests. Al- 
though this week-end was planned as a 
Y. W. C. A. project, it soon became a 
college event in which every student and 
member of the faculty took part. To 
this cooperation, the success of the week- 
end is due. 

Saturday the first scheduled event was 
dinner at noon in the college dining hall. 
Fortunately, the new curtains had ar- 
rived in time for this occasion. Each ta- 
ble boasted a centerpiece of sweet-peas 
and daisies. 

The afternoon held two events—a 
girls' basketball game and a concert. 
Many mothers were present to see the 
L. V. girls beat Albright. After the 
game, a concert was given in Engle hall. 
The program consisted of two parts. The 
first was a group of solo numbers by 
Ethel Keller, Rae Anna Reber, Helen 
Summy, and Martha Elser. Then the 
girls' band played a group of seven 
numbers. This was the first performance 
°f this group. It is hoped that they may 
be heard again in the near future. 

Saturday evening the mothers chose 
their own entertainment. Many went to 
Lebanon to see the men's basketball team 
beat Albright. Others went to the shows 
0r to the stores in Lebanon. Those who 
stayed in Annville played games in 
N °rth Hall parlor. 

The mothers were especially invited to 
attend Sunday school and worship at 
(Continued on Page 3, Column 1) 



Impromptu Musicale 

Held for Mothers 



lot 



th 



Was 



^vas 



u Qh th 



e crowd was small, each class 



At the conclusion of the tea which 
was the last feature of Mothers' Week- 
end planned by the "Y" Cabinet, the 
girls with their mothers and guests were 
invited to go up to Clio Hall on North 
Hall's second floor where a brTef im- 
promptu program was offered. Miss Hel- 
en Summy sang very charmingly a group 
of old favorite melodies. 

Miss Sara Katherine McAdam, well 
known for her unique impersonations, 
was asked to repeat the one she present- 
ed in Clio meeting on Friday evening. 
She portrayed Princess Bust-off, from 
some far-off vague kingdom. Her vari- 
ous emotions and actions were explained 
by Miss Helen Earnest. To bring on 
these strange moods Miss Lois Harbold 
provided music at the piano. Finally, 
Mrs. Harnish from Palmyra sang. It 
was an extreme pleasure for the guests. 
Her first number was "The World is 
Waiting for the Sunrise." Next she sang 
a request number. She was accompanied 
on the piano by Miss Grace Naugle. 

With greetings and goodbyes inter- 
mingled, the mothers were forced to 
leave for their homes. 



Clio Entertained 
By Junior Members 



Y.M.C.A. Elections 
Of Cabinet Officers 
Held Last Thursday 



EARNEST IS ANNOUNCER 



Varied Program Involves Sawed- 
Off Twins, Princess Bust- 
Off, Et Al 



Sophomores Assume 
Class Lead, 45 - 36, 
In Rough Struggle 

^ he Sophomores continued to main- 
ln an unblemished record in the class I 
^sketball race by defeating the Juniors j 
" 36 m a fast, hard-fought game Tues- 
*T night on the local ice-box floor. The 
^ test w as a nip aflST tuck affair through- { 
until the final few minutes when the 
th ° P s uncorked a barrage of baskets 
Put them well into the lead. 
the spectators the affair looked 
ciall 3n inc * oor football game, espe- 
y in the second half when a foul 
as rare as a fair player. Al- 



cl am Wel1 awarded for its efforts by 
more ° r ° Us outbursts from several of the 

Ste r 5ty " throated backers. 
tor s , e ^, ans was high scorer for the vic- 
f 0r ^^ lle Kanoff took tallying honors 

Sut>s fitut S ' Neither team used many 
non e ^ e J uruors because they had 
ed no a " d tne Sophs because they need- 

(c e In the ** rst nal *' botri teams 
° nti nued on Page 4, Column 1 ) 



The regular weekly meeting of the 
Clionian Literary Society was held in 
the hall last Friday evening. Miss Miri- 
am Book, the president, presided at the 
business session. Clio decided to aug- 
ment again their already attractive col- 
lection of modernistic furniture with 
card tables and lamps. 

This week the Junior class members 
planned the entertainment. With the as- 
sistance of those who participated, Helen 
Earnest, who acted as announcer, pro- 
vided many a laugh. Since Clio "is a 
literary society" Miss Earnest and her 
aids saw fit to present an inspirational 
and uplifting literary program. The first 
number was by Alma Cline, "that south 
ern peach," who, in short dress and big 
hair ribbon, recounted the adventures of 
the "Mother of Little Maud and Dear 
Little Maud" in escaping from the car- 
riage with run-away horses. 

From the pages of great literature were 
taken a few living pictures and shown to 
the guests. First, Lena Cockshott, as the 
White Sister, showed a tender scene. 
Sarah Heilman, next as Cleopatra, made 
it easy to understand why Antony was 
led astray. The third picture was of the 
Three Fates but two by unknown means 
were seduced and only Rebecca Adams 
appeared. No group of literary pictures 
would be complete without one from the 
great novel of Edgar Rice Burroughs, 
"Tarzan and the Ape Woman." In this 
case, however, the costumes were shy 
and the tables were turned. Margaret 
Early was shown with Elizabeth Carl in 
tow. Lastly, Frances Keiser appeared 
as a pleasing representation of Cupid. 

Two renowned personages were pre- 
sented next, the Sawed-off Twins, Rose 
Dieter and Peggy Weaver. These two 
(Continued on Page 4, Column 3) 



MENTZER NEW PRESIDENT 



Harnish, Cassel, And Loose Are 
Elected To Other 
Offices 

The term of office of the Young Men's 
Christian Association expired the first 
Tuesday of this month, March 6. Elec- 
tions for the following year were held in 
the men's dormitory on the following 
Thursday. The polls were opened in the 
afternoon from 1:00 until 4:00 with the 
nominees for office being as follows: 

W. Mentzer and R. Walborn, presi- 
dent; J. Glen and S. Harnish, vice-presi- 
dent; M. Schmuck and R. Cassel, trea- 
surer; T. Loose and L. Straub, secretary. 

The men's choice for president of the 
association was Warren Mentzer, who' 
has for the past term served as vice- 
prerident. His experience within the or- 
ganization is sufficient qualification for 
his election. Mr. Mentzer has also been 
proving his ability and dependability 
throughout the year. Each Sunday he 
conducts service at a mission church in 
addition to his contributions to the camp- 
us activities such as Life Work Recruits 
and society. Mr. Mentzer is a minister- 
ial student from Valley View and wor- 
thy of the high hor... or his new office. 

The rest of the newly-elected officers 
are Ted Loose, secretary; Samuel Har- 
nish, vice-president, and Robert Cassell, 
treasurer. Of these three, Cassel and 
Loose have had experience in "Y" work. 
Cassel served as secretary of the last 
year's cabinet, while Loose was elected 
president of the Freshman cabinet at the 
beginning of this school year. Although 
Mr. Harnish hai had no previous service 
in the work as such, his interest and zeal 
in such activity makes him worthy of the 
place on the cabinet. 

These new officers, together with the 
committee chairmen whose names have 
not yet been announced, will be installed 
into the duties of their office Thursday 
morning in the annual chapel service in 
which both Y. M. and Y. W. C. A. 
cooperate. 



Albright Debaters 
Win Two Encounters 

VICTORIES DECISIVE 



Forensic Lions Shatter Lebanon 
Valley Hopes of Clean 
Sweep 



Glee Club and Violin 
Students on Radio Hour 



Meeting the debating team of Al- 
bright in a dual debate Monday, March 
12, the men's affirmative and negative 
teams of Lebanon Valley attempted to 
continue the rout of Albright teams 
which the basketball teams started the 
Saturday before. However, their efforts 
were in vain and the Lebanon Valley de- 
baters lost both decisions. The affirma- 
tive lost to the Albright negative by a 
3-0 score at Reading, while Lebanon 
Valley's negative lost by a 26-4 change 
of opinion vote in the debate held in 
Philo Hall. 

The team which journeyed to Al- 
bright was composed of Robert Etter, 
Mark Hostetter, and Harold Hollings- 
worth. The debate there was conducted 
(Continued on Page 2, Column 3) 



Tuesday evening, March 13, the Leb- 
anon Valley College radio hour present- 
ed an all-musical program consisting of 
selections by the Glee Club and violin 
numbers by Miss Martha Elser and Mr. 
Russell Hatz. 

The Glee Club, under the direction of 
Professor Edward Rutledge, opened the 
program with the delightful "Salutation" 
by Gaines. Next were given Elgar's 
"The Snow," Miss Elser and Mr. Hatz 
playing the obligato for two violins, and 
the inspiring "The Bells of Notre Dame" 
by Klemm. 

Miss Elser played an unusual violin 
solo, "The Humming Bird" by Drdla. 

Mr. Rutledge selected next for the 
Glee Club three American folk songs: 
first, a creole— "Ay, Ay, Ay," and then 
two negro — "Go Down Moses" and 
"Scandalize My Name." 

Miss Elser again played a violin solo, 
this time the difficult "Spanish Dance" 
by Rehfeld. 

Four more selections by the Glee Club 
closed the program: "Sylvia" by Speaks; 
"Italian Street Song" by Herbert; "Lulla- 
by" by Brahms, and "Halleluia, Amen" 
by Handel. The accompanist for the en- 
tire program was Miss Ruth Bailey. 



Last of Series of 
Class Teas Is Held 



Basketeers Take 
Three Tilts From 
Albright Rivals 

VARSITY WINS, 37 TO 31 



FRESHMEN ENTERTAINED 



Class Cousins Provide Programs 
For Afternoon Guests of 
Mrs. Lynch 



Yesterday marked the close of a series 
of delightful teas given this spring by 
Mrs. Lynch to members of the various 
Lynch to the members of the various 
classes. On Thursday, March 1, the 
Junior class was entertained. In addi- 
tion to jig-saw puzzles, block puzzles and 
anagrams, a splendid program was pre- 
sented. Members of the Freshman class 
were featured. Miss Ruth Buck played 
skillfully an entertaining piano number. 

Miss Gayle Mountz in her usual 
charming manner sang two familiar and 
lovely airs, "Cloud Shadows" by Ed- 
wards and "Trees" by Rasbach. Russell 
Hatz followed with a violin selection. 
Mr. Hatz's performances always merit 
high praise. 

The program at the Sophomore tea 
was provided by three Senior girls. Miss 
Matilda Bonanni sang "Habanera" (Car- 
men), and "The Cuckoo Clock," which 
met with the instantaneous approval of 
her listeners. Miss Margaret Early fol- 
lowed with a piano number of the type 
her audiences can expect— difficult and 
executed with extreme skill. The next 
feature was by the versatile Miss Kath- 
ryn Mowrey who gave a reading. The 
program was brought to a close with 
the singing of several college songs. 

.At the recent Freshman tea, Miss Le- 
nora Reeder, soprano, sang and Robert 
Sheirer entertained with a bassoon solo. 

The girls who served at these teas 
were in each case class cousins of the 
guests. At the Junior tea, Misses Ruth 
Buck, Gayle Mountz, Maxine Early and 
Grace Naugle served. At the Sophomore 
tea the Senior girls, Misses Mary Gos- 
sard, Helen Lane, Minna Wolfskeil, 
Kathryn Mowrey, Matilda Bonanni and 
Margaret Early attended. The freshmen 
were served today by Junior girls. 



Blubelles And Frosh Also Gain 
Decisions Over Read- 
ing Lions 



Lebanon Valley's Flying Dutchmen 
came from behind in a sparkling second 
half rally to defeat their traditional ri- 
vals, Albright's Lions, by a 37-31 score 
on the Lebanon High court Saturday 
night before one of the largest crowds 
of the 1934 basketball campaign. 

Victory enabled the Blue and White 
to close their court season by clinching 
fourth place in the Eastern Pennsylvania 
Collegiate court league. Saturday's bat- 
tle was a typical Lebanon Valley-Al- 
bright clash and was one of the roughest 
games played this year. 

Albright led throughout the first half 
and played rings around Coach Mylin's 
basketeers to assume what loomed as a 
mighty 22-12 lead at half time. 

Coming out at the second half, "Ra- 
dio" De Franco immediately dropped a 
twin-pointer for the Lions to double the 
count, 24-12. Then Lebanon Valley 
came into action. 

With "Bee" Rust, Bill Smith and 
"Grap" Miller putting on the pressure, 
Lebanon Valley dropped goal after goal 
through the cords, scoring 19 straight 
points to forge ahead, 31-24, with five 
minutes to go, before Oslislo broke the 
spell to dump a double-header through 
the nets for Albright. 

Lebanon Valley's 19 point drive for 
victory was the most sustained scoring 
drive exhibited by any team in league 
competition this season. 

Lebanon Valley's 19-point drive for 
out the remainder of the game with Shipe 
making a couple of goals to boost the 
Red and White score. 

Charlie "Bee" Rust was the high scor- 
er of the game with 13 points, while Bill 
Smith was a close second with 11. AH 
of Albright's scoring was dene by De 
Franco, Shipe, Ross and Osl'sio. 

In the preliminary the Blue and White 
Frosh trimmed the Albright first year 
(Continued on Page 3, Column 5) 



Favorites Advance 
In Hard Matches In 
Ping Pong Tourney 

The first annual ping-pong tourna- 
ment sponsored by the Y. M. C. A. of 
Lebanon Valley College is well under 
way. The list of entries comprises about 
twenty-five of the best players in the 
school. 

The manner in which it is conducted is 
fair to all participants who oppose one 
another in the tournament. After all 
matches are played, a final analysis is 
taken to see which two have the highest 
ranking. These in turn meet one an- 
other in a match consisting of nine games 
to decide what individual is the outstand- 
ing ping-pong player in the college. 
SCHANBACHER STARS 

The most outstanding player to date 
is Schanbacher who has swept aside his 
opposition without much difficulty as the 
result of losing only two out of a total 
of thirty-five games. Some experts claim 
that he will win the tournament, and the 
best that the other contestants can do is 
fight for second place which carries with 
(Continued on Page 4, Column 3) 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 16, 1934 



Ha Viz Collegtemte 

ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Under 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Edmund Umberger, '34 .. .Editor-in-Chief 

Kathryn Mowrey, '34 Associate Editor 

Richard Schrelber. '34. .Managing Editor 
Richard Baus. '37 Asst. Man. Editor 

REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Martha Krelder, '34 
Allan Ranck, '34 
Elizabeth Schaak, '34 
Helen Earnest, '35 
Sylvia Evelev, '36 

David Yake, '36 General Reporters 

Christine Gruber, '34 Conservatory 

DeWitt Essick, '34 

George Hiltner, '35 Athletics 

Catherine Wagner, '35 Alumni 

Clyde Mentzer, '34 Philokosmian 

Robert Cassel, '36 Kalozetean 

Jane Shellenberger, '36 Clionian 

Marietta Ooi, '35 Delphian 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Jack Todd, '34 Business Manager 

Kenneth Sheaffer, '35. Asst. Bus. Manager 
Allen Buzzell, '34 .. .Circulation Manager 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 



Single Copies 5 cents 

Subscription $1-00 per year 



Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter, under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



FRIDAY, MARCH 16, 1934 



WHAT! AGAIN? 



The great success which was the lot 
of the recent Mothers' Week-end can 
be attributed largely to the cooperation 
of the girls in arranging for their mo- 
thers' presence on the designated days. 
The Y. W. C. A. cabinet, although sore- 
ly pressed to provide for the unexpected- 
ly large number of visitors, had a mini- 
mum of trouble with which to contend. 
The rewarding of the girls' efforts seems 
to be the certainty that Mothers' Week- 
end will be an annual fixture at Lebanon 
Valley as long as mothers are interested 
in their daughters. 

At the same time, it conveys a power- 
ful suggestion to the male element on 
the campus to have a corresponding 
event for the fathers of the boys. Many 
schools the size of Lebanon Valley have 
Dads' Day or similar events which pro- 
vide a great deal of enjoyment for the 
male parents. As was pointed out in last 
week's La Vie Collegienne, it is the 
function of the Y. M. C. A., newly elect- 
ed, to survey the situation, decide upon 
the practicability of having such an 
event, and then make the necessary ar- 
rangements. Possibly next year, if not 
this spring, L. V. fathers will have an 
opportunity to visit the campus, and to 
see their sons "in action." 



ALUMNI NOTES 



Miss Mary L. Snyder recently became 
the bride of Charles R. Smith. The cere- 
mony took place in St. Mark's Reformed 
church, Lebanon. The Rev. H. J. Her- 
ber officiated. The bride, who is the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Monroe G. 
Snyder, 1400 King street, Avon, is a 
graduate of Lebanon Valley College, 
'30. Her husband, a son of Paul Smith, 
works at a local publishing house. 



Miss Caroline G. Rowe recently be- 
came the bride of Theodore C. Walker. 
The ceremony was held in Grace Luth- 
eran church, Shillington. The Rev. Vic- 
tor A. Kroninger, pastor, officiated. The 
bride is a daughter of Mrs. Frederick 
Homas, 118 Chestnut street, Shillington. 
Mr. Walker is a son of Mr. and Mrs. 
C. P. Walker, 1129 Oley street, Read- 
ing. He is a graduate of Lebanon Valley 
College, '33. Mr. Walker was a music 
student. At present, he is Federal Music 
Supervisor for the city of Reading. 



CONSERVATORY NOTES 



Members of the Lebanon Harmonia 
Circle were entertained by a number of 
pupils of the Conservatory of Music in 
a recital given in the Lebanon Woman's 
Club on Monday evening. 

The program included: "Andante" 
(Von Dittersdorf ) , "Scherzo" (Mendels- 
sohn), by a stringe quartet under the 
tutelage of Professor Carmean. The in- 
strumentalists were Misses Martha El- 
ser, Oleta Dietrich and Jane Goodyear, 
and Russell Hatz. 

Anthony jagnesak, a talented flutist, 
played "On Wings of Song," by Men- 
delssohn, and "The Nightingale," by 
Don Juan. 

Miss Matilda Bonanni presented "Rise 
Up and Reach the Stars," by Coates; 
"Gypsy Life," by Edwards, and "The 
Cuckoo," by Lehman. 

Earl linger, cornetist, and Frank Bry- 
an, trombonist, ably presented a duet, 
rendering "The Song of Songs" by 
Smith, and "Pals" by Barnard. 

One of the rarest of solo instruments, 
the basso6n, was capably handled by 
Robert Scheirer in rendering "Air Varie, 
Lucy Long" by Godfrey. 

Dale Roth, tenor soloist, delighted his 
audience with renditions of the follow- 
ing: "Invictus" by Hugh; "Bird Songs 
at Eventide" by Coates and "Banjo 
Song" by Homer. 

Edmund Umberger, clarinetist, and 
Anthony Jagnesak presented a pleasing 
duet entitled "Landler, Dreamy Mo- 
ments" by Ehrich. 

Miss Martha Elser closed the program 
with exceptional violin selections, "Ro- 
mance in F"— Beethoven, and "Humming 
Bird" by Drdla. 




ADMINISTRATION NOTES 



TEAS ARE PRACTICAL 



The unprecedented participation in the 
series of teas by the dormitory and day 
men has been a source of satisfaction to 
those who guide our social destinies here 
at L. V. C. More and more men are 
realizing the advantages to be gained by 
attendance at these purely social func- 
tions, and have taken advantage of the 
recent opportunities. 

Nevertheless, certain Philistines in our 
midst have voiced their disapproval of 
the so-called "tea-hounds," and with fa- 
miliar inclination of their little fingers, 
have remained absent from these events, 
in truly masculine detachment. Too late 
will they realize that "the rugged life" is 
not the acme of existence, and that cer- 
tain little social graces are expected from 
college graduates. 



Richard Slaybaugh and Margaret 
Early have led the chapel singing last 
week and this week respectively. Both 
student conductors did very fine work. 



Miss Gillespie, Mrs. Carmean, Mrs. 
Bender, E. Umberger and Tony Jagne- 
sak went to York on Tuesday evening 
where they heard the famous Barrere 
trio, a combination of flute, harp and 
'cello in a chamber music concert. 



Local Students To 

Receive Federal Aid 



In accordance with the new federal 
policy, aid is now being given to col- 
lege students in need of financial help. 
This is handled directly by the state, 
and it was decided that 10 per cent of 
the number of fulltime students will be 
benefited. On our campus the number 
is therefore limited to 35. At present 
there are 1 3 working but more will be 
enrolled next month. The jobs must be 
new, and include tutoring, clerical and 
janitorial work. However, soon this will 
be extended to work on grounds and 
buildings. 



RICHARD D. SCHREIBER 



Richard D. (Dicky) Schreiber, genial 
managing editor of La Vie Collegienne, 
recently received a well-merited honor 
when he was awarded a prize for draw- 
ing the best map of Germany in a con- 
test for the students of Prof. Lietzau's 
German 16 class. 

The prize is a personally-inscribed 
volume "The Art of Greece," acquired 
by Dr. Lietzau during her European so- 
journs. In order to qualify for this 
award, the redoubtable Dicky had to 
win over stern competition. His entry 
in the contest was tinted in beautiful 
pastel shades. The fortunate winner, in 
an interview today, stated, "I have de- 
rived considerable, and I may say, ut- 
most enjoyment and satisfaction from 
frequent and careful study of the many 
beautiful illustrations in this lovely gift." 



ALBRIGHT DEBATERS 

WIN TWO ENCOUNTERS 



(Continued from Page One) 



along the traditional three-man style, 
and was judged by three judges. The 
unanimous 3-0 decision against the local 
team is no reflection upon their work, for 
the debate was closely contested 
throughout. 

No judges were secured for the debate 
here at Lebanon Valley, and therefore 
both teams agreed to alter the method of 
debate and give the audience a change 
of opinion vote. As it was finally agreed 
upon, the method was a slight modifica- 
tion of the Oregon style of debate, but 
instead of two men on each side there 
were three. Moreover, the first two 
speakers on the affirmative spoke con- 
secutively for ten minutes each, and then 
the first two negative speakers did the 
same thing. From that point on, the 
regular Oregon style was followed, with 
a ten-minute period of questioning and 
summarizing for each side. 

The method of voting decided upon 
was an innovation in local debating ac- 
tivities, for it was the first time a change 
of opinion vote was followed. The audi- 
ence was given ballots before the debate 
began, and then was asked to record its 
opinion either ( 1 ) strongly favorable to 
the N.R.A.; (2) mildly favorable; (3) 
neutral; (4) mildly opposed; (5) strong- 
ly opposed; and after the debate record 
its opinion on the reverse side of the bal- 
lot. Upon counting the ballots, it was 
found that Albright had gained 26 points 
by a shift of votes to their side, while 
Lebanon Valley only succeeded in shift- 
ing four votes over to their side. Thus 
the final score was 26-4 in favor of Al- 
bright. 

Those debating here for Lebanon Val» 
ley were Jack Morris, Robert Womer, 
and Calvin Reber, while their opponents 
from Albright were Irvin Batdorf, New- 
ton Danford, and Elliott Goldstan, with 
Le Roy Garrigan as alternate. Prof. 
Stonecipher presided over the debate. 



February 28— Speaker at a Lenten 
service in Manheim Evangelical church. 

March 3— Faculty Conference of the 
Y. M. C. A. in the Penn-Harris hotel in 
Harrisburg. « 

March 4— Delivered the sermon at St. 
Mark's Reformed Church in the morning 
service. Spoke at the United Brethren 
church of Newburg in the evening. 

March 6 — Presented a humorous 
speech at a meeting of the Men's Friend- 
ly Bible class of the Sixth Street United 
Brethren church, Harrisburg. 

March 8— Acted as judge at a debate 
between Juniata College and Albright 
College held in the Reading Northeast 
Junior high school. 

March 11-12— Was unable because of 
illness to attend to duties, but they were 
assumed by Dr. Stonecipher who on 
Sunday morning attended the Booster 
service in the Lebanon Trinity United 
Brethren church and preached the ser- 
mon at the Ephrata church Sunday eve- 
ning. 

March 16— A meeting of the Finance, 
Committee has been called and will meet 
at the college. 

March 18— Will preach at the morn- 
ing worship of the Lebanon Memorial 
church. In the evening Shepherdstown 
church of the United Brethren will have 
the president as guest speaker. 

March 19— Will deliver an address at 
a dinner at Albright College. 

March 22— Will speak at the Union 
Lenten services in Millersburg. 



CONCERT GIVEN 
BY GIRLS' BAND 

As part of the entertainment provided 
for Mothers' Week-end, a concert fea- 
turing the girls' band and soloists was 
given in Engle Hall on Saturday after- 
noon. 

Because of illness, Dr. Lynch was un- 
able to be present as originally sched- 
uled, so Dr. Alvin Stonecipher took his 
place in formally welcoming all the 
mothers to the campus. 

The interesting program which was 
given follows: 

Toccato and Fugue in D Minor Bach 

Ethel Keller, organ 
My Heart at Thy Sweet Voice 

Saint-Saens 

Clouds Charles 

The Fisher's Widow Edwards 

When I Bring You Colored Toys 

Carpenter 
Helen Summy, soprano 

Air for G String Bach 

Allegro Fiocco 

Martha Elser, violin 
Intermission. 
Girls' band: 

March, Warming Up Ribble 

Marche Pontificale Gounod 

Mexican Serenade, La Golondrina 

Serradell 

Promotion Chenette 

Overture, Neptune Eisenburg 

College Songs— Lebanon Valley, Vic- 
tory, Alma Mate". 



Society Notes 



Kalozetean Literary Society has 
completed all its plans for the coming 
anniversary. The play "Hayfever" is 
to be given on March 23 in coopera- 
tion with Delphian Literary Society. 

The Penn-Harris hotel again will 
be the scene of a Lebanon Valley 
function when the annual dinner 
dance is held March 24. The pro- 
gram is in the keeping of Earl Hoov- 
er. Through his efforts, Dan Gre- 
gory's orchestra has been secured. At 
a business meeting recently various 
program committees were announced. 
There are no indications that there 
will be anything spared in order to 
make the dance program as eminent 
compared to former years. 




Bill— Would you give me a match? 

Dick— O. K. Here it is. 

Bill— Well, can you beat that? r V( 
forgotten my cigarettes. 

Dick— That's too bad; give me back 
my match. 



Another Mae West joke: 

One day Mae was putting on her 
thickly-padded costume for "She Don e 
Him Wrong." A group of girls stand- 
ing around began to laugh. 

'Heh, heh, heh," echoed Miss West 
"just laughing at my expanse, eh?" 



Blind Man at Newspaper Stand—I'd 
like to buy a magazine. 

Vendor— But you can't read. 

B. M. at N. S.— I Know, but I can 
look at the pictures. 



Visitor— Does the water always come 
through the roof like that? 

Landlord — No, sir, only when it rains. 



Notice at tennis court— "Players Must 
Wear Tennis Shoes Only." 

Comment— a new form of nudism? 



"You say you are subject to fits?" 

"Yes." 

"What do you do when you have 

one?" 

"Oh, just walk back and froth." 



"What kind of oil do you use in your 
car, Bill?" 

"Well, I usually start out bv telling 
them I'm lonely." 



I never learned until I got to lab 
That a Moment is longer 'an sixty 

secon's. 

That a Couple ain't a feller an' a gal. 

That an Electrolyte don't get bright 
when yuh push the button. 

That a Polar Compound don't have 
white fur. 

That Atom wasn't the first man. 

That a Flask used in chem is different 
from the kind I've seen. 

That a Beaker ain't a guy's schnozzk-. 

That the Calorie ain't the top balcony. 

That Chem ain't the opposite o' Gone 

That a Grid Circuit ain't a Pro foot- 
ball league. 

That to Dyne don't mean to eat. 



Papa: "What does '50' on your grade 
card mean, Dwight?" 

D. D. G.: "Oh— er— that must— that 
must have been the temperature of the 
room where I took the test." 



Y. M. C. A. Vesper 
Services Conducted 
By Retiring Cabinet 

The vesper services of the Y. M- ^ 
A. were conducted Sunday evening f° r 
the last time under the supervision of 
retiring cabinet. Raymond B. Johnson- 
under whose guidance these worsh'P 
periods have been planned, conduct 
the devotions for the evening. His scflP' 
ture lesson was chosen from Romans 
a very appropriate selection for the ° c 
ca-ion. 

The retiring president of the assod 3 
tion was the speaker. He express 
thanks in behalf of the cabinet for 
student cooperation in the vesper sc rV 
ices and regrets at the close of a hal 7! 
t^rm of office. As a devotional thou9 , 



ctic 3 ' 
,eet 



he proposed worship as a most pra 
ba^is on which all Christians can 111 
A true spirit of worship consists or 
following : Relaxation, imagination, ^ 



ing problems, self-analysis, and a V ot 



ing of desires, hopes, and aims, 
worship is worthwhile and fruitful" 
matter what the creed or who the ,n 
vidual. The meeting was closed vvith 
benediction. 



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LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 16, 1934 



PAGE THREE 



itch? 

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Varsity, Belles, Plebes Win on Saturday 



MOTHERS' WEEK END IS 
1 HUGE SUCCESS AT L. V. 

(Continued from Page One) 



tne college church. The students— repre- 
jented by Lena Cockshott and Kathryn 
fvlowrey-— had a special part in the wor- 
ship s«r vice - 
The final event of the week-end was 

tea in North Hall parlor. More than 
eighty students and guests were present 
a t this time. Mrs. Green, Mrs. Struble, 
a nd Miss Myers poured. This was a 
cr0 wning event of an interesting pro- 
gram. 

At lunch Saturday evening the fresh- 
man and sophomore Y. W. cabinets pre- 
sented each mother a rose. So from 
freshman to senior, from janitor to presi- 
dent--all helped to make this week-end 
a long-remembered time. 

Among the guests were: Mrs. Weav- 
er, Mrs. Buck, Mrs. Roberts, Mrs. Holtz- 
man, Mrs. March, Isabelle Runk, Ursula 
Herbert, and Margaret Wing of Harris- 
burg; Mrs. Webb of Gettysburg; Mrs. 
and Evelyn Goyne of Mahanoy City; 



Mrs. Harbold of Dallastown; Mrs. Mc- 
Creary of Dillsburg; Mrs. Stabley and 
Mrs. Smith, Red Lion; Mrs. Longeneck- 
er, Agnes and Mrs. Matula, Middle- 
town; Mrs. Gillan, Penbrook; Mrs. Mow- 
rey, New Cumberland; Mrs. Naugle, Le- 
moyne; Mrs. McAllister, Mechanicsburg; 
Mrs. Weirick and Mrs. Meckley, Enola; 
Mrs. Kohler, Smithburg, Md.; Mrs. Faust 
and Mrs. Shoemaker, Waynesboro; Mrs. 
Francis, Boyertown; Mrs. Miller, Pen- 
nington, N. J.; Mrs. Reber, Pine Grove; 
Mrs. Dohner, Mrs. Harnish and Mrs. 
Engle, Palmyra; Mrs. Deisher, Jones- 
town; Mrs. Showers, Mountville; Mrs. 
Cassedy, Budd Lake, N. J.; Mrs. Britton, 
Hershey; Mrs. Witmer, Hummelstown; 
Mrs. Bishop, Oberlin; Mrs. McAdams, 
Mrs. Earnest and Lydia Wessner, Leba- 
non; Mrs. Blubaugh and Mrs. Hesson, 
Baltimore, Md.; Mrs. Ford, Trenton, N, 
J.; Mrs. Wolfskeil, Elizabeth, N. J.; and 
Mrs. Wagner, Mrs. Nye, Mrs. Saylor, 
Mrs. Gruber, Mrs. Gingrich, Mrs. Lynch, 
Mrs. Stonecipher, Mrs. Struble, Mrs. 
Reynolds, Mrs. Richie, Miss Myers, Mrs. 
Shenk, Mrs. Paul Wagner, and Mrs. 
Wallace, Annville. 





THEME'S ONE BEST TIME 
To Telephone Home! 

You'll agree, once you've tried it, that half 
past eight is the time to telephone home. 

At half past eight the day's rush is over. 
Your time is free for a leisurely telephone 
chat. 

At half past eight the same is true at home. 
It's the best time to catch the family all to- 
gether. 

At half past eight (and this is most im- 
portant) low Nigh? Rates go into effect on 
Station to Station calls. You can then save 
as much as 40% on your call. For example: 
If your home is 100 miles away, a three-min- 
ute connection will cost only 35 cents! 




of the I 



TO TAKE ADVANTAGE 
OVV i\14»HT KATES... 



Call after 8:30 P.M., and be sure to make 

a St;it ion to Station call. 

That means, ask the Operator for your 
home telephone, but not for any specific 

person. 

If you've fixed a date in advance, the family 
will be sure to be there. 

Charges may be reversed. 
T BE BELL TELEPHONE COMPANY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Ursinus Beats 

At Collegeville 

WIN HANDILY, 45 TO 33 



Rust, Barthold, And Smith Put 
Up Stellar Game In Stir- 
ring Struggle 



"Horse" Chase's Ursinus Bears clawed 
Lebanon Valley into submission by a 
45-33 score at Collegeville last week, en- 
abling Ursinus to close their season with 
an Eastern Pennsylvania Collegiate bas- 
ketball league triumph. The win marked 
the fourth triumph in a somewhat disas- 
trous court season for the Bears. 

Annville's Flying Dutchmen trailed 
throughout the contest. The homesters 
rolled up a 23-15 lead at halftime and 
further outscored Coach "Hooks" My- 
lin's passers 22-18 after intermission. 

Lebanon Valley was unable to siop the 
scoring of Johnson, Summers, Green- 
wait, and Calvert, and the Bears avenged 
a close 34-32 set-back suffered at the 
hands of Lebanon Valley here earlv in 
February. 

For Lebanon Valley, Charlie Rust. 
Stewart "Butch" Barthold and Bill 
Smith scored 31 of their team's 33 points. 
Patrizio contributed a foul toss as did 
Capt. Max Light for the Valley's other 
brace of counters. 

The defeat was the sixth of the sea- 
son suffered by Lebanon Valley in the 
college circuit. 

Lineups : 

Lebanon Valley 

G. F. Pts. 
Barthold, f 4 3 jj 

Rust ' f ■ 5 3 13 

Miller, c 

Light, g o 1 1 

Smith, g 3 J 7 

Williams, g ' 

Rose, c 

Patrizio, f 11 

Sponaugle, c 

Arndt, f 

Totals 12 9 33 

Ursinus 

G. F. Pts. 

Breisch, f 2 2 

Greenwalt, f 3 1 J 

Johnson, c 4 5 13 

Sommers, g 4 2 10 

P "ce, g 

Covert, g 

Calvert, g 3 \ 7 

Gaumer, f \ \ 3 

Smith, g 1 1 3 

Davidson, f 

Heck, g 



Totals 

Referee— Barfoot. 



.16 13 45 



Collegiate Matmen 
Tie John Hopkins 

COME UP FROM BEHIND 



Illness in Wrestling Squad 
Causes Coach to Use 
Substitutes 



The Collegians blazed their way into 
glory last Saturday night when they 
valiantly battled a strong Johns Hop- 
kins wrestling squad to an 18-18 tie on 
the Y.M.C.A. mat in Baltimore. Not vic- 
torious thus far this season, the local 
boys entered the meet a decided under- 
dog, but a grim determination with the 
score 18-3 against them and but three 
matches to go, coupled with the irrepres- 
sible desire to show their ability brought 
about a spectacular rally and the prided 
deadlock with the Blue Jays. 



How They Stand 


EAST PENN COLLEGE LEAGUE 




(Final 






W. 


L. Pet. 


Gettysburg 


11 


1 .917 


F. and M. 


8 


4 .667 


Muhlenberg 


7 


5 .583 


Lebanon Valley .... 6 


6 .500 


Albright 


5 


7 .417 


Ursinus 


3 


9 .250 


Drexel 


2 


10 .167 



Despite the fact that a blinding snow- 
storm kept the wrestlers in the road for 
seven hours and prevented them from ar- 
riving in Baltimore until an hour before 
the meet, the Collegians paled into in- 
significance their record of the past andj 
gave evidence of even greater perfor- 
mances in the future. Because of illness 
and injuries in the 145 lb. and 175 lb. 
classes, the Annville grapplers were 
forced to borrow men from other teams, 
these being Myers and Kimmel from the 
York and Harrisburg Y. M. C. A. squads 
respectively. Both of these men put on 
a splendid performance, Myers winning 
his match by a decided time advantage, 
while Kimmel had little difficulty pinning 
his man in six minutes and forty- five 
seconds. 

The meet was well attended by a large 
number of rooters for the local grunters, 
and the boys gave them many causes for 
exuberant outbursts. Every match lost 
by the Collegians was decidedly close, 
and the outcome could have just as easily 
been in their favor instead of going to 
the Baltimorians. 

In the 118 lb. class "Ike" Buzzell un- 
doubtedly put up one of the best scraps 
of the year before succumbing to Gel- 
ber. "Ike" put everything he had into 
this meet because he was wrestling 
against his former alma mater and before 
a home-town audience, but he was final- 
ly forced to drop his shoulders in 6 min- 
utes and 10 seconds. In the 126 lb. class, 
Beaver and Miller fought one of the 
full-time matches of the evening. Neither 
man was able to pin the other, but Buster 
was forced to concede a time advantage 
of 4 minutes 54 seconds to his opponent. 
Fridy, wrestling; Capt. Hartman of the 
Blue Jay squad in the 135 lb. class, was 
pinned in five minutes 35 seconds, but 
not before he had battled on almost even 
terms with his more experienced rival. 
The first local victory came, however, 
when Myers easily whipped Stolberg in 
the 145 lb. class. Although Myers is 
regularly a 135 lb. man for the York 
squad, he was much too powerful and 
experienced for his rival who weakened 
quickly and ceded a five-minute time ad- 
vantage. The score at this point was 
13-3 in favor of the Hopkins squad. 

In the 155 lb. class, "Russ" Jenkins 
battled on even terms with McDaniels, 
until an unfortunate position put Russ in 
a pinning hold. However, on several 
instances. Russ had his man with effec- 
tive holds and the match was proceed- 
ing at a fast clip when the local repre- 
sentative made the unlucky slip. Coach 
Thompson, wrestling in the 165 lb. class, 
won his encounter by forfeit. In the 175, 
John Kimmel met little opposition in 
Davies, and nearly pinned the Blue Jay 
in less than one minute. Davies, how- 
ever, struggled free, but to little avail 
against his more aggressive opponent 
who easily held him in check and later 
pinned him in 6 minutes, 45 seconds. The 
final match of the evening between the 
local "King Kong" and Bourne of Hop- 
kins in the unlimited class was easily 
captured by the Collegian in 1 minute, 
24 seconds. Despite the fact that "Kong" 
was handicapped by a broken bone in 
his foot, he nevertheless continued his 
successful record of finishing his man in 
short order. 



L.V.C. Girls Win Over 
Albright Sextette 

The Lebanon Valley girls' basketball 
team defeated the strong Albright sex- 
tette 35 to 27 Saturday afternoon in the 
feature event of the mother's week-end 
program. 

Misses Krebs and Gemmill were in 
rare form Saturday, caging 22 and 13 
points respectively while their mates, 
Orth, Chamberlain, C. and I. Weirick 
and March, .figured prominently in the 
defensive work. 

Lineups: 

Albright 

G. F. Pts. 

Whittman, f 4 1 9 

Biglinger, f 

Henry, f 8 2 18 

Gofroth, c 

Hicks, c 

Sprinkle, c 

Slater, g 

Turner, g 

Totals 12 3 27 

Lebanon Valley 

G. F. Pts. 

Krebs, f 10 2 22 

Gemmill, f 6 1 13 

Orth, c 

Chamberlain, c 

C. Weirick, g 

I. Weirick, g 

March, g 

Totals 16 3 35 

Referee— Moyer, Harrisburg. 



VARSITY AND FROSH 

WIN FROM ALBRIGHT 



(Continued from Page One) 



men 45-28. Snell at guard with 1 8 points 
and Billett at center with 12 points were 
the Valley Frosh stars. 
Lineups: 

Lebanon Valley 

G. F. Pts. 

Barthold, f 2 1 5 

Rust, f 5 3 13 

Miller, c 2 4 8 

Rose, c 

Light, g 

Smith, g 5 1 11 

Williams, g 

Totals 14 9 37 

Albright 

G. F. Pts. 

De Franco, f 4 8 

Shipe, f, c 3 2 8 

Hino, f 

Ross, c 2 3 7 

Woods, g 

Oslislo, g 4 8 

Totals 13 5 31 

Referee— Borger, Lancaster. 

Albright Frosh 

G. F. Pts. 

Kehler, f 2 1 5 

Becker, f 1 2 

Morris, f 2 4 

Riffler, c 3 6 

Garnet, g 1 1 

Ettle, g 1 1 

Aberzut, g 

McClintock, g 3 3 9 

Totals 11 6 28 

L. V. Frosh 

G. F. Pts. 

Kinney, f 3 3 9 

Crook, f, c 2 4 

Billett, c 4 4 12 

Snell, g 9 18 

Speg, g 2 2 

Holtzman, g 

Loose, g 



Totals U 

Referee— Moyer, Cleona. 



45 



1 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 16, 1934 



ALUMNI GYM 

IS SCENE OF 
REDED I CATION 



The re-dedication of the alumni gym- 
nasium after weeks of painting and var- 
nishing was appropriately celebrated on 
the evening of March 9th by a dance 
sponsored by the college conservatory 
students. Each guest had to present his 
musical ticket before entering the deco- 
rated ballroom (?), hung with musical 
notes, bass clefs, scales, and streamers. 

The dance floor was crowded to its 
very edges— seniors, juniors, sophs, and 
even frosh flocked to the big event. The 
orchestra— an eleven piece group of ex- 
cellent musicians led by Jack Schuler 
with Frank Huber tickling* the ivories 
and breaking the pedal— carried away 
the crowd to its melodious strains. 

A novel and enjoyable floor show was 
presented at about 10 o'clock when 
"Conserv" talent put on their numbers 
in grand and glorious style. Master of 
ceremonies, Bob Heath, introduced the' 
various participants. Matilda Bonanni, 
Myerstown's Mae West, sang in her 
usual vivacious and "come-hither" fash- 
ion "You're In My Heart" and still a 
step further in her amorous enunciations 
"Everything I Have Is Yours." Bill 
Black in regular Jan Garber style trum- 
peted his way through "Stardust," Schu- 
ler and Sausser gave their interpretation 
of "Goofus," during which their violins 
seemed to swing and sway to the lilt of 
the music. Charlotte Stabley, in mellow 
tones, sang "Temptation" and "Sweet 
Sue." The orchestra, starring Dale Roth 
as the vocalist, interpreted the "Last 
Round-up." The vocal trio, Sausser, 
Schuler and Roth, sang several popular 
selections, and as a final number Bryan 
and the orchestra joined in with "Smoke 
Rings." 

Not only was this affair a success 
financially, but from all angles and view- 
points it is another feather in the cap of 
the L. V. "Conserv" students and pro- 
fessors. 



STRING QUARTET AND 

SOLOISTS TO APPEAR 



In the student recital which will be 
held on Tuesday, March 20, in Engle 
Hall, the following people will partici- 
pate: The string quartet, including Jane 
Goodyear, Oleta Dietrich, Martha Elser, 
and Russell Hatz, will play. There will 
be piano solos by Alice Richie, Oleta 
Dietrich and Hugh Strickler. Charlotte 
Stabley and Catherine Heckman will 
sing. Lavinia Cassedy will play an or- 
gan solo, and Russell Hatz will play vio- 
lin. 



SOPHOMORES ASSUME 

CLASS LEAGUE LEAD 



(Continued from Page One) 

displayed fancy shooting and passing at- 
tacks with the Juniors holding a slight 
advantage in this respect. However, the 
Juniors soon began to click evenly and 
were bewildering the upper-classmen 
with their equally as effecciv? aggres- 
siveness in football as well as baskctoall 
tactics. 
Lineups: 

Sophomores 

G. F. Pts. 

Stephans, f 7 1 15 

Frank, f 6 1 13 

Sponaugle, c 3 2 8 

Rader, g 4 1 9 

Hershey, g 

Gilfillan, g 

Totals 20 5 45 

Juniors 

G. F. Pts. 

Arndt. f 4 8 

Kanoff, f 6 2 14 

Sincavage, c 4 

Whiting, g 

Mentzer, g 2 1 5 

Totals 16 4 36 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



Thursday, March 15— 

Little Symphony practice at 3:30 
P. M. Life Work Recruit meeting at 
6:45 P. M. Debate with Westmin- 
ster in Philo hall at 8:00 P. M. G. B. 
Glee Club will sing over WHP. Har- 
risburg, at 8:15. 
Friday, March 16— 

Glee Club concert at Cornwall. 
Meeting of Clio. 
Sunday, March 18— 

"Y. W." and "Y. M." meetings at 
5:45 P. M. 
Monday, March 19— 

College orchestra practice at 3:30 
P. M. Band practice at 7:00 P. M. 
Tuesday, March 20— 

Girls' band practice at 7:00 P. M. 
Girls' debate with Ursinus at Col- 
legeville. Frosh vs. Sophomores in 
the college gym. 

Student recital in Engle Hall, 
benefit. 

Wednesday, March 21 — 

Band practice at 7:00 P. M. De- 
bate with Gettysburg at Gettysburg. 
Juniors vs. Seniors in the college 
gym. "As Husbands Go," Delphian 
benefit. 

Thursday, March 22 — 

"As Husbands Go", Delphian bene- 
fit. . 

Friday, March 23— 

Kalo-Delphian play, "Hayfever." 



CO-ED CATNIP 



Last week's "Baby Boomerang" had a 
weak imagination when it said "Imagine 
the campus cats being so completely 
snowed under that no new dirt could be 
spread." But it is difficult to find news 
around here. Maybe it's because L. V. 
has no cats or maybe it's because the 
campus isn't active enough. At any rate, 
we're hoping, for the good of Lebanon 
Valley, that it's the first. If it were the 
second,— well, that's a sign that we're 
dull. Better open your eyes, you social 
lions. 



CLIO ENTERTAINED 

BY JUNIOR MEMBERS 



Here's a better teaser for the imagina- 
tion. Can you feature a hungry frosh 
having the presence of mind to look 
around him at the table and see that 
everyone else will get a slice of butter 
before he takes too large a slice himself? 

Or can you imagine eevryone at the 
table waiting until everyone else has 
been served before eating? 

Or can you imagine one organization 
meeting in "room 18 of the Ad building 
at one o'clock" without another organi- 
zation's doing the same thing? 

Or can you imagine every one at the 
the college dining hall without having 
hash— or carrots? 

Or can you imagine some of our 
campus intellect arriving on time for an 
eight o'clock class? 

Or can you imagine lunch hour in the 
men's day student rooms without the 
usual carousal? (It must be a big event). 

Or can you imagine North Hall with- 
out lights after five o'clock? 

Or can you imagine a change in the 
usual trend of hymns in chapel? (We 
ought to know some of these hymns by 
heart) . 

We miss our college band. Why must 
they stop playing for us on Friday in 
chapel simply because the football sea- 
son is over? We need the same pep for 
classes that we need for a football game, 
and I'm willing to bet that the professors 
would be only too glad to see us skip 
joyfully into their 9:15 classes. Who'll 
yell with me for more of the band? 



[ Continued from Page One) 



gave one of their famous inspired dances. 
Amid great applause the pair departed. 

Probably the most momentous time of 
the evening was at the introduction of 
Princess Bust-off, who, in an effort to 
raise funds to return to her native land, 
came there Friday. Princess Bust-off is 
a great portrayer of emotions. Accom- 
panied by Margaret Early, who played 
a familiar funeral march, the princess 
represented grief. Then came intense joy 
with "We won't 'get home until morn- 
ing." Next was surprise, followed by 
wistfulness. Fear was her greatest tri- 
umph when the big bad wolf was just 
around the corner. Lastly, we saw the 
princess as her own natural self. The 
free-will offering plate at the door was 
loaded by Clio members. Goodbye, 
Princess Bust-off— Kotty, McAdam. Clio 
will be at the dock to see you off. 

Finally, the Sawed-off Twins again 
appeared and did a highly original vo- 
calizing number. Hmm! Literary Pro- 
gram! Here's to mere and more of such 
for Clio! 

A warning has come for some of the 
society members to guard their actions. 
There's a highly observant person spy- 
ing around the corner and she's the edi- 
tor of the "Olive Branch," Maxine 
Earley. 

With the report of the critic, Marion 
Leisey, the evening was ended. Louise 
Gillan will be program chairman next 
time when the Sophomores will have 
charge. Clio was very glad to welcome 
Miss Myers to the meeting Friday. An 
invitation will be extended to all the fac- 
ulty members to attend at various times. 



PING PONG TOURNEY 

PROGRESSING NICELY 



(Continued from Page One] 



it the honor of meeting this wizard in a 
match at the close of the tournament. 
However, anything can happen. 

The other outstanding players in the 
tournament are Ax, C. Mentzer, Leh- 
man, Walborn, Hitz and Fishburn. All 
of these entries have amassed commend- 
able scores and it is difficult to decide 
which of them will capture the coveted 
positions in the tournament. The last 
two mentioned opposed one another in 
a match played on Wednesday with the 
latter emerging the winner by a 3 to 2 
score. 

The unexpected is liable to happen 
and some dark horse entry is apt to 
spring a surprise by defeating one of the 
favorites. This can best be illustrated by 
Cullather's 3 to 2 victory over C. Ment- 
zer. Cully is quite a pool artist and hails 
from Minersville which also boasts of 
"Frankie Frisch" Boran, a reliable tend- 
er of the keystone sack for the Lebanon 
Valley College ^iine. 



SANDWICHES SODAS 

EAT AT ROEMIG'S 

DELICIOUS HOME-MADE 
ICE CREAM 



FLOWERS 

FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

BERNSTEIN'S 

LEBANON, PENNA. 



Doutr 



Always Reliable 5 p 



Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 




DELPHIAN GIRLS 
OFFER BENEFIT 



At a meeting held on March 9, Del- 
phian decided to hold a benefit show at 
the Astor theatre. "As Husbands Go", 
starring Warner Baxter, was selected as 
the move. This show proved its success 
by having had a long run in New York 
and Philadelphia. Last week it played in 
Hershey. The nights chosen for the per- 
formance were March 21 and 22. Tick- 
ets may be obtained from any Delphian. 

This Friday night Clio and Delphian 
will hold a joint session in Clio Hall. A 
joint program is being worked out by 
both the judiciary committees. 



"Quittie" Managers 
Appointed By Hershey 



Paul Hershey, business manager of 
the 1936 "Quittie," today announced 
the selection of the business staff 
which will aid him in producing the 
annual. 

Louise Shearer and William Kirk- 
patrick have been selected to fill the 
responsible posts of advertising man- 
agers. Both Miss Shearer and Mr. 
Kirkpatrick have had practical experi- 
ence in the business administration de- 
partment and are well qualified to 
handle this responsible phase of the 
Quittie's production. For the impor- 
tant positions of circulation mana- 
gers, Mr. Hershey has selected Paul 
Kuhlman and William Prescott. 

With these capable aides the finan- 
cial success of the 1936 "Quittie" is 
assured. 



J. E. GIPPLE 
Fire Insurance and Real Estate 

1251 Market Street 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



KREAMER BROS. 



EASY ELECTRIC WASHERS 
GAS STOVES AND RANGES 
RUGS AND LINOLEUMS 
PICTURE FRAMING 



Furniture - - Undertaking 



Phone 14 4 ANNVILLE, PA. 



AFTER MARCH 1 5TH 

BOLLMAN'S 

Book and Stationery 
Store 

WILL BE AT 

628 Cumberland St. 
Lebanon 

COME AND SEE US 



ASYCR 



ANNVILLE, 



PENNA. 



FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 
I AM SUZANNE 

WITH 

LILLIAN HARVEY 
GENE RAYMOND 
LESLIE BANKS 



MONDAY & TUESDAY 
JOHN WAYNE 
IN 

HAUNTED GOLD 



WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY 
AS HUSBANDS GO 

WITH 

WARNER BAXTER 



BEST SHORT ATTRACTIONS 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



A&PTEA, 

C. H. SHEARER, Mgr. 



GRIMM'S BOOK STORE 

SPECIAL 
CROWN SET 
CLIONIAN PINS—SI 2. OO 



FOR QUALITY 

Baked Products 

PATRONIZE 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



SEE OUR LINE OF 
MEN S SPORT AND DRESS 
SHOES FOR EASTER 

JOHN HIRSCH DEPT. STORE 
ANNVILLE PENNA. 



D. L. Say lor & Son* 
CONTRACTORS 

LUMBER and COAL 
Annville, Pennsylvania 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. B ASHORE 



LEBANON. PENNSYLVANIA 



"COME AND GET A COKE" 
FOR A BITE or a BANQUET 



TRY.. 



THE PENNWAY ^ 




Will It Be "Chief-ess?' 
Go to the Trial' 



Mte €o%ientit 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Long Live the Queen! 
'Hayfever' Tonight 



VOL. X 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1934 



No. 26 



Earnest Appointed 
Editor-in-Chief of 
La Vie Collegienne 

BAUS AND SHEAFFER AID 

New Staff Will Be Announced 
In Forthcoming Issue 
Of Weekly 



The destinies of La Vie Collegienne 
for the year 1934-35 will lie in the hands 
of Helen Earnest, of Lebanon, Pa., who 
recently was appointed editor-in-chief of 
the student publication. Other members 
of the staff whose appointments were ap- 
proved by the faculty are Richard Baus, 
who as managing editor will supervise 
the mechanical department, and Kenneth 
Sheaffer, who will serve as head of the 
business staff. 

Miss Earnest has functioned efficiently 
for two years as a reporter on the La 
Vie staff, and her appointment to this re- 
sponsible position indicates the confi- 
dence the faculty has in her ability to 
manage and her capacity for hard work. 
For the last year she has been a member 
of the 1935 Quittapahilla staff and has 
shown her literary and journalistic abil- 
ity in many other ways. 

The selection of Richard Baus for the 
position of managing editor indicates the 
high regard in which his journalistic abil- 
ity is held. Mis vviJe experience on La 
Vie gives him a good background for the 
direction of lay-out, make-up, etc., work 
in which he has excelled during his first 
year on the staff. 

Kenneth Sheaffer has been assistant 
business manager of the paper for this 
last year, and his training under the pre- 
wnt incumbent, Jack Todd, will stand 
him in good stead. The contacts he has 
made will be a great asset curing his next 
year's work. 

The remainder of the staif wil! be an- 
nounced by the new edito: and business 
manager in the next edition of La Vie, 
which will appear on April 12. 



Progress Made On 
1934 "Quittie"; May 
Day Sale Expected 



T he staff of the 1935 Quittapahilla 
re Ports steady progress on what they 
claim will be the best year book in the 
history of Lebanon Valley College. All 
ln dividual and group write-ups have al- 
re ady been sent to the publishers, and 
j 1 ' 1 other material such as pictures, ath- 
e K and social activities, and miscella/ 
ne °us material is rapidly being collected. 
Under the direction of their editor, 
enr y Palatini, a zealous staff of work- 
ers is busy putting the finishing touches 
, a book that promises many new and 
2"9inal ideas over former publications. 
ne business staff, also, under Charles 



^ UC k thus far been highly success- 
n Procuring a large number of ads, 



ful 
and 



fi ln steering the book along a clear 
nar >cial course. 

n e steady progress continues, there 
a 9reat likelihood that the "Quitties" 



^_ re ady for distribution on or about 
dent' However, the staff is confi- 

appe that regardless of when the book 

khecf 1 * ^ e stuc ' ents wl 'l POs ses s a cher- 
d ays and memorable token of happy 
i ng Ich they, the staff, are endeavor- 
° Portray i n their 1935 edition. 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



Thursday, March 22— 

Little Symphony practice at 3:30 
P. M. Life Work Recruit meeting at 
6:45 P. M. 
Friday, March 23— 

Kalo-Delphian present "Hay Fe- 
ver." 

Saturday, March 24— 

Kalo dinner dance at the Penn- 
Harris hotel at 7:30 P. M. 
Sunday, March 25— 

"Y. W." and "Y. M." vesper ser- 
vices at 5:45 P. M. 
Monday, March 26— 

Debate with Millersville State 
Teachers College, away. College or- 
chestra parctice at 3:30 P. M. Band 
practice at 7:00 P. M. 
Tuesday, March 27— 

Girls' band practice at 7:00 P. M. 
Wednesday, March 28— 

An official "leave of absence" to 
all college students beginning at 4:00 
P. M., for one week. 



Three Debate Wins 
During Past Week 



SQUAD AGAIN VICTORIOUS 



Gettysburg and Westminster 
Bow to Lebanon Valley 
Men and Women 



Lebanon Valley's debaters regained 
their winning stride the past week by 
conguering their opponents in three sepa- 
rate debates. The first debate featured 
the men's affirmative of Lebanon Valley 
and the men's negative of Gettysburg. 
The local team eked out a 2-1 decision 
over their rivals in this debate, held in 
Philo Hall last Wednesday night. Thurs- 
day night again in Philo Hall the men's 
negative of Lebanon Valley met and de- 
feated the men's affirmative of Westmin- 
ster College by a close 2-1 decision. Dur- 
ing the same hour the girls' teams of the 
same two schools were holding a debate 
in Delphian Hall, where Lebanon Valley 
gained a 3-0 decision in its favor. 

Gettysburg stopped in Annville on the 
last day of a whole week's tour in which 
time they competed in twelve debates. 
During their trip of eastern Pennsylvania 
they met teams from Franklin and Mar- 
shall, Drexel, Swarthmore, Temple, Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, Ursinus, Muhl- 
enburg, Albright, Moravian and two 
others before ending their schedule by 
debating Lebanon Valley. Crowding all 
these debates into one week meant that 
the members of their team would become 
slightly stale on the subject, which was 
exactly the case. And so the argument 
put up by Harold Hollingsworth, Mark 
Hostetter and Robert Etter was suffi- 
ciently strong enough to gain a 2-1 de- 
cision of the judges. The vanguished 
Gettysburg debaters were Morris Smeal, 
Wayne Woods and Carl Chronister. 
This debate was held on the traditional 
style, that is, a three-man team, and was 
judged by Mr. James Kinney, assistant 
manager, Bethlehem Steel Co., Lebanon, 
Pa.; Prof. R. E. Hartz, principal of Pal- 
myra High School, Palmyra, Pa.; and 
Mr. H. D. Sarge, an insurance salesman 
of Lebanon, Pa. The chairman of the 
debate was Clyde Mentzer, manager of 
the men's debating sguad. 

The men's and women's teams of 
Westminster College, located at New 
(Continued on Page 4; Column 3) 



Delphian-Kalo Play 
Will Appear Tonight 

COWARDS' "HAY FEVER" 



Subtle "Humors" of Introverts 
Not Readily Understandable 
To Audience 



When Delphian and Kalo give Noel 
Coward's "Hay Fever" tonight, if there 
filled with plot and laughs they will 
filled with pjlot and laughs they will 
either be disappointed or surprised. For 
it is rumored the play must be in mind 
a week before a few of the humors are 
revealed. Perhaps because this produc- 
tion can be said to be truly different from 
other types of plays presented at L. V., 
it will be enough to demand the usual in- 
terest evidenced at anniversary drama- 
tizations. 

The members of the family, who are 
entertaining a pugilist, and an ambassa- 
dor, are all introverts. It is impossible 
for them to see beyond their outstretched 
arms. The world is theirs in a house. 
Their visitors are hardly remembered at 
times, or it may be said they are allowed 
to shift for themselves and apparently be- 
come members of the family. 

Members of the family were once 
actresses and actors. They never fail to 
remember this life in their contact with 
certain other characters. With constant 
theatrical behavior an end is obtained by 
the mother. Yet, since love problems 
occur so promptly and frequently, plot 
is so odd, and the whole picture so quick, 
nothing definite may be said until the 
entire problem is viewed and considered. 

It shall be interesting to observe how 
the characters represented appear in 
these situations. It is never the idea to 
select a play that can be covered with- 
out extensive work and difficulty. How- 
ever, the action which occurs in this 
drama is somewhat new and unusual 
for those who are taking the parts. 
Since it has required possibly extraordin- 
ary effort, an excellent piece of work 
is to be expected. 

This play represents the anniversary 
production of Kalozetean, but, this year, 
is in co-operation with Delphian. Dr. 
Struble is coaching. Mr. Phillips is 
spending a great deal of time in offering 
valuable suggestions and preparing the 
property, all of which is greatly appre- 
ciated. 



Y Cabinet Guests 

Of Mrs. Wallace 



Mrs. Wallace entertained the new- 
ly-elected Y. W. C. A. cabinet, the 
retiring cabinet and the freshman cab- 
inet at her home Monday evening, 
March 19. After enjoying a delight- 
ful dinner served in buffet style, the 
guests played games. The list of 
guests included: Mrs. Green, Mrs. 
Struble, Miss Myers, Lena Cockshott, 
Louise Gillan, Margaret Weaver, Iva 
Claire Weirick, Louise Shearer, Alma 
Cline, Rebecca Adams, Frances Kei- 
ser, Catherine Wagner, Grace Nau- 
gle, Martha Faust, Kathryn Mowrey, 
Charlotte Weirick, Margaret Longe- 
necker, Margaret Kohler, Dorothy 
Jackson, Miriam Book, Mildred Nye, 
Rae Anna Reber, Irma Kieffer, Gayle 
Mountz, Sara Meckley, Lois Harbold, 
Selma Grim, Anna Orth and Maxine 
Earley. 



MINNA WOLFSKEIL IS 
MA Y QUEEN FOR 1934 

GEMMILL IS ELECTED MAID OF HONOR 



Mary Gossard, Helen Lane, Margaret Longenecker, Mildred 
Nye, Margaret Kohler, and Margaret Early Receive 
Distinction of Being Chosen in Festival Queen's Court 



T" Ceremony Is 
Very Impressive 



SERVICE IS TRADITIONAL 



The expected has come to pass! May Day elections have finally 
taken place. The great event was held in Chapel Wednesday morn- 
ing, March 24. The weather had put the students into the correct 
atmosphere. Louise Gillan announced the affair, imploring the voters 
to vote fairly and without bias. Minna WolfsKeil, of Elizabeth, New 
Jersey, won the contest and automatically became Queen of the May. 
Gem Gemmill, of Glen Rock, Pa., was second, winning the title of 
Maid of Honor. The next six comprise the Court, consisting of Mary 
Gossard, Helen Lane, Margaret Longenecker, Margaret Kohler, 
Margaret Early, and Mildred Nye. 

Miss WolfsKeil has been active in ex- 
**V* f^£H»£kinrkn\7 Tc tra-curricular activities since she first 

came to this campus. Last Spring she 
was elected to the position of opening 
president for Delphian Literary Society, 
and filled her position very well. For 
the past two years she has been manager 
of the girls' debating team, for which 
she works very enthusiastically. Minna 
is worthy of her honor as May Queen. 
During her life on this campus she has 
proven herself a leader scholastically and 
socially. She is extremely capable and 
dependable. Her work is always garn- 
ished with her own individuality, charm, 
and poise. 

The honor of Maid of Honor has fallen 
to one of the most popular coeds on this 
campus. Miss Gemmill has always been 
one of the live wires on our campus. Her 
manner is charming and especially suit- 
ed to her position in the May Court. 

The Court, which is supposed to repre- 
sent the six most beautiful girls in the 
Senior class, has fulfilled its duty ex- 
tremely well this Spring. Everyone of 
the girls deserves her position as a repre- 
sentative of the beauty of the upper 



Cockshott and Mentzer, With 
New Cabinets, Now Are 
In Office 



The cabinets of the Christian associa- 
tions, newly elected, were installed in a 
chapel service Thursday morning. The 
traditional order of service was used. 
The young ladies of the new cabinet, all 
in white, appeared on the stage with the 
retiring president and the faculty advi- 
sors. The young men were similarly ac- 
companied by their retiring president and 
faculty advisors. 

Miss Dorothy Ely played an organ 
prelude to the service. The two retiring 
presidents then conducted the devotions, 
Miss Mowrey reading the scripture les- 
son and Mr. Ranck leading in a devo- 
tional prayer. From back-stage, Miss 
Helen Summy sang the beautiful solo, 
"My Task." 

The installation proper followed. Mr. 
Warren Mentzer accepted the challenge 
of office which was given by Mr. Ranck 
which was symbolized by the transfer of 
the traditional candle from retiring to 
newly-elected president. Similarly, Miss 
Lena Cockshott accepted Miss Mowrey's 
challenge. Dr. Lynch, president of the 
college, then administered the oath of of- 
fice to the Y. M. and Y. W. presidents 
and their cabinets in turn. 

As a conclusion to the impressive ser- 
vice, Mr. Mentzer led in a prayer of 
consecration and the stirring hymn "Fol- 
low the Gleam" was sung in unison. 

Mr. Mentzer announces the following 
as his cabinet members for the following 
year: Samuel Harnish, vice-president; 
Theodore Loose, secretary; Robert Cas- 
sel, treasurer; Richard Walborn, Allen 
Steffy, Kenneth Sheaffer, Harold Bea- 
mesderfer, Kenneth Eastland, Elwood 
Needy, Miller Schmuck, Homer Kendall. 

The cabinet of the Y. W. C. A. which 
Miss Cockshott will have as her official 
organization consists of the following: 
Louise Gillan, vice-president; Alma Kline, 
recording secretary; Iva Claire Weirick, 
corresponding secretary; Louise Shearer, 
treasurer; Margaret Weaver, Catherine 
Wagner, Frances Keiser, Grace Naugle, 
Martha Faust, Rebecca Adams. 



I. F. Boughter, L.V.C. 
Alumnus, Killed in 
Automobile Accident 



Dr. I. F. Boughter, '19, one of the most 
brilliant and successful of the younger 
graduates of Lebanon Valley College, 
died March 16 as the result of injuries 
received when struck by a truck on the 
campus of Fairmont State Teachers Col- 
lege, Fairmont, W. Va. The accident 
occurred as he was crossing a drive on 
the campus, while completing arrange- 
ments for a debating tournament of thir- 
teen colleges, conducted on the campus 
of the state teachers college. He was 
rendered unconscious and died an hour 
later without regaining consciousness. 

Funeral services were conducted at the 
state teachers college and in the United 
Brethren church at Pine Grove, Pennsyl- 
vania. The high esteem in which he was 
held by his associates was evidenced by 
the fact that forty members of the faculty 
and student body attended the funeral at 
Pine Grove. 

After graduation from Lebanon Val- 
ley, Dr. Boughter served for two years 
as principal of the township schools at 
Corydon, Pennsylvania. From 1922-1925 
(Continued on Pae 3;; Column 3) 



1 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1934 



£a Viz Collegtenne 

ESTABLISHED 1925 



weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Edmund Umberger, '34 .. .Editor-in-Chief 
Kathryn Mowrey, '34 ... .Associate Editor 
Richard Schreiber, '34 .. Managing Editor 
Richard Baus. '37 Asst. Man. Editor 



REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Martha Kreider, '34 
Allan Ranck, '34 
Elizabeth Schaak, '34 
Helen Earnest, '35 
Sylvia Evelev, '36 

David Yake, '36 General Reporters 

Christine Gruber, '34 Conservatory 

DeWitt Essick, '34 

George Hiltner, "35 Athletics 

Catherine Wagner, '35 Alumni 

Clyde Mentzer, '34 Philokosmian 

Robert Cassel, '36 Kalozetean 

Jane Shellenberger, '36 Clionian 

Marietta Ossl, '35 Delphian 



BUSINESS STAFF 

Jack Todd, '34 Business Manager 

Kenneth Sheaffer, '35 .Asst. Bus. Manager 
Allen Buzzell, '34. . .Circulation Manager 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 

Single Copies 5 cents 

Subscription $1.00 per year 



Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter, under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 

FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1934 
ARBITRATE 



The recent dissolution of the Varsity 
"L" Club, following the tendering of its 
constitution to the president of the col- 
lege, causes the raising of a variety of 
opinions by both students and faculty. 

There is no doubt that the "L" club 
fulfills an important function in our school 
life, and many students other than the 
athlete members expressed regret at its 
sudden demise. It is quite probable that 
the varsity letter men's organization had 
just grievances, and it is just as prob- 
able that it was dilatory in several ways 
in conforming to certain school move- 
ments. To an impartial observer, it seems 
that the resignation of the constitution 
was a trifle premature, and that better 
ways could be found to settle the trouble. 

The reports that the constitution will 
be restored and that the "L" Club will 
resume its worthwhile activities are a 
source of hope. A club which has be- 
hind it the tradition of years and a ros- 
ter of illustrious names should not be al- 
lowed to expire without some protest 
and effort from those interested in its 
existence. 

So we hope that the athletes and the 
administration can come to an under- 
standing and that the result will be the 
survival of the Varsity "L" Club. 



SWAN SONG 



Every year, on the event of the last 
issue of La Vic Collegienne, it is the 
custom of the outgoing editor to trum- 
pet forth a last clear call, usually in the 
form of a recapitulation of the progress 
made by the paper during his term. 

We will be a little different this year. 
We thank all the students who have 
given us suggestions and encouragement 
during a period of hard financial sled- 
ding. We say a good word for those 
who have worked with us for a year 
and who have seen hopes glimmer and 
expected rewards vanish as they worked. 
We call attention to the changes we have 
made in format, typography, and policy, 
which we will not identify, but which 
the discerning must surely notice. 

And lastly, we bespeak for the new 
editor and the new staff the same spirit 
and helpful suggestions which aided us 
this year, and a diminution of the infre- 
quent thoughtless criticism which, in 
small measure, was our lot. 



FACULTY NOTES 



Mrs. Green spent the week-end in 
Baltimore where she visited her daugh- 
ter, Miss Yvonne Green, who is recover- 
ing from a serious illness. The La Vic 
is wishing Miss Green a speedy and 
complete return to health. 



Dr. Wagner entertained the 'Math ma- 
jors, at his home on College avenue Tues- 
day evening. Those students there \\e r ? 
Kathryn Mowrey, Charlotte Weirick, 
Verna Gnssinger, Anne Matula, Marga- 
ret Longenecker, Edmund Umberger, 
Wendell King and Allan Ranck. 



At a meeting of the high school prin- 
cipals of Dauphin County at Penbrook, 
Monday evening, March 19, Dr. Shenk 
addressed the group with "Local History" 
as his topic. 




BEYONP^ CftHPUS 



Very recently an almost unanimous 
verdict in favor of the Princess Yous- 
soupoff to the extent of £25,000 and costs 
was reached in the famous Metro-Gold- 
wyn-Mayer, Ltd.-Youssoupoff case. The 
film, it was alleged, gave an untrue and 
libelous picture of the character of the 
Princess Natasha. The company was 
restrained from showing the picture and 
as a result has now requested and re- 
ceived a stay of execution pending the 
result of an appeal. 

With this picture in mind, on? would 
expect the movie magnates to steer clear 
of historical pictures. But on the same 
page with the above item, we find a 
large advertisement for the world's pre- 
miere of the House of Rothschild starr- 
ing George Arliss. 



The famous New York Alimony Clt b 
has changed its constitution so as to ad- 
mit one woman member — Mrs. Rose Fox 
of the Bronx. 

The Alimony Club believes that the 
present alimony laws, far from protect- 
ing the American home, really tend to 
destroy it. The present laws are de- 
nounced as "archaic and preposterous" 
and in need of a reform on a national 
basis. 

After its first annual dinner, floods of 
congratulatory telegrams were received 
from alimony prisoners in the Brooklyn 
and New York county jails. 



At last something has been done about 
the Virgin Islands. These "poor-house" 
possessions are to receive a charter in 
the name of the Virgin Islands Com- 
pany with the assistance of $1,000,000 
granted by the PWA. It is planned to 
have the sugar and other industries de- 
veloped by a government owned and 
operated cooperative which would shar.' 
its profits with its workers. 

"The division of profits will be on a 
sliding scale based on the amount of 
labor put in or the amount of sugar 
sold," says the New York Times' cor- 
respondent. This of course will be in 
addition to regular payments for serv- 
ices or produce. 



A score or more negro students from 
Harvard University, Washington, D. C, 
created a mild disturbance in the capital 
when they attempted to rush the Con- 
gress restaurant in a vain effort to test 
the rule barring their race from service. 

It all began by the dismissal of a ne- 
gro waiter after serving one of his own 
race. So the group of students tried to 
enter the dining room and get service by 
force, but capital police weer notified and 
barred them from entering. It was set- 
tled by the members in the restaurant 
who pointed out the unwritten law 
against serving negroes, and the more 
unruly of the students were imprisoned. 



May Queen 




MINNA WOLFSKEIL 

Lebanon Valley Senior who recently 
ii'as elected Queen of the May. Miss 
WolfsKeil's iiome is in Elizabeth, N. J. 
She has been active during her four 
years at college. 



Discoveries at Ur of the Chaldees 
have made the art of ancient Greece 
modern. Believed to be the oldest stone 
sculpture in the ground and dating back 
to about 3200 B. C, the statue of a wom- 
an has been unearthed from a soldier's 
grave by the joint expedition of the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania Museum and the 
British Museum. 

Suggesting that "the figure perhaps 
lacks a full measure of beauty and re- 
finement," Dr. C. Leonard Woolley, field 
director, says in reporting the discovery 
that it is ten inches high, "squat and 
thickset, with broad shoulders and head 
disproportionably large." Evidently the 
ideal of feminine beauty has changed 
considerably in these few hundred cen- 
turies. 



A national storm of shame and indig- 
nation has blown up because of the es- 
cape of John Dillinger, "the country's 
worst outlaw since Jesse James." With 
a wooden pistol as his sole weapon, he 
together with a negro prisoner, made his 
e cape from prison after kidnapping the 
deputy sheriff and lockinq up thirty- 
three deputies, jail employees and priso- 
ners. 

In Dillinger's return to the state after 
being caught by the Arizona police to 
the disgust of onlookers, his arrival 
seemed more of the homecoming of a 
"local boy who made good" than the 
capture of a hardened and shameful 
criminal. 

The Chicago Tribune harshly states, 
"Dillinger has put an indelible stain upon 
the administration of criminal law in the 
'late. Explanation will not take it 

away." ■ 



An experiment is now going on at 
Temple University. A society girl has 
just originated Synketics, a new type of 
dancing. It is supposed to be the real 
dance of emotions, one step higher than 
our modern social dancing. According 
to its inventor, an irritated wife, instead 
of breaking out in reproaches, because 
her spouse is tardy, breaks out in a 
dance, thus giving vent to her rage with- 
out infuriating her husband. There are 
about a dozen co-eds studying this new- 
ly-instituted branch of athletics, evident- 
ly desirous of harmonious domesticity. 



NO LA VIE NEXT WEEK 



Because of the Easter vacation, 
there will be no issue of La Vie Col- 
legienne next week. The next edition 
will appear on Thursday, April 12, 
and will be the first product of the 
new staff. 




One of the well-known horse racing 
enthusiasts said he picked a pony on 
Monday that turned out to be a "Mud- 
der." When asked what he meant by a 
mudder he replied, "She loved mud so 
much she stayed in the back of all the 
other horses so that they could kick mud 
in her face." 

Another said he picked a horse that 
has that one beat. He said she was so 
bashful she wouldn't force herself to the 
front. 



And then a third said there's only one 
kind of horse he'd bet on and that's the 
horse whose life is just a whirl of plea- 
sure. When asked where you find those 
kind of horses he answered: "On a mer- 
ry-go-round." 



Essick (while practice-teaching his- 
tory)— "Who can tell me what the for- 
mer ruler of Russia was called?" 

Class (in unison) —"Tsar." 

Ess— "Correct; and what was his wife 
called?" 

Class — "Tsarina." 

Would-be Teacher — "Now who can 
tell what the Tsar's children were called?" 

There was a pause, and then a voice 
piped up: "Tsardines, of course!" 



Overheard in the dining hall — "Who 
invented the hole in the doughnut?" 
"Oh, some fresh-air fiend, I suppose!" 



ADMINISTRATION NOTES 



A schedule of President Lynch's ac 
tivities follows: 

March 27 — Will deliver the sermon 

at the Reformed Church in Annvill e 
March 28— Will preach at Lebanon 

Hebron United Brethren Church. 
March 29 — Will speak at the noon 

union Lenten service to be held in 
Zion Lutheran Church, Lebanon. 
March 30— Will talk at the Good 

Friday service in Salem United 
Brethren Church, Lebanon, to be held 
at 3 o'clock. 

Will attend a meeting of the Penn- 
sylvania Academy of Science in Al- 
bright College. , 

April 3 — Will address the young peo- 
ple's meeting in the Lancaster Cov- 
enant United Brethren Church. 



Clio and Delphian 

Hold Joint Session 



Bill — "Are you saving any money 
since you started your budget system?" 

Sill— "Sure. By the time we have bal- 
anced it up every evening it's too late 
to go anywhere." 

Prof— "This exam will be conducted 
on the honor system. Now please take 
seats three seats apart and in alternate i 
rows." 



A judge's little daughter, who had at- 
tended her father's court for the first 
time, explained everything to her mother. 

"Papa made a speech, and several 
other men made speeches to twelve men 
who sat all together, and then these 
twelve men were put in a dark room to 
be developed." 



On Friday night, March 16, 1934, the 
Clionian and Delphian Literary Societies 
held a joint sessions in Clio hall The 
hall was very comfortable and cozy with 
its card tables and lamps arranged for 
the convenience of the quests. On the 
piano a wise old owl sat and watched 
the whole program. Bridge and other 
games of cards were played. Miriam 
Book and Gem Gemmill took turns an- 
nouncing the program. The first number 
on rhe program of the evening was a 
piano solo, played by Ruth Goyne in 
her own lovely way. Then, after an- 
other rubber of bridge, "Tein" Gruber 
recited "Entertaining Sister's Beau", in 
her usual way. Bridge was or:ce more 
resumed, but soon refreshments were 
served by Miriam Book and committee, 
consisting of Lena Cockshott, Iva Claire 
Weirick, and Elizabeth Ca-i. Everyone 
enpoyed the refreshments, for who does- 
n't like pop-sicles, pretzels, and lolly 
pops? Bridge wa« discontinued rnd ev- 
eryone danced to the strains of Ruth 
Goyne's piano. Evtry one had a grand 
time and here's hoping for more of these 
joint sessions. 



Bob— "Your girl friend seems a garru- 
lous woman." 

Bill — "Garrulous? Why, if I suddenly 
went dumb it would take her a week to 
find it out." 



"Yessah, Ah's a great singah." 
"Wheah did you-all learn to sing?" 
"Ah graduated from a correspondence 
school." 

After a moment— "Say, you must lose 
lots of yo' mail." 



A farmer has plowed up a watch he 
lost ten years ago. The remarkable as- 
pect of the incident is that the watch is 
not running and keeping perfect rim?. 



The fellow who brags "I run things in 
my house," usually refers to the lawn 
mower, washing machine, vacuum cweep- 
er, baby carriage, and the errands. 



Visitor (to the butler who is showing 
him through the picture gallery ) —"That 
is a fine portrait! Is it an old master?" 

Butler— "No, that's the old missus." 



When the doctor arrived he found the 
patient, just another Scotchman, in tears. 

"Cheer up, my good man," he said, 
"you'll pull through." 

"Oh, it isn't that, doctor. I was think- 
ing of all the good money I spent for 
apples to keep you away." 





Theatres, shops, and the goings- 
on about town are just a few 
blocks away when you stop at 
Hotel Tudor. And it's in Tudor 
City, New York's smart residen- 
tial community. A new hotel — 
600 rooms — all with private bath. 

Single rooms $2; double $3- 
Special rates by the week. 

Two blocks east of Grand Central 

304 East 42nd St. 
I lUrray Hill 4-3900 

Fr«-d F. French Management Co., Io c * 



C; 
m< 
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vil 
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sltrj 



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LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1934 



PAGE THREE 



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SPORT SHOTS 

•Hooks" Mylin, Lebanon Valley 
c j 1) left this week to take up his new 
duties as head coach at Bucknell. Hooks 



DAD'S DAY TO BE 
HELD NEXT YEAR 



has 



a wealth of material to work with, 
nC j for the next two weeks will devote 
his time to spring football training. He 
.jj t hen return to L. V. C. for the base- 
ball season. 



Hooks took with him to Bucknell his 
ss istant this year at Lebanon Valley, 
Martin "Marty" Mc Andrews. If Hooks 
a nd Marty work together as they have 
done at Lebanon Valley, there will be 
n0 doubt that Bucknell will have a cham- 
pionship team next fall. 



Ouite a few baby members of the "L" 
Club appeared on the campus Tuesday 
morning with their newly-cut hair, etc. 
We hear they had spent a very interest- 
ing evening. We also liked Cully's 
speech in chapel. However, if the initia- 
tion was not a benefit to the initiates, 
from all appearances it was to the camp- 
us. 



Spring came yesterday and with it 
baseball. Quite a few of the early birds 
have been out throwing the old pill 
around the campus. Although practice 
will not start in earnest until Coach My- 
lin returns from Bucknell, there will be 
an opportunity for all' candidates to get 
into condition. 



Developments in the line of a new 
coach for L. V. C. are very slow at pre- 
sent. Applications are still coming to 
the office of the athletic association but 
it will probably be some time before a 
coach is chosen. We would like to see 
a coach at L. V. who understands the 
school, not a coach to make athletics a 
big time game, but a coach who will pro- 
duce a team not only to win games but a 
team of sports. We would like to see a 
man who thinks as much of the school 
as the student body. 



The tennis courts from all appear- 
ances have taken a turn for the worse. 
They are going lower and lower. In 
fact, about three inches. But this will 
not be a detriment but an advantage. It 
won't be long now until the tennis court 
loungers are at it again. What a time is 
had by all. 



It seems to me to be about time for 
Captain McFaul and his lacrosse team to 
ma ke its annual spring appearance. 
Where are the ole whale bones, Mac? 



The ping-pong tournament is progress- 
m 9 with all of its old time vigor and 
vitality. We hear that William K. "Bill" 
Pishburn is stepping right along and is a 
eav y favorite at present. 



^Have you noticed the improvement in 
e Frosh physique since gym classes 
Wer e initiated? We have. Watch Kin- 
" e Ys shoulders, and Speg's head if you 
d °n't believe us. 



Th f 

tavorite indoor sport on the camp- 
ls seems to be indulged in only by the 
ar ° essor s- Now that spring is here, they 
e re pla ying that old game of springing 
* ani s, just like a little robin from the 
S «Y above. 



Ka lo men ready 
for big night 



At a recent meeting of the Y. M. C. 
A. cabinet for the term of 1934-35, the 
question of having a father's day a reg- 
ular occurrence at Lebanon Valley was 
fully discussed. Because of numerous 
activities which usually follow the Easter 
holiday until close of the semester, it was 
decided the program would be impracti- 
cal any more this year. However, it 
will be a regular part of the "Y" program 
beginning with next year. Probably the 
best chance would be at the time of an 
important home football game, when the 
band would be in excellent practice to 
give a recital, and when student school 
spirit is usually at its maximum. With 
the co-operation of students it will be 
b pleasure for both fathers and those 
who dwell here on the campus to intro- 
duce such a program. 



Campus Cuts 



ann j St now there is a group of Kalo 
th 0l , C / Sary celebr aters giving particular 
p ricl 9 1 to n °t only the dramatization for 

nin, a th ni9ht ' but to the Saturda y eve ' 

gr am 3 p fol lows this part of the pro- 
m en rom Seniors down to Fresh- 
the^ ^ e ^ ounc * those who are eager 
Win b n ' 9llt t0 " come on "- Preparation 
d ay> ^ h mental u "til about 3 P.M. Satur- 
but toned en ties wil1 be tied and buttons 



Well, the May Day elections are over. 
Long live the queen and her court 1 One 
cyn'cal senior upon hearing 'he results 
remarked that it wasn't much of an hon- 
or since the expense was pretty great. 
New I ask you, was that soar grapes or 
was it sour grapes? 



Overheard in the library— one fresh- 
man boy speaking seriously to another: 

"Say, why'd you have to come and 
butt in? Now she won't come and talk 
to me anymore," then with a glance at 
her and a deep sigh, "Gosh, her hair 
looks like gold in that sunshine, doesn't 
it?" 

Ordinarily, we'd call it puppy love, but 
a glance at the calendar tells us it's just 
spring-fever. 



Library statistics show that the books 
most in demand are those dealing with 
English history (36) and economics! A 
close third are the Roman history books 
used by the freshmen. We can under- 
stand this last— freshmen are notoriously 
faithful in outside reading. But the other 
two! Truly it passeth all understanding 
and knowledge. Perhaps the moon is 
made of green cheese! 



This occurred in an English tutoring 
class. The teacher who was trying to 
explain figures of speech to a group of 
earnest students asked: 

"What is a metaphor?" 

"To keep cows in," was the prompt 
rejoinder. 

And they make that boy take tutoring! 
We recommend that he receive an "A" 
for that one. 



With half the second semester nearly 
gone, many of the profs are springing 
mid-semester tests. Imagine the surprise 
of one class when their prof— a bitter foe 
of the new-type test— greeted them with 
a series of true-false statements on the 
work of this semester to date. Imagine 
th.-ir surprise when they four i out that 



Woman's Club Hears 
Conservatory Group 



The Woman's Club of Lebanon 
was given a concert by a number of 
college musicians at their club house 
on Wednesday evening, March 21. 
The program was in charge of Pro- 
fessor Edward P. Rutledge. 

Ruth Bailey played a group of pi- 
ano numbers, Helen Summy and Ma- 
tilda Bonanni sang. Martha Elser 
played several violin solos, and Ed- 
mund Umberger gave a clarinet se- 
lection. There were also numbers by 
the violin and the trombone quartette. 
The violin quartette includes Martha 
Elser. Russell Hatz, Oleta Dietrich, 
and Harold Malsh. The trombonists 
are Leslie Saunders, Dale Roth, Frank 
Boran, and Earl Fauber. 



PROF I. F. BOUGHTER 

KILLED IN ACCIDENT 



(Continued from Page One) 



he was professor of history at Salem 
College, West Virginia. In 1925-1926 
he was a graduate student at the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania. He received his 
Masters and Doctors degrees at the Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh, and since 1926 he 
was professor of history in the Fairmont 
State Teachers College, during which 
time he made valuable contributions to 
the history of West Virginia. 

His last appearance on the Lebanon 
Valley campus was February 15 of this 
year, when he brought his affirmative 
debating team here as the guests of L. 
V.'s negative group. 

He is survived by his father. Amos H. 
Boughter, and by his widow, the former 
Miss Vivian Reynolds. 

Dr. Shenk represented the alumni and 
the faculty at the funeral. 



ijll the statements were false! Proression- 
al guessers who answer these questions 
by the laws of probability are asking if 
thi. was in full accord with pi ufc.'->ional 
ethics. 



Speaking of tests, we're going to 
spring a little one of our own. This test 
has been carefully standardized and the 
norm set at 100— for goldfish. Practice 
teachers and morons are expected to 
make at least ten points. So get out your 
pencils, boys and girls, and see how you 
rate in this, the most accurate teit yet 
designed by science for the measuring of 
intelligence. 

I. Identifying the following: 

1 . Cynthia. 

2. "Er-er-er." 

3. "Never trust a man who parts his 
hp''r in the middle." 

4. The three musketeer^ — not Dumas! 
o^ course! 

5. "Deelicious and dee. ght c ul! ' 

6. The senior who already has a job. 

7. 66— not a course n .mber. 
£. Horseface. 

9. "Well, braid my !uvi 

10. The next editor of Ld Vie. 

11. Locate on the campus 

1 Anne without vitamin E— -found in 
I he "rays" of sunshine. 

2. Editor of La Vic on Tuesday nights 
from 12 to 4 o'clock. 

3 Three pints of chet'rv brand v. 

4. The library crpv of Schopenhau- 
er s works. 

5. One pair of purp'e and p nk paja- 
mas. 

6 A co-ed who djes-. i want to go to 
Kalo. 

7. King-Kong— if you kong. 

8. One practice teacher who is crazy 
about it. 

9. Two cherry sundae signs. 

10. One silver lemon fork. 

Well, how're you coming? Some swell 
test, eh? We can keep this thing up for 
hours— do I hear groans?— but we won't. 
Here's a problem, that can be done in a 
second by any fourth grader. Time limit 
is two minutes; for Business Ad students 
an hour extra is granted. 

III. If one Business Ad student can 
eat three times as much as any other per- 
son in the dining hall— and she does— 
what causes her to retain her sylph-like 
slenderness? 

IV. True-False: 

1 . West Hall has a new resident. 

2. The girls have a debating team. 

3. A "Quittie" is a female quitter. 

4. Dr. Selsan spoke on Chicago's 
crime problem. 

5. NRA codes do not apply to college 
students. 

As we said before, we can keep this up 
for hours and hours. But what's the use? 
We know you all are geniuses or you 
wouldn't be reading this column. The 
rest of the test will be supplied for those 
who wish to complete it — upon receipt 
of request for same. 



DR. SHENK ACTIVE 
IN NEW ENGLAND 



The lovely Spring weather and an 
organization meeting of the New Eng- 
land Alumni took Dr. H. H. Shenk to 
the northern district last week-end. Rep- 
resentatives from various New England 
sections were present at the supper meet- 
ing held Saturday evening, March 17, at 
the First Presbyterian Church, Worces- 
ter, Mass., where the Rev. Dr. Charles 
A. Fisher, class of '03, is pastor. An 
election of officers comprised the main 
business issues, when Mr. W. O. Ellis, 

'11, of Concord, Mass., was elected 
president of the newly-organized group, 
and Miss Mildred Christianson, '33, of 
Randolph, Mass., secretary. 

While on this trip Dr. ShenK spent 

ome time in New Haven as the guest 
ivf Dr. and Mrs. Sneath. 



Wrestlers Lose To 
F. and M. Mat Team 



Correction 



In the article carried in La Vie last 
week concerning the "Conserv Drag," an 
omission was made. Inadvertently, 
James H. (Buster) Scott, one of the 
evening's leading performers, was not 
given credit for his part in the program. 

The crooning, which has made Jim 
popular as a soloist with one of Art 
Zellers' dance units throughout the East- 
ern States, was in evidence on Friday 
night. As a result of his pleasing per- 
formance, Jim has added many more fans 
to those in the large audiences that greet 
tarn whenever he appears. 



Baseball Candidates 

Ready For Practice 



And with Lictle Orphan Annie, "The 
Easter bunny will gitcha ef you don't 
watch out!" 



The sudden innovation of balmy wea- 
ther, robins and green grass growing all 
around brings to mind the fact that be- 
fore long the call of the diamond will be 
issued and the regular baseball season 
will have started its annual course. As 
soon as Coach Mylin returns from Buck- 
nell where he is supervising spring foot- 
ball training, daily practice will begin on 
the home field in the east end of Ann- 
ville. 

From all indications, Lebanon Valley 
should trot out a rather classy nine to 
carry on its honor during the '34 season. 
The squad will be little affected by last 
year's graduating class, and the result 
should be a team almost identical to that 
of last year. Catcher Murphy, pitcher 
Wood, ? nd infielder Kraybill are three 
men to be replaced. Even these were not 
regular members of the starting team at 
all times. 

Therefore, with practically the same 
r.quad as last year plus any Freshman 
material that may spring up, the Valley- 
men ought to present a formidable foe 
to any rival nine. Prominent among the 
local bat wielders are infielders, Wil- 
liams, Boran, Rust, Arndt; pitcher, Smith; 
outfielders, Whiting, Barthold, and catch- 
er, Mentzer. 



Friendly Hour Led 
By Margaret Weaver 



Margaret Weaver, the new pro- 
gram chairman of the Y. W. C. A., 
had charge of Friendly Hour in 
North Hall parlor Sunday evening, 
March 18. The service was conduct- 
ed in an informal manner. Rebecca 
Adams led devotions. Martha Faust 
sang the beautiful old hymn "Now 
the Day is Over." The subject of 
the evening discussion was "Spring 
House cleaning." Lena Cockshott 
spoke briefly on this topic, stressing 
the need for recognition and of our 
faults. Miss Cockshott suggested that 
all folks would profit by a periodic 
examination of the character of their 
thoughts and deeds. As a fitting close, 
Ruth Goyne played a piano solo. 



COLLEGIANS' SCORE 31-5 



Forfeits and Injuries Hamper 
Local Team — Beaver 
Pins Opponent 



The Collegians journeyed to Lancaster 
last Saturday afternoon and engaged the 
Franklin and Marshall Academy wrest- 
ling squad in a somewhat impromptu 
meet which the locals dropped, 31-5. 
Two of the weights, 135 and 145 lbs., 
were forfeited to the Academy team be- 
cause the Collegians had no men repre- 
senting that class. 

The only match from which the Col- 
legians emerged successfully was the 125 
lb. class won by "Buster" Beaver. "Bus" 
found little difficulty pinning his man in 
three minutes, fifty-two seconds in the 
first of two three-minute periods. The 
other wrestlers also put up a stiff battle 
before ceding to powerful opposition. 
Houtz, in the unlimited class, would have 
probably defeated his man had it not 
been for a foot injury which gave him 
considerable pain and weakened his re- 
sistance. The results: 

115 lbs.— Buzzell, Collegians, lost to 
Mann, F. and M. Academy, on a fall in 
6 minutes, 37 seconds. 

125 lbs.— Beaver, Collegians, defeated 
Klingbiel, F. 6 M. Academy, on a fall in 
3 minutes, 52 seconds. 

135 lbs.— Forfeited to F. 6 M. Acad- 
emy. 

145 lbs.— Forfeited to F. 6 M. Acad- 
.emy. 

155 lbs.— Chantiles, Collegians, lost to 
Eschbach, F. & M. Academy, by a time 
advantage of 4 minutes, 59 seconds. 

165 lbs.— Thompson, Collegians, lost 
to Nagle, F. & M. Academy, on a fall in 
6 minutes, 49 seconds. 

175 lbs.— Harnish, Collegians, lost to 
Joll, F. G M. Academy, on a fall in 4 
minutes, 5 seconds. 

Unlimited— Houtz, Collegians, lost to 
Bucher, F. & M. Academy, by a time ad- 
vantage of 4 minutes, 47 seconds. 



Girls' Team Closes 
Season By Winning 
From Elizabethtown 



The girls' basketball team closed a 
successful season by beating Elizabeth- 
town on Saturday. The score was 23-22 
in L. V. C.'s favor. Lebanon Valley was 
ahead throughout the whole game. At 
the end of the first half the score was, 
L. V. 16, Elizabethtown 7. Anne Krebs 
was the high scorer with 13 points to her 
credit. Gem Gemmil scored 7 and M. 
Smith 3. 

Last Saturday's line-up was: 

L. V. C. Elizabethtown 

A. Krebs R. F Barnes 

G. Gemmill L. F Bishop 

A. Orth C Brumbaugh 

M. Chamberlain....S. C Duhlebohn 

M. Smith R. G Longenecker 

I. Weirick L. G Althouse 

Substitutions— L. V. C: Smith for 
Gemmill, Adams for Smith; Elizabeth- 
town: Groff for Barnes, Diffenbaugh for 
Bishop. Kapp for Duhlebohn, Barnes for 
Kapp, and Duhlebohn for Althouse. Re- 
feree—Miss Maken. Scorer— E. Fas- 
nacht. Timekeeper— E. Binkley. 

SEASON'S RECORD 

L. V. won five games and lost four. 
L.V.C. Opp. 

18 Juniata 17 

17 Ursinus 43 

20 Elizabethtown 37 

31 Keystone Girls 16 

33 Juniata 34 

32 Penn Hall 30 

35 Albright 27 

20 Keystone Girls 22 



I 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1934 



FUN GALORE AS PLAYGOERS 

RETURN FROM PHILADELPHIA 



In view of the fact that Cassella's 
"Death Takes a Holiday" is to be pre- 
sented by Clio and Philo, a group of the 
selected cast viewed the production of 
this play in the Philadelphia Sixth street 
playhouse, Saturday, March 17, five of 
the cast attended the matinee and an 
other group, the evening production. The 
play was under the direction of Nat 
Burns. 

Those who witnessed the production 
spent a delightful time there. The play 
house itself made the first contribution 
to an enjoyable time. It is a small audi- 
torium, consisting of only one floor and 
very near the stage. The audience was 
very informal, mingling together before 
the play and between the acts. They 
were called to attention by two curtain 
bells and by chimes. 

The play itself was delightfully done. 
With a few exceptions the characters 
were interpreted wisely and effectively. 
The portrayal of Death was especially 
interesting. This is to be no critical re- 
view of the play so with these few com- 
ments we leave it. None who saw it, 
however, were disappointed, but came 
away inspired for their own production. 

The group that saw the play in the 
afternoon included Miss Weirick, Miss 
Matula, Mr. Johnson, Mr. McFaul, and 
Mr. Essick. In the evening Dr. Wallace, 
director of the play, took Dr. Lynch, 
Miss Book, Miss Nye and Mr. Ranck to 
the play. The latter group especially 
spent a marvelous evening. They car- 
ried with them a lunch for the trip which 
they enjoyed while driving. Arriving 
rather early at the playhouse, they then 
proceeded to do some shopping and ex- 



plore the town or city. At eight-thirty 
the call bell was sounded and the play 
was on. After two hours of the absorb- 
ing play the last curtain was drawn and 
the college group proceeded in their at- 
tempt to get back-stage to meet the play- 
ers. It was surprising how all difficulties 
faded, and in no time the embarrassed ac- 
tors, caught midway in their process of 
cleaning up, were signing programs and 
play books for the three autograph seek- 
ers. In the meantime the professors were 
sizing up the "props" and discussing the 
play with Mr. Burns. The invasion of 
the dressing rooms was a decided success 
for chief among the valuable acquisitions 
were lists of music and properties needed 
for the play. In a short while it was 
necessary to leave these most accommo- 
dating people for the hour was late. 

The trip home during the small hours 
of the morning was no less delightful 
Not a person slept. First the play was 
discussed from first to last curtain, but 
gradually the conversation was replaced 
by song. It began with a student trio on 
the rear seat of the Terraplane, and in 
no time the trio was supplemented by 
bass, imitations of locomotive whistles, 
and solos from the front. When the re 
pertoire of popular and well-known songs 
was exhausted, it was necessary to ex- 
temporize. What fun! Then followed 
solos by one of the faculty members, folk 
songs which were new to the others. 
There was no distinction between faculty 
and student, all were enthralled in the 
singing, and before it could be realized, 
there was the college with its clock, 
chiming 2 A. M. Death's holiday was 
finished and sleep once more invaded the 
earth— for a certain group of five. 



NOTICES 

Any upper-class girl desir- 
ing part time employment, see 
Miss Bowman at the Pennway. 



Three pair of Gloves have 
been found in the Pennway. 
Owners can have same if they 
will see Todd. 



Their will be no attraction at 
the Astor Theater this Monday 
evening. Fashion Follies of 
1934 will be presented Wed- 
nesday and Thursday, April 4 
and 5. 



Club Considers Pa. 
Germans at Meeting 



DEBATERS WIN THREE 
CONTESTS DURING WEEK 



Conservatory Ready 
To Stage Operetta 



TO BE "TRIAL BY JURY" 



Summy, Roth, Stabley, and 
Others Star in Gilbert-Sul- 
livan Production 



Fitzgerald To Be 
Speaker On Monday 

IS RAILROAD AUTHORITY 



"Trial by Jury," a Gilbert and Sulli- 
van operetta, will be given in Engle hall 
on Monday evening, March 26. The 
operetta will be given by the class of 
English Activities, as a class project. 
Dr. Wallace and Professor Crawford are 
collaborating in the production to be 
given on Monday evening. In addition 
to these two teachers who handle respec- 
tively the play production and the musi- 
cal end of the class, Dr. Struble has 
charge of the public speaking part of the 
course, and Miss Myers takes care of the 
library work. This year, all conservatory 
students have taken the course during 
either the first or the second semester, 
and the cast has been selected from the 
entire group. 

Charlotte Stabley will take the part of 
the judge; Matilda Bonanni will be the 
plaintiff; Helen Summy, the usher; Dale 
Roth, the defendant; Catherine Heckman, 
the council for the plaintiff, and Tony 
Jagnesak, the foreman of the jury. A 
special orchestra will include Russell 
Hatz and Martha Elser, violins; Earl 
Linger, trumpet; Edmund Umberger and 
Ernest Koch, clarinets; Frank Bryan, 
trombone, and Ruth Bailey, piano. A 
chorus will contain all the other members 
of the class. 

There will be the small admission fee 
of ten cents. The proceeds will be placed 
in the fund for the purchase of band in- 
struments. 

Students, faculty members and friends 

of the college are invited to attend the 
performance. 



Lecturer Familiar to L. V. 
Students Will Talk To 
Business Students 



C. 



Through the efforts of the Business 
Administration department, Mr. John E. 
Fitzgerald, vice chairman of the Commit- 
tee on Public Relations, president's divi- 
sion of the Eastern Railways, and for- 
mer president of the Western Maryland 
Railway, has consented to address the 
student body during the chapel period 
next Monday morning. 

Mr. Fitzgerald is an important person- 
age in the field of transportation, a rail- 
roader of long experience, and the pos- 
sessor of a thorough knowledge of his 
subject. He is not a stranger at Lebanon 
Valley but has been on the campus on 
various occasions in former years, Leba- 
non Valley College being one of the 
four or five schools which he visits. He 
will speak on the coordination of trans- 
portation agencies in the United States, 
the methods by which the railroads are 
attempting to increase their freight and 
passenger traffic, and on other subjects 
of interest in transportation. 

After chapel Mr. Fitzgerald will speak 
to the classes in Business Administration 
and to all others who wish to attend 
from 9:15 to 12:00. These talks will be 
informal in nature with opportunities giv- 
en to the students for asking questions. 
Here is an opportunity for gaining some 
authentic information on one of the big 
problems of our government today. 



[Continued from Page One) 



Wilmington, in western Pennsylvania, 
paid a visit to the campus Thursday eve- 
ning and met the local men's and wom- 
en's teams in Philo and Delphian halls 
respectively. The Westminster students 
planned this visit as the second stop in a 
seven-day tour which brought them as 
far east as Annville on a circuitous tour 
of the entire state. Both debates were 
held under the Oregon plan, and Leba- 
non Valley defended the negative side in 
each debate. 

The speakers in the women's debate 
for Lebanon Valley were Louise Gillan 
and Marion Leisey, while in the men's 
debate they were Robert Womer and 
Calvin Reber. The opponents of the lat- 
ter were Frederick Luderer and Melvin 
Moorhouse. In both encounters the lo- 
cal representatives showed a superiority 
in argument, content, and rebuttal which 
made the decisions quite evident, even 
though the 2-1 decision in the men's case 
suggests the contrary. The judges of the 
women's debate, who were unanimous 
in their decision, were the following : the 
Rev. Mr. Leatherman, Hummelstown, 
Pa.; the Rev. Mr. Keiter, Lebanon, Pa.; 
and the Rev. Mr. Herber, Lebanon, Pa. 
Miss Wood presided over the events in 
Delphian hall. 

Judges for the men's debate were: Mr. 
D. S. Hammond, secretary of Lebanon 
Chamber of Commerce, Lebanon; Mr. 
Carl W. Ziegler, professor of English, 
Annville High School, Annville, and 
Mr. John Haddow, insurance and realty 
agent, Cleona. Prof. R. R. Butterwick 
served as chairman of this debate. 

The debating season of the men's 
teams will be brought to a close next 
Monday night, March 26, when they en- 
gage in a dual debate the teams from 
Millersville State Teachers College. 



The German Club met for its last 
meeting in charge of Miss Reinbold, 
former president of the organization. 
The main topic was the Pennsylvania 
German with an appropriate program 
consisting of typical readings, biogra- 
phies, and legends. Miss Emma Fas- 
nacht presented material on the man- 
ners, customs, and superstitions of 
these people. Dr. Heinrich Har- 
baugh's biography was reviewed by 
Ruth Bright. Edgar Messersmith in- 
troduced a Pennsylvania German 
reading,, "Lah Bizness." E^nma Rein- 
bold chose the blood-curdling theme 
"The Screaming Skull," another typi- 
cal legend. This was followed by 
Pauline Snavely's account of "A 
Story of Regina." 

Not to be outdone by the other 
various campus organizations who 
have felt the urge of spring and elec- 
tioneering, the club elected the new 
officers for the coming year: Presi- 
dent, Edgar Messersmith; vice-presi- 
dent, Sylvia Evelev, and secretary- 
treasurer, Mary Kaufman. 



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Dance 
With the Juniors 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



VOL- XI 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, APRIL 12, 1934 



No. 1 



SOCIETIES' 'HAY FEVER' 
ATTACK S TH E CAMPUS 

INTRODUCING NOEL COWARD TO L. V. C. 

Or. Struble Directs Sophisticated But Decidedly Pleasant and 
Interesting Presentation — The Bliss Family, A Melodramatic 
Group, Give Vent to Their Sentimental Emotions. 



On Friday evening, March 23, the Kalozetean and Delphian 
Literary Societies united to produce Noel Coward's comedy, "Hay 
Fever," and filled Engle Hall with the heartiest laughter the place 
has heard in years. 

The setting of the play was attractive, the casting was judi- 
cious, and the acting flowed so swiftly and easily that the audience 
was able to sit back comfortably (as it is not always able to do at 
an amateur performance) and enjoy a piece of good-humored non- 
sense which, like all good comedy, was both absurdly like life and 
absurdly unlike it. 

There was no plot of any consequence.* 
But there was plenty of interest of a hay- 
feverish kind: a succession of hectic 
sneezes and snuffles in the life of a fam- 
ily sufficiently eccentric to let us all feel 
comfortably superior to them while they 
did or said unblushingly the sort of 
things we are always in mortal terror of 
doing or saying ourselves. The absence 
of plot threw a heavier burden than 
usual on the actors, who had no story 



interest to help them carry the audience 
over the thin places. The director, Dr. 
Struble, and the cast are to be congratu- 
lated especially on the sustained interest 
achieved in their handling of a play 
which for the reason just mentioned is 
something of a graveyard for amateurs. 

There was plenty of variety. The 
characters were a jazzy lot, loving and 
quarreling with a kind of thorny egotism 
that revealed all their eccentricities and 
contrasts. There were, besides, merciful 
changes in tempo that saved the nerves 
of the audience from the nightmare of 
having to laugh always at the same kind 
°f humor. The speed ranged from the 
dawdling inanities of Jackie's conversa- 
tion with the prim diplomat who pro- 
nounced Rome "a beautiful city," to the 
shrieking melodrama of "Love's Whirl- 
wind" when Judith Bliss' mind slipped a 
co 9 and she slid from the pseudo-tragedy 
of her immediate life to the more seduc- 

( Continued on Page 2, Column 2) 



Plans For Junior Prom 
Soon To Be Announced 



With 



ay 



the advent of spring and May 
elections, comes the great gala 

mT of the ycar to be held Ma V H - 
«. at the Hershey Park ballroom. 

in ans for tlle Junior Prom are progress- 
c 9 rapidly under the able supervision of 
aric j Per Arndt. The prom is an annual 
traditional fete sponsored by the Ju- 
Uor class. 
A f 

i dent j Weeks ago Howard Lloyd, pres- 
Pron ° * Uni ° r class ' announ ced the 
a s cha ^ mniittee with Casper E. Arndt 
Were ^*° an ' The other students who 
serve ^ P ° i,Ued b V the class officers to 
Weave " p h ' S COmmIttcc are Margaret 
sko - G | herine Wagner, Helen Gru- 
Ge r Q „ u ? Bau 9 h er. Frank Boran, 

D urin H ner and Gerald Russell. 
of this 



s Co vacation the members 

9nd listen" 1 " 1 '"^ Were busy '"terviewing 
e most " 9 to orchestras. A number of 
" Prominent bands have been con- 
0tlniled on Page 4, Column 2) 



Glee Club Has 
Numerous Concerts 



RUTLEDGE LEADS GROUP 



Tower City, Pinegrove, Palmy- 
ra, Hershey, Columbia Sta- 
tions for Campus Songsters 



While most of us were packing to go 
home, the members of the Glee Club mo- 
tored to Tower City and presented a 
concert in the Porter Township High 
School. The trombone quartette, con- 
sisting of Frank Bryan, Dale Roth, Les- 
lie Saunders and Earl Fauber, was the 
feature of this concert. 

Returning from vacation the Glee 
Club, under Professor Rutledge's baton, 
plunged into another series of concerts 
presenting three within four days. The 
first of this series was at the armory in 
Pinegrove on April 5. The audience was 
unusually large and most appreciative. 
After the concert, the sponsors held a 
small reception for the Glee Club. 

The following evening a concert was 
given at the United Brethren church in 
Palmyra. The soloists were Matilda 
Bonanni, Martha Elser, Dale Roth, and 
Earl linger. 

Sunday afternoon the Glee Club ful- 
filled an engagement in Hershey sing- 
ing during the afternoon community ser- 
vice. They presented four selections— 
"Alleluia, Amen" (Handel); "Vale of 
Tuoni" (Sibelius); "O Bone Jesu" (Sa- 
Satini). The latter two were a capella 
numbers, and the old Negro spiritual, "Go 
Down Moses," arranged by Noble Cain. 

The next concert will be sponsored by 
the Ladies Guild of the Episcopal church 
in Columbia and will be presented in 
the parish hall of the church. 



57 th Anniversary 
Celebration Held 
By Kalozeteans 

FORMAL DINNER -DANCE 



Hoover and Klitch Share Lau- 
rels For Dance 
Success 



The Kappa Lambda Sigmas came 
through with a bang once more in stag- 
ing one of the most successful social 
functions in Lebanon Valley's history, 
the annual Kalo dinner-dance, on Satur- 
day evening, March 24. The sparkling 
comedy and the reception on Friday 
night, presented in conjunction with Del- 
phian, along with the formal dinner- 
dance Saturday night provided the Kalos 
and their partners with a truly banner 
week-end. 

The dinner-dance was scheduled to be- 
gin at 7:30 P. M. in the ballroom of the 
Hotel Penn Harris, Harrisburg. Due to 
inclement weather some of the guests 
were slightly late in arriving and conse- 
quently the first course was not served 
until just before 8:00 o'clock. The ball- 
room presented a handsome appearance 
with large tables for six along the sides 
of the dance floor and the orchestra 
stage at the far end. During the meal 
Dan Gregory furnished dinner music, and 
near the end of it favors and dance pro- 
grams were distributed. Each of the 
Kalos' partners received something new 
in dance favors, a chain identification 
bracelet engraved with Kalo's Greek 
symbols. The dance programs were of 
maroon suede and gold bearing the col- 
lege seal, the words Kappa Lambda Sig- 
ma, and an attached gold cord and pen- 
cil. 

After dinner dancing continued until 
until 12:30. Dan Gregory's orchestra fur- 
nished varied and delightful music with 
numerous novelty numbers. Part of the 
musical program was broadcast over 
WKBO. In addition to the ballroom 
proper the guests had the use of all the 
spacious lounges attached to it. During 
intermission many couples strolled down 
stairs to listen to Ty LeRoy's Scotch 
Highlanders who were playing for dan- 
cing in the main dining room. 

The patron guests of Kalo for the af- 
fair included Dr. and Mrs. Struble, Prof. 
Stokes, Dr. and Mrs. Derickson, and Dr. 
and Mrs. Stonecipher, to whom Kalo 
conveyed its appreciation by showing 
them a delightful evening. Many alumni 
guests were present making the total pre- 
sent about sixty couples. 

The committee for the dinner-dance 
consisted of Earl Hoover, chairman; 
Morgan Edwards, Michael Kanoff, Le- 
Roy Miller, James Fridy. 



FROCK AND METOXEN 
NAMED MENT ORS HERE 

WON FAME AS VALLEY ATHLETES 

Terms of Contract and Salary Are Not Revealed— Frock to Serve 
As Head Football Coach— Metoxen As Assistant Grid Mentor 
And Head Coach of Basketball and Baseball. 



Court Entertainment 
Theme for May Day 

SHAAR, KENYON DIRECT 



En- 



Jerome "Jerry" Frock, of Harrisburg, will succeed E. E. 
"Hooks" Mylin as head football coach at Lebanon Valley College, 
according to official announcement made by Dr. Clyde A. Lynch 
early this week. Simultaneously with this announcement it was 
revealed that Emerson "Chief" Metoxen will serve as assistant to 
Frock in football and will assume complete charge of basketball 
and baseball. 

Little information had previously been given out regarding 
the choice of new mentors, so that the surprise announcement ex- 
ploded many wild predictions which have been made by numerous 

sports writers ever since Mylin signed a 
Bucknell contract. Neither the duration 
of the contracts nor the amounts of the 
salaries was disclosed in the official an- 
nouncement. 

"Jerry" Frock got his start in football 
while attending Harrisburg Tech, noted 
prior to its abandonment for its power- 
ful grid teams. He later played at Leba- 
non Valley under the coaching of Henry 
L. Wilder and E. E. Mylin. His versa- 
tility was attested to by the fact that he 
played center, end, and fullback while 
performing for the Blue and White. 

In addition to a great reputation as a 
football player, Frock will bring with 
him an impressive record as a teacher of 
the sport. Having graduated from Leba- 
non Valley with the class of 1925, he im- 
mediately took up the coaching assign- 
ment at Keystone Academy. He then 
took over sports instruction at Collings- 
wood, N. J. High School for the 1926- 
1927 term. He came to Annville in 1927, 
remaining for two years as head coach 
at Annville High and line coach at L. V. 
C. In 1929 he returned to his home city 
to become a member of the faculty of 
John Harris High School, where he also 
served as line coach of the football squad. 
He has remained in this position to the 
present time. 

Since Frock has been assisting at the 
Harrisburg school, the John Harris grid- 
( Continued on Page 3, Column 2) 



"The Conqueror" Will Be 
acted For Queen's En- 
joyment 



Beautiful, flimsy, ruffled dresses and all 
sorts of elaborate costumes are promised 
for this year's annual May Day program, 
to be held on the campus Saturday, May 
5. The pageant is under the direction of 
Miss Mildred Kenyon, head of the de- 
partment of physical education for wom- 
en, and Prof. Charles Shaar, head of 
Harrisburg Ballet and Dramatic Dan- 
cing School. 

The affair is in the form of a court 
entertainment presented by various 
groups of dancers for the May Queen 
and her court. 

The college band will lead the proces- 
sion, followed by the May Queen, court 
and attendants. The May Pole Dance 
will be presented by twenty couples se- 
lected from the Junior class. The crown- 
ing of the queen of the pageant, Miss 
Minna WolfsKeil of Elizabeth, N. J., 
will follow along with the presentation 
of gifts by the four class presidents. 

"The Conqueror" is a one act ballet 
which has a cast of over a hundred dan- 
cers. It will be presented in front of the 
queen's throne. The scene of the ballet 
is laid at the Soiree of the Pagan Em- 
press. There are five groups of dances: 
"The Dance of the Slave Girls," 
"The Chariot Race," "The Archer," 
"The Ball Dance," and 'The Wrestling 
to Death of the Pagan Prisoners." These 

(Continued on Page 4, Column 1) 



Cupid's Darts Take Heavy Toll of Alumni 



According to a recent survey conduct- 
ed by students of Professor Gingrich's 
class in sociologcal problems, it must be 
readily admitted that Eros has done ex- 
ceedingly fine work among the Lebanon 
Valley alumni. At least the statistics that 
were found prove that what he has ac- 
complished has had the tendency to be 
unusually successful. 

Out of the 1,818 alumni who gradu- 
ated from Lebanon Valley since 1900, 
there have been 1 1 1 marriages between 
the members of the various classes. 



The "rush season" or the year in which 
Cupid reached the peak of his success 
was 1926, when 16 graduates were tied 
together, matrimonially speaking of 
course. The record of 1927 ran a close 
second with 14 graduates, and 12 in 1928. 
Since 1928, up to and including 1933, 
the annual average of students has been 
8. 

The unusual fact that 222 out of 1,818 
or 12.2 per cent of all the students who 
enter Lebanon Valley inter-marry be- 
comes even more surprising and extraor- 



dinary when revealed that there have 
been only 2 divorces as a result of the 
1 1 1 marriages, or one out of every 55. 
Quite a record! It seems to qualify L. V. 
as a matrimonial bureau for those good 
old-fashioned long-lasting marriages that 
are mentioned in books on the required 
reading lists of all college freshmen. 

The study also revealed that there are 
20 families that have only one child, 13 
with two children, six with three, and 
four with four. The average number of 

(Continued on Page 4, Column 2) 



Raqueteers Prepare For 
Encounter With E-town 

After a fairly good season last year, 
L. V.'s tennis aspirants have been called 
to rally 'round and prepare themselves 
ror a bigger and better 1934 season. 

With the difficult task of finding a suc- 
cessor to the brilliant Claude Donmoyer 
confronting him, Coach Stevenson is 
counting heavily upon four veterans. 
Dick Walborn, Dick Ax, "Hib" Nye and 
Fred Lehman all saw considerable ser- 
vice last year, and a wealth of new ma- 
terial reported Monday to offer their ser- 
vices. Manager Nye has arranged an 
interesting schedule of fifteen matches, 
which will be announced in the near fu- 
ture. The opener will be with Elizabeth- 
town College on Monday, April 23, on 
the home courts. 

For the first time in several years, col- 
lege students are putting the tennis courts 
in playing condition. Financed by a por- 
tion of the federal CWA grant, the pro- 
ject was begun on Monday and will be 
finished before long. 



I 



3° 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 12, 1934 



3ta Vit Collegtenne 

ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Under 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Helen Earnest, '35 Editor-in-Chief 

George Hiltner, '35 Associate Editor 

Richard Baus, '37 Managing Editor 

David Yake, '36 Asst. Man. Editor 

REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Catherine Wagner, '35 
Sylvia Evelev, '36 
Louise Gillan, '36 
Lester Krone, '36 
Marian Leisey, '36 
Maxine Earley, '37 

Grace Naugle, '37 General Reporters 

Ida K. Hall, '35 Conservatory 

William Earnest, '37 Athletics 

Miriam Eichner, '37 Alumni, 

Louis Straub, '37 Philokosmian 

Charles Hauck, '35 Kalozetean 

Jane Shellenberger, '36 Clionian 

Marietta Ossi, '35 Delphian 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Kenneth Sheaffer, '35. .Business Manager 
C. Edward Arndt, '35. Asst. Bus. Manager 
Robert Cassel, '36. . .Circulation Manager 
Elwood Needy, '37 Asst. Cir. Manager 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 

Single Copies 5 cents 

Subscription $1-00 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter, under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 

THURSDAY, APRIL 12, 1934 
NEW MERIT AWARDS 



SOCIETIES, "HAY FEVER" 

ATTACKS THE CAMPUS 



LA VIE LUMINARIES END ACTIVITY 



(Continued from Page One) 



Not only has the depression hit Leba- 
non Valley in general, but many students 
may feel the loss of the customary pre- 
sentation of charms, footballs, letters^-or 
various other awards. These emblems of 
service are after all only tokens of our 
beloved alma mater, but with no concrete 
merit in after-college days. They will 
scarcely be recognized in applying for a 
much-coveted position, and their attrac- 
tion will soon fade into insignificance as 
we stride forward in our every-day life. 
You may think this sounds like an ex- 
tremely mercenary attitude, but after all 
are we not living and thinking in a de- 
cidedly practical age? 

It is not our wish to belittle former 
methods, but in view of present condi- 
tions one should endeavor to lend his co- 
operation to the college cause and accept 
without resistance the policies to be fol- 
lowed—not a passive acceptance to be 
sure, but one resulting from cold delibera- 
tive thought on the merit of these condi- 
tions. 

Psychology teaches us that we can not 
break up a habit without a worthwhile 
substitute, and so the administration is 
offering to all students— outstanding in 
some extra-curricular activity— a college 
certificate or identification award show- 
ing to the public what one has accom- 
plished through four years of college in- 
fluence. No, of course not every Tom, 
Dick and Harry will walk away from 
Annville's sunny clime with a merit 
award tucked beneath his arm or crushed 
into his bulging suitcase. Only those par- 
ticularly excelling along some line of ac- 
tivity will be privileged to acquire this 
honorary symbol. It will be well worth 
individual attention for the student body 
to keep this new award policy in mind. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



Another college romance ended by way 
of marriage when two L. V. graduates 
were united in the bonds of wedlock at 
Valley Stream, New York, on March 31, 
1934. The bride, a member of the class 
of 1929, was Miss Elizabeth Johanna 
Matthes, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Os- 
car H. Matthes, and the bridegroom Mr. 
Philip Barnes of the class of 1932. 



tively theatrical tragedy of the star role 
in her greatest play. 

Mary Gossard as Judith Biiss warmed 
up to the theatrical sentimentalities of 
the "beautiful and sad," disillusioned, 
honestly hypocritical (because cabbage- 
brained) ex-actress who was determined 
to return to the stage because she had 
been disappointed at not receiving 
enough letters requesting her to do so. 
She drooped and stiffened and waved 
her large hat in the air with suitable 
tosses of the head to register her chame- 
leon-like moods. 

Allen Buzzell flitted about excellently 
as David, the neglected (and neglecting) 
husband of Judith Bliss. "No, he's not 
dead; he's upstairs," said his wife. He 
wrote novels and studied flappers in do- 
mestic suroundings. His interview with 
Jackie, the flapper whom he had invited 
down to the house from London, afforded 
an interesting variant of Ophelia's fa- 
mous meeting with Hamlet of the un- 
braced doublet. "It was Mr. Bliss asked 
me down," said Jackie disconsolately, 
"and he hasn't paid any attention to me 
at all. I went into his study soon after I 
arrived yesterday, and he said, "Who the 
hell are you?" Ophelia speaking: "O, 
what a noble mind is here o'erthrown!" 

June Gingrich as Jackie was perhaps 
the high light of the play. Shy, nervous, 
a perfect idiot in conversation, she car- 
ried the part off with exactly the right 
hesitation and the right variation between 
the strained fatuities of her polite conver- 
sation and the sudden outbursts of nerv- 
ous reaction as when she broke down 
over one of those insane parlor games 
( which have cast a shadow over so many 
lives that to some of the audience this 
part was scarcely funny) and refused to 
dance "in the manner of the word." 
Charles Hauck played up to her magni- 
ficently in the part of Richard Greatham, 
the complacent young diplomat who 
spoke so nicely about the weather, the 
superior quality of the English spring, 
and the charm of various countries in 
Europe, that he made the audience want 
to pick the hymn books from under their 
seats and hurl them at his head. 

Charles Furlong as Sandie Tyrell, the 
long-legged athlete who worshipped Ju- 
dith and straightway fell in love with her 
daughter, made an attractive foil to the 
high-strung eccentrics about him. But 
the house at last got on even Sandie's 
nerves, and the last act was punctuated 
with his agonized hiccoughs, which had 
been brought on by a frantic attempt to 
gobble a breakfast before any members 
of the Bliss family should find him and 
make love to him in the breakfast room. 

Ida Hall as Myra made an excellent 
sophisticate— worldly and satirical but 
not a bit unpleasant. Myra provided the 
nearest approach to sanity which the play 
gave us, and her comments might at 
times be taken as a kind of chorus— an 
introduction of normal waking life 
against which the nightmare of the Bliss 
household might be measured. "You're 
the most infuriating set of hypocrites I've 
ever seen," she said. "This house is a 
complete feather-bed of false emotions— 
you're posing, self-centered egotists, and 
I'm sick to death of you." 

Simon and Sorel Bless (taken by 
George Sherk and Catherine Wagner) 
made a lively pair of yappy, spoiled 
children, who fell in love carelessly and 
squabbled furiously all through the play. 
If any part dragged, these two had only 
to enter and lip it alive again. George 
Sherk was never better in his dramatic 
career. One might have thought the 
stage was his natural element, he was so 
much at home on it. Catherine Wagner, 
too, made her part completely her own. 
These two joined Judith to produce the 
grand climax of Act II, where Sorel (as 
George in "Love's Whirlwind") springs 




EDMUND H. UMBERGER 

Edmund (ex-chief) Umberger, versa- 
tile retiring editor of La Vie Collegienne, 
is withdrawing his efforts from the noble 
cause of college service. His work on 
the staff can indeed be highly praised, as 
he was not only an indefatigable work- 
er but an endless one, and we even hear 
of him writing editorials and forgotten 
write-ups in the wee hours of the morn- 
ing — this can be offered as a suggestion 
for the tired expression often noticed on 
Edmund's countenance. Note the quiet 
calm now registered there. Can he come 
to town on the clarinet? With the urge 
of spring calling, when a young man's 
fancy turns to love, not only "chief" but 
also the inevitable Martha will sally forth 
over the winding roads and mountains to 
future victories. 



JOHN J. TODD 

John Todd, known to all humans as 
Jack, is the retiring business manager of 
La Vie. His powers are also numerous 
—not only can he hold his own with 
women, but also as the chief hash stin- 
ger in North Hall's portly domains, or as 
the wielder of the College Rambler ba 
ton. Moreover, he was a member of this 
year's wrestling team, and we remember 
the great pathos of this hulking indivi 
dual covered with painful injuries and 
bruises. A loyal and hard-working Kalo- 
zetean and this year's president of that 
awe-inspiring body, the men's senate, 
where he sternly administered the laws 
of the land and meted out justice to all 
those who were worthy. 



The French are fairly steeped ■ 
French tradition and culture before th 
graduate from the lycees or high school?' 
Upon leaving high school they have re " 
-cived a bachelor of arts degree app r0)( j 
mately equivalent to that received ^ 
American colleges. However the French 
lycee student pays for this in general 
health, leaving the lycee in "absolutely 
run down and puny condition." 

Stookins was sincere in stating that i n 
addition to the broadening influence 
which he experienced in a year at France 
he feels that he has come to appreciate 
lege education could give in Am?rica. 
the French, to know their peculiarities 
and to regard them with a feeling f 
brotherhood. He considers his year j n 
Trance the most broadening influence up 
on his life and believes that it had as 
much broadening effect as a whole col. 



at Simon (as Victor), and Judith (as 
Zara) rushes between them screaming, 
"Don't strike! He is your father!" and 
falls in a dead faint. Curtain. 

Claire Adams made in Clara a most 
original and effective stage servant: 
brisk, slapdash, impudent, sentimental, 
loyal, calling the members of the house- 
hold "dear" and arguing with the guests 
about the sugar. Miss Adams handled 
this character part so well that we fore- 
see more important successes for her in 
the future. 

The make-up was excellent, and the 
details of the stage business were well 
attended to. 

The cast might profitably have be- 
stowed a little more time on "the 
tongues" than was evident in their pro- 
nunciation of the French place names 
tossed about by the Bliss family while 
discussing David's novel. A college au- 
dience is sensitive to such things. Per- 
haps we should excuse the lapse on the 
grounds that an intentional slur was thus 
cast on the Blisses themselves, following 
the well-known principle that 

Where ignorance is Bliss 
'Tis folly to be wise. 

"Hay Fever" is a splendid play for 
relaxation. — a farrago of nonsense, with 
nothing to be taken to heart, nothing that 
the spectators need feel they ought to 
carry away with them. All the charac- 
ters, situations, and emotions are shal- 
low. There is not a serious thought in 
the three acts (unless it be one suggested 
by the title, "Hay Fever": namely, that 
the Bliss family is, to a healthy human 
society, what hay fever is to a healthy 
human body). 

That is why we laugh over it so 
freely: there is no taint of the lecture 
room. It is not for edification. We learn 
nothing from it of the whole duty of man. 
It does not (like a Shaw play) contain 
a more or less hidden treatise on sociol- 
ogy, religion, or sex. It does not throw 
light on the bourgeoisie or the prole- 
tariat or the condition of Germany since 
1933. It does not (like an O'Neill play) 
exhibit the subconscious ticking like a 
clock on the wall. It does not even set 
out to destroy our illusions for us, in the 
manner of our earnest young modern 
sophisticates. 



It is a sophisticated play. But Noel 
Coward is the blessed kind of sophisti- 
cate who does not try to teach us any- 
thing. He has no propaganda. Of all 
monstrosities, the didactic sophisticate is 
the worst— a kind" of inverted Malvolio, 
who, because he is not virtuous, thinks 
there should be no virtue in the world. 
Noel Coward is not like that. If he 
breaks convention in his plays, it is only 
to surprise and amuse us, not to make us 
think. 

Paul A. W. Wallace. 




BEYOND # CftMPUS 



In a recent interview by the Brown 
Daily Herald with Joseph S. Stookins, 
who spent last year studying at the Uni- 
versity of Paris, a keen insight of the 
life and character of the French student 
was gathered. Stookins says that the 
French student is interested and well in- 
formed in all subjects pertaining to the 
culture and politics of his country. He 
reads all newspapers, he is particularly 
"savant" on the acdvities of the cham- 
ber of deputies, and his protests against 
governmental functions almost always 
take the form of a riot. Stookins' living 
quarters were so situated that he could 
look down from his balcony into the 
midst of some of these riots in the Latin 
quarter. He has seen active conflict be- 
tween gendarmes and students from the 
universities and lycees where they were 
display such placards as "Pas Un Son 
A l'Amerique." All the student sentiment 
during the war debt question, Stookins 
emphasizes, was directed against the 
chamber of deputies rather than Ameri- 
ca. Often professors are victims as an 
excuse for some of their riots. Classroom 
grievences will often be the causes of 
riots, the rioters carrying it as far as to 
the homes of the accused faculty mem- 
ber. 



Trial By Jury" 
Is Presented To 
Artistic Audience 



This Gilbert and Sullivan operetta 
"Trial by Jury," was presented by the 
English Activities class on March 26, un- 
der the direction of Professor Alexander 
Crawford and Dr. P. A. W. Wallace. 
The dramatic roles were enacted by 
Charlotte Stabley, judge; Matilda Bon- 
anni, plaintiff; Catherine Heckman, coun- 
sel for plaintiff; Dale Roth, defendant; 
and Helen Summy, usher. The remain- 
ing members of the class were brides- 
maids, spectators and jurors. 

The court room is the scene of the 
operetta. The plaintiff has been jilted 
and is suing the defendant for breach of 
promise. The trial proceeds, but under 
no condition will the defendant marry 
the girl. So the judge, smitten by the 
loveliness of the girl, says that he will 
marry her, and thus brings the operetta 
to a close. 

The costumes were very appropriate 
and the interpretation of the score was 
done in a very artistic manner. The 
comments of the student body were very 
favorable, and many have expressed the 
desire to hear another operetta soon 
again. 



Rejuvenation Of 

Y. M. C. A. Rooms 



The newly installed Y. M. C. A. cabi- 
net has begun to show evidences of an 
intensive and progressive program of an 
ameliorating type for the coming term. 
At a recent meeting plans were laid out 
for work during the coming year, and 
already the results of this aroused inter' 
est has begun to show fruition. 

For several days before the Easter va- 
cation, members of the cabinet were busi- 
ly engaged in the "Y" room of the mens 
dorm, beautifying the walls and floors 
and making repairs. During this time no 
one was allowed to use the rooms. 

How- 
ever, when they were once more ope* 1 ^ 
for use, they gave the appearance of i°' 
dustrious rejuvenators. Attractive P ic ' 
tures adorned the walls, a new rug c° v ' 
ercd the south side of the small Y 
room floor, new ash trays and fl°° r 
amps were placed at convenient pla ceS 
throughout the two rooms, and ma^ 
other improvements were apparent. Th e 
following additions and repairs have be e ° 
made or are to be made in the near f u ' 
ture: curtains in the windows of the r e ' 
ception room, a magazine rack in whi c ' 
will appear issues of Colliers, Liberty 
American, a newspaper file, a supply 
ping-pong balls and chalk, new pool ta' 
ble lights, a radio extension for the sp ca ' 
er in the recreation room, repair work 
the ping-pong and pool tables and ° fl 
the door connecting the two* r0 °^ 
Quoits have also been purchased for 
use of those interested in that activity- 
The new "Y" cabinet is to be con9 r3 
ulated on its active work in making a P^ 



sentable reception room for visitors 
frequently come to the men's dormi 



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LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 12, 1934 



PAGE THREE 



y 
,1 tr 

■k & 

i <*> 
r the 

ty- 

pre' 



SfOflT 1 SHOTS 

yj e \\, well, well! In the last edition ol 
£ a ^t'e, wc fi" 1 ^ an article to tne effec* 

t developments are slow in the nam- 
of successor; to E. E. "Hooks" My- 
« and "Marty" McAndrews. Maybe 



were wrong! 



prospects are bright for Coach Mylin 
end his eleven-year reign over Leba- 
on Valley athletics in a blaze of glory. 
vVith the pitching proposition the only 
-pparent worry, high hopes are held that 
k V. C will be able to displace Juniata 
aS Eastern Pennsylvania Intercollegiate 
League baseball champions. Here's luck 
to 'em! 



Spring weather has also brought out 
the racqueteers. They, too, anticipate a 
<uccessful season, despite the graduation 
of last year's star, Claude Donmoyer. 
Here's luck to them, too! 



The entrants in the ping-pong tourna- 
ment are coming down the stretch neck 
a nd neck. Fishburn, Schanbacher, Ax, 
Lehman and Walborn are fighting it out 
for the two places in the grand finale, 
which will be played in the near future. 
In order to be strictly impartial, we'll 
wish them all lots of luck. 



Have you seen the girls lashing the 
air wildly in gym class? If you haven't 
make it your business to watch them 
some time; it's amusing, to say the least. 
The new game is badminton, an English 
creation; the racqueteer-shaped bats are 
called shuttlecocks; and the object is to 
keep the feathered ball going back and 
forth across the net without touching 
the floor. 



Second only to badminton in respect 
to amusement afforded spectators is the 
game the boys' gym classes play. Oh, 
basketball, what crimes are committed 
in thy name! 



Some of us are getting quite a bit of 
amusement from watching our class- 
mates at work preparing the tennis courts 
for the season. Perhaps it's because 
weve never had the pleasure of seeing 
them work before this. 



In our zeal for pursuit of studies and 
s Ports, let us not forget to uphold that 
a 9e-old traditional Lebanon Valley insti- 
tution-the Hiking Club. There are a 
of the famous college couples in- 
dulging in those refreshing early-morn- 
ln 9 walks, but the club is not being given 
jj e support it deserves. Come on gang! 
Ra « you to Kreider's. 



Did you know we had a wrestling 
jjampion at L. V. C? In the central 

en nsylvania Amateur championships 
, el d last week at the Central Y. M. C. A. 
*j Harrisburg, the Valley's "King-Kong" 
of t n ^ ^ outz ~" was crowned champ 

,. e ""limited weight class. The grap- 

' n 9 freshman brushed aside his first two 
a ^ 0l j ents in the fast times of 59 seconds 
In th minute ' ^ seconds, respectively. 

feat H f ' nalS laSt Saturda y ni 9 ht - he de " 
hy ed John Kimmel of the Central Y. M. 

Seco ^ d time advantage of 3 minutes, 15 
me nt r" 3 1 ^" minute time limit engage- 
bo^' ° ut2, who has been winning his 
of c S q han dily all year, was in the pink 
Mde hon ' and offset his opponent's 
speed eXperience w ith a fine display of 
an d strength. Congrats, Kong! 



not f a ° jr ° r c °Hegian, Guy Beaver, did 

rnent \x/ Ulte SO We " in ^ e same tourna- 
he^ as rcst ling in the 118-pound class, 
l ed in t,le opening round by 
Hiy, 7* Mann of F- and M. Acade- 



the 



i? ^ . , en d of the regulation time, 
* 2 Was ad i ud ged a draw, but af 



St 



minnt 



es and 27 seconds of the over- 
it n ° d - Guy was finally forced to 



L. V. Strong Man Bows 
To Cheering Public 

John Houtz, local "King-Kong" and 
.aember of the Collegians wrestling team 
recently stepped into the limelight by 
winning the Central Pennsylvania wrest- 
ling championship in the unlimited class. 
This tournament is considered to be one 
it which the best amateur teams of east- 
ern Pennsylvania are represented, the 
foremost of these being Manheim A. C, 

F. &'M. Academy Carlisle Y. M. C. A., 
York Y. M. C. A. and Harrisburg Y. M. 

G. A. Any wrestler of amateur standing 
who has never wrestled on a recognized 
college team is eligible for competition. 

King-Kong met little opposition, dis- 
posing of his first two rivals in short 
bouts on falls. He defeated Snyder of 
the Harriiburg "Y" on the opening night 
in one minute, forty-two seconds. Christ, 
his next victim, fell in one minute, four 
seconds, and Kimmel, whom he wrestled 
for the championship, bowed to Lebanon 
Valley's man mountain on a convincing 
time advantage. 



FROCK AND METOXEN 

NAMED MENTORS HERE 



(Continued from Page One) 



sters have met with marked success, win- 
ning the state championship in 1929, and 
losing to Windber High in an upset for 
the state title this past season. 

"Chief" Metoxen is also a former Leb- 
anon Valley sports luminary. He is a 
full-blooded Oneida Indian of the Iro- 
quois nation and comes from Glen Bay, 
Wisconsin. He attended the famous Car- 
lisle Indian school prior to his enrollment 
at Lebanon Valley. Metoxen was an out- 
standing sports figure throughout his col- 
lege career, especially on the basketball 
court, where his unerring eye gained 
him a wide reputation. 

Like Frock, "Chief" also boasts an en- 
viable record as a coach. His most note- 
worthy feat as a mentor was the develop- 
ment of the famous 1929 York Collegiate 
Institute court team. That team won the 
Eastern States basketball championship 
and was victorious in the University of 
Pennsylvania tournament. 

Metoxen remained as coach at Y. C. I. 
form 1927 to 1930, when he took up the 
coaching position at Swarthmore Prep 
School for a year. He is at present sports 
instructor at Glen-Nor High School at 
Glenolden, Pennsylvania. This past sea- 
son his team was runner-up for the dis- 
trict title so that the wily Indian has ap- 
parently not lost any of his ability to in- 
struct basketeers. 

Both of the new sports instructors will 
take up their duties at Lebanon Valley in 
die fall, and will take over full control of 
1934-19.35 athletics. 



ADMINISTRATION NOTES 



April 3— Delivered an address, 
"Youth Remembers Christ," in the 
Lancaster Covenant Church at its 
50th anniversary. 

April 8— Presented an educational 
address at the Ironville U. B. Church. 

April 10— Dr. and Mrs. Lynch were 
present at a meeting of the Reading 
Alumni, held in Wyomissing. 

April 13— The Baltimore Alumni 
will be represented by the college 
with Drs. Grimm and Shenk present. 

April 14— At 2 P. M. Dr. Lynch 
will address the Pittsburgh Alumni in 
Webster Hall on Fifth avenue. 

April 15— Dr. Lynch, accompanied 
by Dale Roth and Helen Summy, will 
speak at the anniversary of the Avon 
U. B. Church. 

April 17— Will address the Lykcns 
Masonic lodge. 

April 20— Will be guest speak- 
er at the Evangelical Congregational 
Church of Annville for their public 
temperance meeting. 



Diamond Athletes 
Are Primed For 
Championship Drive 

SIX VETERANS REPORT 



Eleven Games Scheduled, Fea- 
turing Two Battles With 
Albright 



The baseball season is here. With the 
:nd of the Easter vacation and the return 
of Coach Mylin from Bucknell, the base- 
ball hopefuls have been working out in 
daily practices on the college field. Since 
the first game is to be played on April 27, 
the diamond candidates have about two 
weeks to round into shape and prepare 
for a championship drive. 

Last year the Valleyites broke even in 
four Eastern Pennsylvania intercollegi- 
ate league games, with two tilts rained 
out. Juniata was crowned champion of 
the league last year. 

Coach Mylin has six 1933 letter men 
around which to build up a formidable 
nine. The veterans of last season's cam- 
paign are Captain Russ Williams, Frank- 
ie Boran, Charlie Rust, "Dutch" Arndt, 
"Bill" Smith, and "Sully" Whiting. 

The pitching staff offers the greatest 
trouble, with southpaw Bill Smith as the 
only veteran hurler. It is believed, how- 
ever, that he will be able to bear the 
brunt of the opposing attacks, with John 
Witters as a relief twirler. The gradua- 
tion of the 1933 catcher, Murphy, and 
the withdrawal of George Konsko leave 
Warren Mentzer and Pete Kandrat .to 
battle it out for the receiving job. A 
freshman battery with Paul Billett heav- 
ing and Bill Masimer catching shows 
signs of power and may develop into a 
strong combination before the season 
rolls around. 

Williams, who is a fine fielder and bat- 
ted around the .300 mark last year, will 
have no competition in retaining his job 
as first baseman. Boran, classy second 
baseman who hit .318 last season, will 
again guard the keystone sack, with 
Charlie Rust protecting the shortstop's 
territory. Rust was last year's leading 
batsman, corking the apple at a neat .356 
clip. 

"Dutch" Arndt seems to have the edge 
on the other candidates for the third-base 
position. Whiting, an outfielder last year, 
may be switched to the infield to guard 
the hot corner, and "Pat" Patrizio is also 
a third-base prospect. 

In the outfield, "Hooks" will probably 
use two of the third-base candidates, 
along with "Butch" Barthold, high-scor- 
ing forward of the crack 1933-'34 basket- 
ball team. 

In addition to the six league games 
on the schedule, five non-league games 
have been booked. The two battles with 
Albright promise to be two of the high 
spots of an interesting campaign. The 
first skirmish with our traditional rivals 
will be a feature of the May Day cele- 
bration, while the second will bring down 
the curtain on the season. The complete 
schedule is as follows, "X" denoting the 
league games: 

x Friday, April 27— Ursinus at College- 
ville. 

Saturday, April 28— Susquehanna at 
Annville. 

xTuesday, May 1— Juniata at Annville. 
Saturday, May 5— Albright at Annville. 
xWednesday, May 9— Bucknell at Ann- 
ville. 

xSaturday, May 12— Gettysburg at Get- 
tysburg. 

xFriday, May 18— Drexcl at Annville. 
Saturday, May 19— Susquehanna at Se- 
1 ins grove. 

Tuesday, May 22— Bucknell at Lewis- 
burg. 

Wednesday, May 23— Penn State at 
State College. 
xSaturday, May 26— Albright at Read- 
ing. 



Conservatory Faculty 
Makes Bow In York 



Several members of the Conservatory 
faculty presented a recital for the inter- 
denominational meeting of ministers in 
York, Pa. The program was a very un- 
usual and varied one. 

Holiday in Sicily Yon 

Eklog Kramer 

Sonata Romantica (first movement) ..Yon 
R. Porter Campbell, organ 

Indian Lament Dvorak-Kreisler 

Valse Coquette White 

Midnight Bells Henberger-Kreisler 

From the Canebrake Samuel Gardner 

Harold Malsh, violin 

The Two Grenadiers Schumann 

The Floral Dance K. Moss 

The Blind Ploughman Clarke 

Alexander Crawford, voice 
Prize Song — from Sie Meistersinger 

Wagner 

E. P. Rutledge, cornet 
Jesus, Joy of Man's Desiring 

Bach-Hess 

Rigoletto — Paraphrase Verdi-Liszt 

Nella Miller, piano 
Accompanist, Ruth Engle Bender 



HAY FEVER BEFORE 
AND AFTER 



Before the curtain went up for the 
Kalo-Delphian presentation of "Hay 
Fever," Dr. Stonecipher led a very in- 
spired invocation. He was followed by 
the presidents of the societies who gave a 
hearty welcome to the audience in behalf 
of their respective societies. Delphian 
was represented by Gem Gemmill, while 
Kalo's welcome was extended by Presi- 
dent George Klitch. This arrangement 
of dual invitations is a new policy on our 
campus, due to joint society plays, but it 
worked very smoothly. 

After the play a gay group of stu- 
dents, alumni and guests filled the bright- 
ly decorated alumni gymnasium for Kalo- 
Delphian reception. On their entrance 
they were greeted by the soft lilting 
strains of "I Love You Truly," played 
by Jack Todd and his College Ramblers. 

The floor was soon filled by couples 
dancing to the music, although many pre- 
ferred to be spectators rather then par- 
ticipants. Refreshments were served be- 
tween dance groups. 

The evening was brought to a success- 
ful close by the orchestra's theme song 
and the curtain rolls down for another 
year upon this dual anniversary play and 
reception. 




A THREE-MINUTE THRILL 

For 35 Cents! 

Here's a thrill to liven the dullest evening 
— telephone Home. A chat with the Family 
is just like seeing them. It's a pleasure for 
them as it is for you. 

Call them tonight. After 8:30 P.M. 
(Standard Time) go to a telephone and give 
the Operator the number. Then "hold the 
line" . . . it's as easy as it's inexpensive. 

The cost — if your home is within 100 
miles — is only 35 cents for a three-minute 
talk. For further distances and longer con- 
versations, the rates are proportionately low. 



a/i 



FOR LOWEST COST 



icays hi: ME MICE It . . 



FIRST: The low Night Rates are ef- 
fective after 8:30 P.M. Standard 
Time (9:30 P.M. Daylight Sav- 
ing Time). 

SECOND: Night Rates apply only on Sta- 
tion to Station calls — that is, on 
calls for a telephone, but not for 
a specific person. 

THIRD: Make a "date" to telephone 
home regularly once a week. 
Then the folks will be waiting 
for your call and you'll not waste 
any of the 3-minute talking 
period. 



I Hi: BELL TELEPHONE COMPANY OF PENNSYLVANIA 




M — 7 



I 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 12, 1934 



Modern Drama 
Is Discussed At 
Readers' Meeting 

MODERN PLAYS REVIEWED 



Mowrey, Shellenberger, Straub, 
Shearer and Gemmill Give 
Special Reports 



AID JUNIORS 

ATTEND HOP 



Modern drama was the topic of the 
April meeting of Readers' Club. Miriam 
Book took charge of this program on 
Monday the 9th, at Dr. Wallace's home. 
Quite a few types of dramatists and their 
plays were discussed by the group. 

Kathryn Mowrey first presented a 
sketch of Shaw and his thoroughly mod- 
ern play, "Too True to be Good." Eu- 
gene O'Neill was the next dramatist con- 
sidered. Edward Shellenberger reviewed 
"Emperor Jones," O'Neill's haunting Ne- 
gro drama. The club members, having 
so recently been in contact with Noel 
Coward through the production of "Hay 
Fever" on our campus, then discussed 
him and his work. Louis Straub told of 
"Post Mortem" which is one of Coward's 
more serious plays. It is the story of a 
wounded World War soldier, who in his 
delirium visits the past-war world, thir- 
teen years after the war. A different as- 
pect of O'Neill's work was given by 
Louise Shearer, who described to the 
club the play "Ah Wilderness." This 
is a drama of modern youth, and it is 
much more natural than most plays by 
this author. Gem Gemmill then dis- 
cussed "The Barretts of Wimpole 
Street"^— the well-known play which 
gives us intimate pictures of the lives of 
Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett. 

In addition to the program, there was 
an important business meeting. Most im- 
portant of all was the election of new 
officers. Edward Shellenberger is the 
new president of Readers' Club. Catha- 
rine Wagner was chosen vice-president, 
and Theodore Loose was chosen secre- 
tary-treasurer. Plans for a trip to a play 
in Harrisburg next month were taken up, 
and a committee appointed to take care 
of the details. The club meeting then ad- 
journed with the members anticipating 
this theatre trip and a possible May meet- 
ing in charge of its new leaders. 



COURT ENTERTAINMENT 

THEME FOR MAY DAY 



(Continued from Page One) 



dances follow in order. At the conclu- 
sion of the last dance the conqueror is 
given his choice of the slave girls. The 
empress, in the meantime has fallen in 
love with the conqueror and invites him 
to share her throne. When the victor 
rejects the offer, the empress becomes en- 
raged and stabs her offender. 

The queen and court acknowledge the 
talent of the entertainers and a merry re- 
lessional brings the pageant to a close. 

Officers of the sponsoring organiza- 
tions—the Y. M. C. A. and the Y. W. C. 
A.— are well pleased with the progress to 
date and predict a fine production. 



Arbor Day Rehearsal 

The most recent addition to the col- 
lection of trees and shrubs on the 
campus was made last week when a 
lime tree was planted on the grounds 
at the rear of the library. This tree 
was presented by Miss Hilda Buckley 
'32 and her mother, Mrs. Norman 
Buckley. The tree is eighteen years 
old and has been growing since it was 
very young in the yard of the Buck- 
ley home in Allentown. For some 
years the tree has been blooming and 
bearing regularly. Since the variety 
is quite an unusual one in this local- 
ity Lebanon Valley is quite fortunate 
to receive the gift. 



At a recent meeting of the Junior class 
President Lloyd definitely decided upon 
Saturday evening, March 14, as the 
opening date for a series of junior-spon 
sored dances. A committee was placed 
in charge of the details^consisting of 
Anne Butterwick, chairlady, assisted by 
Clyde Magee, Frances Holtzman, Allen 
Steffy, Elizabeth Carl, Mary March and 
William Gerber and they are busily en- 
gaged in preparations for this occasion 

A renowned orchestra is to furnish 
the music, and refreshments will be sold 
during the evening, but do not expect to 
hear Guy Lombardo or Caso Loma this 
week as the juniors are saving the best 
for last. 

Prices are indeed reasonable, rock bot- 
tom level if you please, fifteen cents 
apiece or twenty-five cents if you pick 
up nough courage to bring along a date. 



CUPID'S DARTS TAKE 

HEAVY TOLL OF ALUMNI 



(Continued from Page One) 



offspring of inter-married alumni is two 
per family. Of this number 53 per cent 
are boys and 47 per cent girls. Perhaps 
sociology had been offered as far back 
as 1900. 

In comparing these figures with those 
of Pennsylvania and the United States, 
an exceptionally good report was found. 
One out of every 50 persons in the 
United States and one out of every 79 in 
Pennsylvania marry, as compared to one 
out of every eight among Lebanon Val- 
ley alumni who inter-marry. Another 
victory for L. V.! 

Last, but not, by any means, the most- 
insignificant, the report disclosed the fact 
that one out of every 5.88 marriages in 
the United States presents its climax in 
the divorce courts, one out of every 8.06 
in Pennsylvania, and one out of every 
10 in New Jersey. The percentage 
among Lebanon Valley graduates again 
surpassed the others with one out of eve- 
ry 55 marriages resulting in divorce, 
proving that this college is a staunch 
friend of cupid and his theory of never- 
dying romance. 



Publishers Promise 
1935 Quittapahilla 
For May Day Sale 

ASSURE UNIQUE ANNUAL 



Manager and Editor of Publica- 
tion Make Statements 
To La Vie 



PLANS FOR JUNIOR PROM 
SOON TO BE ANNOUNCED 



(Continued from Page One) 



sidered. The committee wrote to a few 
of the leading orchestras in this part of 
the country. The secretary has written 
to the managers of Sam Tracy's, Vincent 
Traver's, Harold Knight, Scotch High- 
landers, Al Hollander's, and Al Mervine's 
orchestras. All of these bands offer ex- 
cellent, snappy programs with spectacu- 
lar feature numbers, and plenty of hot 
music. Make sure you leave the date, 
May 11, 1934, open to come to Lebanon 
Valley's spring formal. The Scotch 
Highlanders under the direction of Ty 
LeRoy broadcast from WKBO each 
Thursday afternoon at 5:30 P. M. Four 
members of the committee listened to and 
watched this band broadcast their pro- 
gram from the Penn Harris hotel. The 
committee will also attend the broadcast- 
ing of Sam Tracy's orchestra c\ Friday 
at 3:30 P. M. at the WHP broadcasting 
station in Harrisburg. 

Elections for prom leader will take 
place in the future. Each class will elect 
a member of the Junior class as its own 
nominee for prom leader. Of the four 
nominees, the leader will be elected dur- 
ing a chapel period. 



The appearance of the 1935 "Quittie" 
on our campus by May Day seems to be 
an assured fact. Editor Palatini revealed 
in an exclusive interview that all copy 
for the book is now in the hands of the 
publishers. He pointed out that this is 
ahead of schedule. 

The staff has worked hard on this 
year's book and from all reports and tips 
from those "in the know" it should be a 
success. The opening section is now on 
the presses of the Du Bois Printing Com- 
pany of Rochester, New York. The fact 
that this firm which prints the "Lucky 
Bag" of Annapolis, "The Howitzer" of 
West Point, and many other famous 
books is doing the Quittie should guar- 
antee the student body a well made-up 
book. 

Several class representatives have seen 
samples of the photography which will 
appear on its pages. The editor con- 
firmed the report that all the photogra- 
phy done by the Apeda Studio is of the 
same excellent quality. 

The business staff also seemed opti- 
mistic and divulged some interesting 
news. Charles Hauck, the business man- 
ager, reports that photography sales have 
reached, as far as he can determine, an 
all time high for Lebanon Valley. Fur- 
thermore, the amount of advertising 
space sold slightly tops that sold in the 
nore recent books. 

With this encouraging news from the 
staff there have been several hints that 
the "Quittie" has been radically changed 
in many details. We look forward to a 
publication which will be a unique and 
fitting monument to this year of college 
life and the Junior class. 



Only Campus Concert 
Of College Warblers 

The one and only home concert of 
L. V. C. Glee Club will be given 
April 17 at 8 P. M. The soloists will 
be Matilda Bonanni, Martha Elser, 
Dale Roth, Earl Linger and Ruth Bai- 
ley, who will initiate the new piano— 
a concert Steinway grand. 

General admission will be 25 cents, 
student admission 15 cents. Tickets 
may be secured from members of the 
Glee Club or at the box office on the 
evening of the concert. Come and 
enjoy our bigger and better Glee Club. 



Prof: "Algire, what would you sug- 
gest to bring back prosperity?" 

McFaul: "The horse, sir. Bring back 
the horse and the country will be sta- 
bilized." 



SANDWICHES SODAS 

EAT AT ROEMIG'S 

DELICIOUS HOME-MADE 
ICE CREAM 



FLOWERS 

FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

BERNSTEIN'S 

LEBANON, PENNA. 



i I 

c! 



Doutr 




E Always Reliable L : ,-— 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 



HEATH TASTES 

MARRIED BLISS 



The Lebanon Valley College matri- 
monial list for 1934 is getting well under 
way. Bob Heath is the latest proud bride- 
groom. The wedding took place at the 
bride's home near Reading, Saturday, 
March 31. The date, we discovered, had 
been planned last fall. 

Mrs. Heath was formerly Miss Sarah 
Rahn and is a senior in the library sci- 
ence department of Simmons College, 
Boston, Massachusetts. The bride has 
been student manager and student in- 
structor of archery for the last three 
years. 

Here's luck to you, Bob, and may she 
never have to make use of that good 
aim, which she probably has! 



First Spring Recital 
Violin Quartet Appears 

The first of the spring recitals was giv- 
en April 12 in the Engle Conservatory. 
Ethel Keller, pianist; Nancy Bowman, 
soprano, and the violin quartet consist- 
ing of Martha Elser, Oleta Dietrick, Rus- 
sell Hatz and Harold Malsh were fea- 
tured on this program. 

The dates for the remaining recitals to 
be given this season are: April 19, 24, 
26; May 8, 10, 14, 15, and the 17th when 
Miss Nella Miller will be the artist. 



ASTCE 



ANNVILLE, 



'''•:v\A. 



THURSDAY 

Joan Blondell - Guy Kibbee 
Dick Powell 



CONVENTION CITY 



FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 

CAROLINA 

WITH 

Lionel Barrymore - Janet Gay nor 



MONDAY AND TUESDAY 
Richard Barthemes 

IN 

MASSACRE 



BEST SHORT ATTRACTIONS 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

AtitPTEAOO. 

C. H. SHEARER, Mgr. 



'And you don't know anything about 
religion?" queried the new missionary. 

"Well, we got a little taste of it when 
the last missionary was here." replied 
the cannibal chieftain. 



J. E. GIPPLE 
Fire Insurance and Real Estate 

1251 Market Street 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



KREAMER BROS. 



EASY ELECTRIC WASHERS 
GAS STOVES AND RANGES 
RUGS AND LINOLEUMS 
PICTURE FRAMING 



Furniture - - Undertaking 



Phone 14 4 ANNVILLE, PA. 



SPECIAL CARDS 
SPECIAL STATIONERY 
and a SPECIAL WELCOME 
. . . at . . . 

BOLLMAN'S 

Book and Stationery Store 

628 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 



GRIMM'S BOOK STORE 

SPECIAL 
CROWN SET 
CLIONIAN PINS--&12.00 



FOR QUALITY 

Baked Products 

PATRONIZE 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



SEE OUR LINE OF 

MEN S SPORT AND DRESS 
SHOES FOR EASTER 

JOHN IIIKSCH DEPT. STORE 
ANNVILLE PENNA. 



D. L. Saylor & Sons 
CONTRACTORS 

LUMBER and COAL 
Annville, Pennsylvania 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. BASHORE 



LEBANON. PENNSYLVANIA 



A COMPLETE LINE OF 

EASTER CANDIES AND NOVELTIES 
AT REASONABLE PRICES 
THE PENNWAY 



Good Concert 
Glee Club 



laf it Call^iennt 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Attend the 
Prom 



VOL. XI 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 1934 



No. 2 



Juniors Hold 
Exclusive Dance 
For Small Group 



BlJTTERWICK CHAIRLADY 



jack Todd and the College 
Ramblers Furnish Lively 
Syncopation 



"Vas you dare, Charlie?" The Junior 
Class came through again by holding a 
dance in the Alumni gymnasium. On 
Saturday evening, -April 14, the gym 
was the scene of the first of a series of 
dances to be sponsored by the Junior 
Class. 

The dancing began to the melodious 
strains of "I Love You Truly," played 
by Jack Todd's College Ramblers' with 
the Edwards brothers as a feature. The 
orchestra played the latest and most 
popular hits with plenty of close har- 
mony. Everyone missed "The Man on 
the Flying Trapeze." Shadel "tickled" 
the ivories, while Bryan did the push and 
pull exercises on the trombone. Gerber 
gave a spectacular performance with his 
cornet and derby, Allen Buzzell with 
the black derby around his ears helped 
his roommate along by offering a bit of 
humorous entertainment on the side lines. 

The crowd was overwhelming. There 
was enough room to dance comfortably, 
in fact, very comfortably. This was one 
dance at which the men's trouser cuffs 
were entirely out of danger, and every 
one was able to retain his good humor 
throughout the evening. There was no 
interference from the elbow diggers and 
shin-scrapers. The gym was very nice 
and cozy with its popular dim lights for 
they are so much easier on one's com- 
plexion than a glaring chandelier. Did 
the two spectators in the balcony have 
to pay admission? The faithful stags 
went to town dancing together. 

The redeeming feature of the whole 
affair was the refreshments. The class is 
certainly* indebted to the refreshment 
committee for the financial success of the 
evening. "Bebe" Carl is to be congratu- 
lated for the delicious sandwiches, espe- 
cially the Kraft cheese sandwiches which 
ou ght to have been called graft cheese 
from the taste and appearance. The re- 
freshment committee filled their duties 
Ve *7 responsibly. It was impossible to 

(Continued on Page 4, Column 2) 



W - S ; G. A, HOLDS 
NOVEL PARTY 
FOR MRS. GREEN 

A surprise birthday party was given 

u Grecn by the w - s - G - A - in 

° rt i Hall on Tuesday night after the 
concert Ti i 
incl 6 WCre out ninct Y guests 

<■ ud lng the student mem bers and fac- 

y advisers of the W. S. G. A. 

had Vaded a " d rath ° r novel P r °9 ram 
c ^ een Panned. Selections were sung 

Kath ayle Mountz and Charlotte Stabley. 
Ann^n 6 Mowre y 9 ave a reading, Rae 
Harh er played a corn£> t solo, Lois 

duet t GraC ° Nau9 ' e pla V ed a 

R ° tneir own improvisation, and 
T dieter tap-danced. 

Which 9UeStS 3te in the dining room ' 
Was attractively decorated in 

agio 



gr een ' ''inactively decorated in 
"'glow yellow - A Iar 9 e birthday cake 
te r Qf Wlth H ghted candles was the cen- 
* traction. Strawberry mousse, 



cake, Sa i tlon - Sfawberry mousse, 
^rved' nUtS ' co ^ ee and cocoa were 



Committee Reports 

On Junior From 



The Junior Prom committee is right on 
its toes this year. They have been in- 
terviewing orchestra managers and at- 
tending broadcasts of the most popular 
bands around here. On Friday afternoon 
four members of this committee, Cathe- 
rine Wagner, "Dutch" Arndt, Howard 
Lloyd and Galen Baugher, went to Har- 
risburg to witness the broadcast of Sam 
Tracy's orchestra. This band broadcasts 
every Friday afternoon at 3:00 P. M. 
from WHP in the Telegraph building. 
The orchestra consists of fourteen men. 
They feature "Ruthie" Miller and "Gin- 
ny" Doyle as vocalists. Friday evening 
Sam Tracy played at a sorority dance 
at Bucknell. The band is good-looking, 
the music is smooth with plenty of har- 
mony, but the biggest attraction for most 
males is their feature. 

However, matters were brought to a 
head at a meeting of the assembled com- 
mittee Monday noon when Ty Leroy and 
his Scotch Highlanders were definitely 
cho.' en to play for the spring formal. 

(Continued on Page 4, Column 2) 



Character Building 
Green Blotter Theme 



NEW INK SPOT INITIATED 



Starring- Hall, Schaak, Straub, 
Bigler, Hiltner, Mentzer, Ossi, 
Palatini and Kreider 



At the last meeting of the Green Blot- 
ter Club a new member, Miriam Eich- 
ner, was entered into the rank of an 
ink-spot by being chosen to fill the place 
left vacant for a freshman girl since the 
beginning of the year. 

The meeting, a very interesting one, 
was based on the study of character 
building, about which Ida K. Hall re- 
ported with library research work. Vari- 
ous character sketches were presented. 
The first one was on a fictitious charac- 
ter given by Elizabeth Schaak, Louis 
Straub presented an interesting paper, a 
last letter of a suicide, which depicted 
the mental stress and strain the man suf- 
fered during his last few minutes. Then 
in a monologue of an old drunken vil- 
lager, Adam Bigler offered a scene por- 
traying the characteristics of a drunkard. 
George Hiltner's character sketch in- 
cluded a description of a friendly and 
likable gossiping wash-woman. Clyde 
Mentzer enlarged on a quotation from 
"Everyman." Marietta Ossi gave an in- 
teresting collection of riming words, de- 
picting an incident. A well-written de- 

( Continued on Page 2, Column 4) 



Congrats, Umberger 

Edmund Umberger, prominent se- 
nior, has recently been honored by 
being awarded a full university schol- 
arship to Johns Hopkins University 
at Baltimore. 

The scholarship is one of ten grant- 
ed annually by the Maryland gradu- 
ate school, and the selection was made 
from a group of five hundred appli- 
cants. It must then be recognized that 
the honor is a merited one and speaks 
highly for the mathematical scholar- 
ship of former "Chief" Umberger. In 
fall he will matriculate at the gradu- 
ate school to specialize in mathematics 
and mathematical physics, 



Federal Emergency 
Relief Act Aids 
Local Students 



CAMPUS IS BEAUTIFIED 



Six Types of Work Offered, 
Manifold Benefits 
Derived 



The inauguration of the Federal Emer- 
gency Relief Administration has afforded 
financial aid to many Lebanon Valley 
students as evidenced in the fact that, 
during the past two months a number 
have been busy cleaning and beautifying 
the campus, giving clerical aid to the 
faculty, and holding special tutoring 
classes. This activity has been carried 
on under the division "part time jobs for 
college students'" of the Federal Emer- 
j.ncy Relief Act. 

The work thus afforded to the stu- 
dents on our campus is of six types: 
clerical, typographic, research, tutorial, 
janitorial, and care of the grounds and 
buildings. The books and shelves in the 
library are being completely gone over 
and cleaned, members of the faculty are 
receiving aid in research and tutorial 
work, shrubbery and trees are being 
planted and pruned, musical instruments 
in the conservatory are being repaired 
and cleaned, and the tennis courts are 
being cared for. All this is being done 
by students, aided by the Federal Emer- 
gency Relief. 

The benefits derived therefrom are 
manifold: deserving students are receiv- 
irj) financial aid to continue their educa- 
tion, the faculty are being relieved of 
many of their smaller but essential du- 
ties, delinquent students are receiving 
rpecial aid from tutors and assistants, 
and the campus in general is being made 
more attractive. 



Barthold Elected 
Basketball Captain 
For 1934-35 Squad 

VARSITY VETERANS ELECT 



Also Letter Man In Football 
And Baseball 



Stewart "Butch" Barthold, one of the 
mainstays of the L. V. C. basketball 
team for the past two seasons, was elect- 
ed captain of the court squad for the 
1934-35, season at a meeting of the var- 
sity men last Saturday. 

The captain-elect was the team's high 
scorer this season and was second in in- 
dividual scoring for the Eastern Pennsyl- 
vania Collegiate League, trailing Sam Ja- 
cobs, the bespectacled F. and M. star, 
by several points. 

Barthold, who hails from Shillington, 
is a letter man in football and baseball 
as well as in basketball. He played at a 
halfback post last fall and is at present 
patrolling the outfield for Coach "Hooks" 
Mylin's last L. V. C. nine. 

"Butch" will succeed Max Light to the 
captaincy. Light, diminutive guard, and 
Russ Williams, substitute guard and for- 
ward, will be the only basketeers to 
graduate in June, leaving a wealth of 
material for Emerson "Chief" Metoxen 
to work with next year. Lettermen Bar- 
thold, Charlie Rust. Paul Miller, Bill 
Rose, Bill Smith and Pat Patrizio will be 
at hand for next year's five, which should 
prove to be a championship combination. 



Catalogue Changes 

Noted By Students 

New catalogues are now in circula- 
tion and the students are eagerly or 
anxiously, as the case may be, looking 
through them for possible changes. 

First of all is the important change in 
tuition. Next year a charge of $50 will 
cover tuition and a fee for student ac- 
tivities. The latter includes use of the 
library, gymnasium and athletic field; 
admission to all athletic games, subscrip- 
tions to the newspaper and year book, 
membership in the Christian Association 
and student government associations, and 
use of the infirmary and care by the resi- 
dent nurse. There is no matriculation fee 
except one of $5 for those entering school 
for the first time. 

There is also a slight change in re- 
quirements for degrees. Six hours of his- 
tory, exclusive of History 16, are now 
required for the degree B. S. in Science. 
For the A. B. and B. S. in Education de- 
grees, the field of history has also been 
broadened. Instead of courses 26 or 46 
the requirement now is any 6 hours ex- 
clusive of History 16. 



Elaborate Costumes 
For May Day 

"Y" PRESIDENTS RUSHED 



Dazzling Array To Be Pre- 
sented Before Eager 
On-lookers 



Under the supervision of the Costumes 
Committee, consisting of Chairman Sara 
Lupton, Rebecca Adams, Helen Grusko, 
Mildred Nye, Romaine Stiles, Helen 
Summy and Ruth Gayne, the annual 
May Day will be made a brilliant dis- 
play of flashing gay costumes. 

Louis Straub, a Freshman, who has 
been cho.;en as the hero or conqueror in 
the one-act ballet entitled "The Con- 
queror" which will be presented to the 
May queen and her court, will be dressed 
in leopard skins. The following students 
who will take part in the dance of "The 
Wrestling to Death of the Pagan Pri- 
soners" will likewise be attired in leopard 
skins: Guy Beaver, Curvin Thompson, 
John Brosious, George Holtzman and 
Howard Reber. 

Miss Mildred Kenyon, head of the 
women's physical education department, 
will play the part of the pagan empress. 
She will be dressed in a sweeping gown, 
adorned with many jewels, colorful head- 
dress, girdle and scarf, and made com- 
plete by a gorgeous fan^an excellent 

(Continued on Page 4, Column 1) 



Lucky Friday the 13th 

To the extreme delight of all those 
who attended chapel Friday, April 13, 
a most enjoyable program was pre- 
sented. 

Stuart Goodman, one of L. V.'s 
special students, lived up to his title 
in his excellent presentation of two 
vocal solos, both of which are great 
favorites— "Until" and "The Hills of 
Home." 

The second feature was a trumpet 
solo, "Rock of Ages," played by Earl 
linger, who handled his instrument in 
a skillful and well-polished manner. 

Both performers were accompanied 
by Ruth Bailey who likewise is a stu- 
dent of no mean talent. 



Alumni Groups 
Are Busy With 
Spring Sessions 

SCHOLARSHIP DISCUSSION 



Drs. Lynch, Grimm and Shenk 
Representatives at Baltimore 
Reading and Pittsburgh 



The president, certain faculty mem- 
bers and their wives served as guests at 
business and social sessions of the Pitts- 
burgh, Baltimore and the newly-organ- 
ized Reading alumni clubs during the 
past several days. All of these meetings 
were well attended by an ardent group 
of former^Lebanon Valley students who, 
motivated by visitors from their former 
alma mater, rejuvenated days crowded 
with pleasant memories and filled the oc- 
casion with a typical college spirit. 

The first of these sessions, held at the 
Iris Club in Wyomissing, was an or- 
ganization meeting of the Reading and 
vicinity alumni, and President Lynch 
and Professor Shenk served as guests 
from the college. The main speaker of 
the evening was Dr. Lynch. Among 
others called upon to speak were Dr. 
George F. Bierman, retired teacher of 
class of 78, and Mr. Landis Klinger, '13, 
principal of Reading Junior High School. 
The officers elected to lead the club dur- 
ing the next year were: President, Mr. 
William N. Martin, '18, former instruc- 
tor in Annville Academy and assistant in 
Biology to Prof. Derickson; secretary, 
Mrs. Meta Burbeck Bauer, '22; treasurer, 
Miss Olga Smith, '25. Professor J. Les- 
ter Appenzeller, '08, supervising princi- 
pal of Wyomissing schools, acted .s 
toastmaster. During the business session 
it was resolved that steps should be tak- 
en toward the raising of a fund for a 
scholarship. The group also decided 
that they would attend the annual May 
Day program in a body. 

On Friday the thirteenth, Professors 
Grimm and Shenk together with Mrs. 
Grimm and Mrs. Shenk journeyed to 
Baltimore to attend the annual dinner 
and business session of the Baltimore 
Alumni Club. A delicious meal was 
served at a prominent apartment house, 
and after this affair the group gathered 
at the home of Mr. Harold T. Lutz, 
23 for a short business meeting which 

(Continued on Page 3, Column 4) 



DESTINY OF 

4 FROSH BIBLE' 
DECIDED UPON 

The destiny of next year's "Freshman 
IV 1c" was decided at a joint meeting of 
the "Y" cabinets in North hall parlor on 
April 12. Warren (Barney) Mentzer 
was chosen editor with Lena Cockshott 
assisting him as associate editor. The 
business end of the publication is in the 
hands of Kenneth Sheaffer, whose offi- 
cial title is advertising manager. 

The editorial staff plans to do their 
work during the summer vacation while 
the advertising staff must complete its 
work this semester. The new editor was 
reluctant about giving out information, 
but the reporter succeeded in getting him 
to admit several probabilities. The cover 
for the new book wili be all white with 
a large blue "L" in the center. In size it 
will closely follow previous editions in 
containing about 150 pages between 
pocket size covers. 

(Continued on Page 3, Column 3) 



I 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, T HURSDAY, APRIL 19, 1934 



Ha Viz Collegtenne 

ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Under 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Helen Earnest, '35 Editor-in-Chief 

George Hiltner, '35 Associate Editor 

Richard Baus, '37 Managing Editor 

David Yake, '36 Asst. Man. Editor 

RE PORTO RIAL STAFF 

Catherine Wagner, '35 
Sylvia Evelev, '36 
Louise Gillan, '36 
Lester Krone, '36 
Marian Leisey, '36 
Maxine Earley, '37 

Grace Naugle, '37 General Reporters 

Ida K. Hall, '35 Conservatory 

William Earnest, '37 Athletics 

Miriam Eichner, '37 Alumni 

Louis Straub, '37 Philokosmian 

Charles Hauck, '35 Kalozetean 

Jane Shellenberger, '36 Clionian 

Marietta Ossi, '35 Delphian 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Kenneth Sheaffer, '35. .Business Manager 
C. Edward Arndt, '35. Asst. Bus. Manager 
Robert Cassel, '36. . .Circulation Manager 
Elwood Needy, *37....Asst. C ir. Manager 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 

Single Copies 5 cents 

Subscription $1-00 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter, under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 1934 



CAMPUS MUD 



On hearing the familiar cry, "Do you 
know any new dirt?" it gives the desired 
cue for the sudden and whole-hearted 
opening of confidences. Incidents, stories 
and nasty gossip may be exchanged in 
the course of the conversation. What 
with the advent of beautiful spring and 
the numerous topics of interest— May 
Day— the Prom— approaching vacation 
—graduation— could not some part of 
this unkind chatter be eliminated? If only 
individuals— male and female— could be 
induced to count ten before they voice 
their personal opinions of another. If 
they would only stop to consider the 
possible harm which they might bring 
about not only to the opposing indivi- 
dual but upon themselves as well. It is 
not an altogether pleasant sensation to 
find yourself quoted weeks or months af- 
ter a statement has been made, and then 
find it so utterly distorted from the in- 
tended meaning that you are caused an- 
noyance as well as embarrassment. Still 
more deplorable is one's condition when 
accused out of a clear blue sky of some 
slander which the individual himself has 
had nothing to do with spreading. 

Keeping in mind then, Dr. Lynch's 
plea of several weeks ago— let us all 
join in a spring house-cleaning to free 
our brains from the spider webs and 
moldy corruption which taints the mind 
with so many prejudiced and nasty 
thoughts. Try for one day at least to do 
your part in refraining from any silly 
chatter or idle gossip— make your con- 
versation worth listening to— or as the 
only alternative, remain quiet. "Silence 
is golden" and of much value, even 
though we arc no longer on the gold 
standard. 



Apologies, Kalo 



A request was made for the correc- 
tion of a statement in last week's issue 
of La Vie Collegienne. Upon investi- 
gation it is discovered to be a repor- 
torial error in the article on Kalo's 
anniversary dinner dance. The state- 
ment to be revised should indicate that 
dancing continued until 11:45, instead 
of the former statement of 12:30. 



Derickson, Light 
Honored at Meeting 



ACADEMY OF SCIENCE 



President and Assistant Secre- 
tary to This Group of Penn- 
sylvania Scientists 



Lebanon Valley can well be proud of 
her faculty. The student body has 
brought to realize this still more by the 
honors so recently conferred upon the 
two members of our biology department. 
At the last meeting of the Pennsylvania 
Academy of Science, Dr. Derickson, the 
head of our biology department, was 
elected president. Dr. Light was named 
as assistant secretary of the academy. 

The academy is composed of the scien- 
tific leaders of the state and meets period- 
ically to present reports and papers of 
importance to the scientific world. Dr. 
Derickson and Dr. Light have been very 
active members of this body. Dr. Light 
has been a member of the program com- 
mittee during the past year. Congratu- 
lations, "profs". 



Other Colleges 

Dr. Albert D. Menuet of Syracuse 
University has just uncovered a surpris- 
ing situation of the past. In the middle 
of the twelfth century at the University 
of Bologna, students were given the pow- 
er to hire and fire professors, fix their 
salaries, go to classes as they pleased,- 
and change professors at will. This sys- 
tem, however, was not successful. The 
students took advantage of their privi- 
leges and wandered about from place to 
place in dissoluteness and inmorality, be- 
coming nothing but vagrant loafers. This 
is an important argument for those op- 
posed to complete student government. 



Lafayette College will make it possible 
for a student to walk in the college li- 
brary, get a phonograph record of his 
favorite opera, take it to a sound-proof 
room and follow it with a score after 
having studied its background in one of 
the 130 volumes of music at his com- 
mand. 

This was brought about by a gift from 
President Lewis of 824 records of operas, 
250 scores of operas, the volumes on 
music, and an electric phonograph. He 
said that college students do not get 
enough cultural advantages and when 
they leave college they know nothing of 
fine books, beautiful printing, or good 
music. 



Twenty-five unidentified Biblical-Tal- 
mudic narratives, lost since the tenth 
century, have been brought to light and 
published by the Yale University Press 
in a unique Arabic codex in ancient 
manuscript form, edited by Dr. J. J. 
Obermann, visiting professor of Semitic 
languages at Yale University. 

The achievement is considered one of 
the outstanding literary feats of the cen- 
tury, and is the first treatise to reveal the 
full share of Arab-Mohammedan civili- 
zation in the making of medieval Juda- 
ism. 



Amherst's students have varied dra- 
matic tastes. "Hamlet" will soon be of- 
fered, followed by "Sauce for the Gan- 
der," a musical revue. Both will have 
unusual features; in Hamlet, the setting 
and costumes will be those of the origi- 
nal twelfth-century Denmark. In the 
musical comedy there will be cellophane 
settings with ultra-modern "torch" songs 
and novelty dances. 



A cry, "strike against war," resounded 
on many campuses last Friday, summon- 
ing students to drop books and demon- 
strate for peace. Even before the move- 
ment got officially under way it resulted 



in bruises for about ^0 persons. 

A riot launched the peace drive in 
Biooklyn Thursday pight. About 500 
students of an evening high school joined 
2,000 other persons in trying to persuade 
1,500 remaining students to join their 
ranks. 

There was a melee, in which police 
swung night sticks and demonstrators 
;,wung fists and feet. After the wild tur- 
moil was over, two policemen were treat- 
ed for sprains and bruises, and a citi- 
zen for scalp wounds. Many others 
limped away before the ambulance sur- 
geons could get to them. Eight persons 
were arrested. 

Detectives said known reds led some 
of the groups of rioters. 

The anti-war movement, described as 
nation-wide, gave authorities of many 
colleges some anxious moments, for they 
feared other clashes. 

One hundred students met in New 
York under the banner of the student 
anti-war week to plan meetings. They 
said they were from Columbia, New 
York University, Hunter College, City 
College, Brooklyn College and other in- 
stitutions. The call for the "strike" in 
New York and elsewhere went out from 
the student league for industrial Democ- 
racy and the national student league. 

Dean Morton D. Gottshall of City Col- 
lege warned that students cutting classes 
would suffer the usual penalties. The. 
acting dean at Columbia College said he 
would remain neutral. 

Girls at Smith College decided on an 
evening meeting instead. Under-gradu- 
ates at Johns Hopkins called for a strike. 
At Springfield College in Massachusetts* 
24 white crosses dotted the lawn as an. 
anti-war protest. 

The students at Haverford, Pa., Col- 
lege were at war over peace. One group 
sent word to President Roosevelt that it 
would not fight "in any war." Another 
said it would "uphold the good judgment 
,)f the government" in case of war. 



Conserv Dance At 
Leb. Country Club 

LEBANON COUNTRY CLUB 



Slaybaugh, Ely, Early, Heck- 
man, Bonanni, Hall, Sanders 
Active Committee Heads 



ALUMNI NOTES 



The Rev. Russell F. Showers, general 
secretary of the Home Mission and 
Church Erection Society of the United 
Brethren Church, died April 14 at the 
Mayo Sanitarium in Rochester, Minn., 
where he had undergone an operation. 
Mr. Showers attended Lebanon Valley 
College, Philomath College and Bone- 
brake Seminary. He was superintend- 
ent of the Erie Conference for ten years. 



During the past week or so there have 
been several meetings of the alumni of 
L. V. C. These have included the Balti- 
more alumni and the Pittsburgh alumni 
associations which met April 13, and the 
Berks County Alumni Association. 



Miss Helen Groh of the class of 1932 
has been elected to teach Latin at Chris- 
tiand. Miss Groh will receive the M. A. 
degree from the University of Pennsyl- 
vania in June. 



Miss Kathryn Leisey of the class of 
1933 has been elected to teach Latin at 
Landisville. 



ADMINISTRATION NOTES 



April 21— Dr. Lynch will speak at 
the annual convention of the Lebanon 
County Sunday School Association 
which is to be held on Saturday eve- 
ning at the Palmyra Reformed Church 
at 7:30 o'clock. His theme for the 
evening will be "A Working Faith." 

April 22— In the morning Dr. 
Lynch will preach at the Harrisburg 
United Brethren Church; while in the 
evening he will speak at the Franklin 
Street Memorial United Brethren 
Church in Baltimore. 

April 24— Dr. Lynch will attend a 
special meeting of the Association of 
American Colleges to be held at the 
Bellevue-Stratford hotel in Philadel- 
phia. 



Why have the music students been 
wearing such beaming smiles lately? The 
secret is out; finally, the conserv stu- 
dents have "gotten together," and on 
Friday evening they are holding their 
first formal dance at the Lebanon Coun- 
try Club. If the dance is successful, 
which we are sure it will be, the con- 
servatory is planning to make it an an- 
nual event for conservatory alumni, stu- 
dents and their guests. One of our own 
conserv students, Jack Schuler, and his 
orchestra will furnish swaying rhythm 
tunes from 8:00 till 11:45. 

Various committees have been ap- 
pointed and every thing is ready for the 
big event. The committee chairmen are: 
Dick Slaybaugh, transportation; Dot 
Ely, music; Peg Early, dance hall; Cath- 
erine Heckman, program; Sandy Hall, 
decoration, and Adelaide Sanders, re- 
freshments. 

Both faculty members and students are 
anxiously awaiting the dance and hop- 
ing that it will become an annual event. 




Lady: Is that a real bloodhound, !v ir 
Hunter? 

Prof. G: A real bloodhound? I'll , say 
Here, Joe, bleed f^*. the lady. 

Mary: First letter in a month. Bu' 
I'll show him, I won't answer it until 
after supper. 



"It's the little things that tell," saii 
Minna as she dragged her kid brother 
From under the sofa. 



Clio Business Session 



Clio held a brief but entertaining meet- 
ing in the hall last Friday evening. The 
president, Miss Miriam Book, presided 
at the business session. The society de- 
cided to again augment the collection of 
furniture with card tables, chromium 
lamps and a screen. The president ap- 
pointed four new ushers: Eleanor Lynch, 
Marjorie Smith, Grace Naugle and Sara 
Meckley, to care for the hall and usher 
at meetings. 

Louise Gillan and Thelma McCreary 
gave a clever first number on the pro- 
gram. In their own pleasing manner 
they harmonized in two familiar songs, 
"Show Me the Way to Go Home" and 
"Good Night, Ladies." Next, Selma 
Grim presented an entertaining reading, 
"If Two Miles After Kipling." Finally, 
Lavinia Cassedy skillfully played a piano 
selection, "Etude Fantastique" by Rudolf 
Friml. 



Breakfast Hike For 

Clio Early Birds 



Clio is introducing something novel in 
the way of entertainment when on Sat- 
urday morning the members will hold a 
breakfast hike. The destination has been 
kept a secret, but it is supposed some 
spot along the "Quittie" has been cho- 
sen. The committee on arrangements is 
composed of Margaret Longenecker and 
Anne Matula. The menu is to include 
cocoa, fruit, rolls and steak with onions. 
Katherine Louise Witmer, Rebecca Ad- 
ams and Anna Francis are providing 
these. The guests of the society at the 
hike are to be Mrs. Reynolds, Mrs. 
Stonecipher, Miss Myers, Mrs. Light and 
Miss Moyer. Local alumnae members 
are also to be invited. 



CHARACTER BUILDING 
GREEN BLOTTER THEME 



[Continued from Page One 



scription of the thoughts of two men 
under diverse circumstances was given 
by Henry Palatini in narrative style. 
Two poems, including a nursery rhyme, 
were read by Sandy Hall, while Martha 
Kreider read a poem showing how well 
Queen Victoria liked to mingle witli the 
commoners. The critic of the evening 
was Bernard Stevens. After a business 
session, delicious refreshments were 
served by the hostess, Mrs. Struble 



It's a wonderful thing for women 
This popular permanent wave. 
Now it's up to some struggling 

inventor 
To get out a permanent shave. 



Prospective Student: Do you get three 
square meals a day up here? 

Schwartz: Naw, we get waffles for 
breakfast. 



Bob: See that drum? My grandfather 
used it in the Revolutionary War." 

Max: Yes, and I suppose he beat it 
when he saw the enemy. 



Dick: Who spilled the mustard on 
this waffle, dear? 

Peg: Oh. Dick! How could you? This 
is lemon pie!" 



Cullather: I can stand having hash 
every day in the week, but when yy.i 
put raisins in it and serve it on Sunday 
as mince pie. I quit. 



Morgan chased the train to the end 
of the platform but failed to catch it. As 

he walked back, mopping his brow, an 
interested onlooker sighed and looked at 
him. 

Onlooker: "Miss the train?" 
Morgan: "Oh, not much. You see, I 
never got to know it very well." 



The drunk got in the cab. "Where 
to?" asked the cabby. 

"What streets you got?" was the re- 
ply. 

"Plenty," smiled the humoring cabby. 
"Gimme them all." 

After several hours' driving the drur.K 
asked how much he owed. 

"Seven dollars and fifty cents," he was 
told. 

"Turn around and drive back to thir- 
ty-five cents," he mumbled. 



Mr. Hoover: "Lady, won't you pleas* 
buy a magazine? I'm working my boy $ 
way through college." 



Pete: I call my girl erosion 'cause she 
wears me down. 



Kirk: "Je t' adore." 

Louise: "Aw, shut it yourself.' 



Zierdt: "Did you meet Elly at anV 
of the dances?" 

Pete: "Elly, who?" 
Zierdt: "Elevator." 
(Editor's note: Oh, migud!) 



The old-fashioned girl blushed wltf' 1 
she was ashamed. 

The modern maid is ashamed whe° 
she blushes. 



Wallace: Miss McAdams, use *■ 
word "digress" in a sentence. ^ 

Kotty: Digress is growin' greener a 
the time." 



Sam: "Yes, I'm a big shot at schoO 
now." 

Mr. Harnish: "Then let me have 
better reports from you." 



King Kong: "How come you W' ite 
slowly?" 

Guy Allen: "Gotta. My girl can't M 
very fast." 



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I 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 1934 



PAGE THREE 



SPORT SHOTS 

Albright College officials have con- 
cn ted to change the date of the annual 
Lotball battle with L. V. C. from No- 
' jober 24 to November 17 for the 1934 
on _ This change will give the foot- 
v H squad an open date on the Saturday 

'receding Thanksgiving and will give 
Lm time to prepare for the Turkey Day 
, lrU ggle with P. M. C. Two other re- 

. ra ngements were necessitated by this 
advantageous shift. The one required 
' vaS the changing of the date of the Juni- 
ata 9 ame * rom November 17 to Novem- 
ber 3, and the other was the changing 
f the scene of battle of the Albright- 
k V. fracas from the Bethlehem Steel 
field, Lebanon, to the Albright stadium 
at Reading. 



Waynesboro Scene 

> For Frosh Week-end 



Manager Nye likewise ran into a few 
snags in arranging a tennis schedule. 
For example, Friday, May 4, the team 
will take its longest trip of the year^ 
t0 Juniata— and the next morning will 
play Gettysburg on the L. V. courts as 
one of the features of May Day. Never- 
theless, "Hib" is to be congratulated not 
only on the quantity but also on the 
quality of the matches he has successfully 
negotiated. He has prepared one of the 
best schedules since L. V. stepped into 
the world of tennis. Let's hope Jupiter 
Pluvius doesn't wreck it. 



Edward "Eggs" Schanbacher, Leba- 
non Hash, has been crowned ping-pong 
champion of Lebanon Valley College. 
In the finals of the tournament held re- 
cently, Schanbacher was victorious over 
"Willy" Fishburn in four out of five 
games played. The finals were played 
without the benefits (or detriments) of 
much ballyhooing and cheering, but judg- 
ing from the scores the competition must 
have been keen and the players in top 
lorm. Fishburn was able to win only 
the third game, and that by a 22-20 score. 
However, the newly-crowned king of 
swat was forced to the limit to win each 
and every point and won out only after 
an exciting duel. 



And now we see a poster announcing 
the pairings for a hand ball tourney! At 
the rate that tournaments are now spring- 
>ng up, we may well foresee the time 
when each and every L. V. student will 
have some title to his name. Think of 
the thrill your great grandchildren will 
9 e t when they become marble champions 
or bull-dozing experts or examination- 
unking champions at your alma mater. 



Miss Kenyon must be preparing the 
BU-ls for a trip around the world. From 
'"glish Badminton, she has now turned 
instructing her classes in the seafar- 
ers ^vorite- Deck Tennis. We only 
°P e that the girls will at least learn how 
P keep the miniature inner tube on the 
ec k rather than in the ocean. 



T he Y. M. C. A. cabinet did a good 

|JJ of renovating the "Y" rooms. With 

^ er ything now in good shape, it would 

We U for us to take a bit of pride in 

d Ppearance of the rooms and try to 

e P thi, :gs in order so that L. V. will 
really k 

y ive rooms which can be truth- 
'y refp 

er ''e:l to as a recreation center. 

t nan n0t ^ er mat ter of sportsmanship rather 
c n c SPOrts is that of observing the "sev- 
W e ° mrnandrnents for tennis enthusiasts." 
c 0ope ^ lyht a dd that the whole-hearted 

Sou ght CUl ° n ° f non " cntnusiasts is a l so 
in t | )e ' Those who are really interested 

r ul es . 9nme are not so apt to break the 

Well./ lr ° t ' losc w ho care nothing for 

C °u nc ii Pt C ° UrtS and nCtS ' The Athletic 
frorr, S ^ building notice was far 

tic n t n ^f 9 When if called to our atten- 
tive f , att 'hat our tennis courts are 

^tiieiri RneSt ' n thc east Wo rciter " 
'° k(, e p r tl ° 9ital conclusion— it's up to us 
le m in good condition. 



North Hall lost about one fourth of 
its residents and practically all of its 
noise when Miss Martha Faust and her 
friends left for a week-end party at Miss 
Faust's home. The group included: Ruth 
Buck, Eleanor Engle, Maxine Earley, 
Lois Harbold, Jean Harnish, Eleanor 
Lynch, Sara Katharine Meckley, Gayle 
Mountz, Grace Naugle and Virginia 
Summers. Miss Helen Benedict of 
Waynesboro, a student of Wilson Col- 
lege, and Miss Virginia Wyand of 
Waynesboro also attended the party. 

The girls motored to Waynesboro Sat- 
urday morning and arrived at the Faust 
home for dinner. They spent most of 
the afternoon shopping and sight-seeing 
in the town. 

In the evening Miss Virginia Sum- 
mers, who is also from Waynesboro, en- 
tertained the group at a buffet supper in 
her home. There was dancing and sing- 
ing afterwards. The girls decided to 
drive to Chambersburg to the movies, 
but on arriving they found "standing 
room only." They preferred to shop in 
town and then return to Faust's where a 
midnight luncheon had been prepared 
for them. After a great deal of fun that 
crept into the wee hours and a great deal 
of trouble in quieting certain of the nois- 
iest ones, the group proceeded to snatch 
a few hours of what sleep they could get. 

The entire party attended the First 
United Brethren Church of Waynesboro 
Sunday morning where Miss Gayle 
Mountz sang a solo. 

Dinner was served at a large farm 
house just outside of Waynesboro. It 
was a real country dinner to which not 
even Lebanon Valley appetites could 
prove themselves equal. After dinner the 
group visited the United Brethren or- 
phanage at Quincy, and Ruth Buck, 
Gayle Mountz, Lois Harbold and Grace 
Naugle gave a musical program. The 
girls also sang some of the college songs 
which the children seemed especially to 
enjoy. 

Mr. Fred Lehman and Mr. Robert 
Cassel were also guests of Fausts on 
Sunday. 

A tired but happy group drove out of 
Waynesboro Sunday afternoon all agree- 
ing that they had had one grand time. 



Spring Recital Held 
In the Conservatory 

THREE SOLOISTS STAR 

Heckman, Reeder and Schuler 
Are Participants 

Another of those lovely spring reci- 
tals was presented on Thursday evening. 
With only three soloists the program 
seemed short, but it was very interest- 
ing. 

Sonataquasi una Fantasia Beethoven 

(Opus 27, No. 1) 
Catherine Heckman, piano 

My Laddie Thayer 

Wings of Night Winter-Watts 

Elnora Reeder, soprano 

Meditation— from Thais J. Massemcr 

Jack Schuler, violin 

Fairy Tales Bemis-Wilson 

Come to the Fair E. Martin 

Elnora Reeder, soprano 

Pies La Mer Arensky 

The Brownies Korngold 

Etude Heroique Leschetizky 

Catherine Heckman 
Ruth Bailey, Nancy Bowman, accom- 
panists 

The next recitals will be April 24 with 
Oleta Dietrich, violin; Elizabeth Binga- 
man. Cordelia Shaeffer, piano; Dorothy 
Ely* organ; and Stuart Goodman, tenor. 
The following evening Irma Keiffer, 
Nancy Bowman, piano; Gayle Mountz. 
soprano; Helen Butterwick, violin; and 
Cyrus Smith, oboe, will appear in a re- 
cital. 



7 Commandments 
For Tennis Courts 



15 (JAMES are scheduled 



Coach Stevenson Has Good 
Turn Out For Can- 
didates 



Eighteen men answered Coach E. H. 
Stevenson's call for tennis candidates. 
Of these eighteen, ten are freshmen and 
eight, including the four veterans— Wal- 
born, Lehman, Ax and Nye— are upper- 
classmen. 

Inclement weather has kept the rac- 
queteers from holding regular workouts, 
but in the few practise sets played, the 
boys seemed to be in mid-season form 
and are on their toes for their opening 
match next Monday. 

It is not known who the six men to 
represent Lebanon Valley against Eliza- 
bethtown shall be. "Wib" Shroyer, Jack 
Glenn, "Red" Hitz and Galen Baugher 
are the upperclass candidates for the va- 
cant posts on the squad. Little is known 
of the freshman material, with the ex- 
ception of Homer Donmoyer, brother of 
Lebanon Valley's stellar Claude Don- 
moyer, who looks like a first-class pros- 
pect. 

The college athletic council has set up 
the following rules to be observed re- 
garding the tennis courts: 

1 . Until the tennis team is selected, the 
two middle courts are reserved for var- 
sity practise beginning at 3:30 P. M. 

2. All players will wear white clothes 
at all times. 

3. Nothing but flat-soled rubber shoes 
will be worn, by both genders. 

4. When courts are crowded, give the 
waiting players a chance. Play doubles. 

5. After a rain, keep off courts until 
caretaker O. K.'s it. 

6. Last players off the courts kindly 
let down the nets. 

7. The courts are for students, teach- 
ers and families, only. 

The complete schedule has been an- 
nounced by Manager Nye and includes 
nine matches at home and six away from 
home. It is as follows: 

Monday, April 23 — Elizabethtown— 
Home. 

Wednesday, April 25— Gettysburg— 
Away. 

Friday, April 27 — Brooklyn College- 
Home. 

Saturday, April 28— St. Joseph — 
Home. 

Wednesday, May 2 — Dickinson- 
Home. 

Friday, May 4— Juniata — Away. 

Saturday, May 5— Gettysburg — Home. 

Thursday, May 10 — Juniata, — Home. 

Friday, May 11— St. Joseph— Away. 

Tuesday, May 15— Bonebrake Semi- 
nary — Home. 

Wednesday, May 23 — Elizabethtown 
— Away. 

Thursday, M a y 24 — Moravian — 
Away. 

Friday, May 25— Albright — Away. 
Wednesday, May 30 — Albright— 
I tome. 

Saturday, June 2 — Alumni — Home. 



DESTINY OF FROSH 

KIBLE DECIDED UPON 



(Continued from Page One 



Editorially it will be revised and 
brought up to date with the introduction 
of new view cuts and re-writes. The 
staff has already begun to look for new 
avenues of approach to their subject. 

Though the contract has not been let 
Out at the time of this writing, Indica 
tions seem to point to the Webb Print- 
ing Company of Gettysburg as the prob- 
able printer. No matter who prints the 
book the student body can be confident 
of the competence of the staff. The 
Freshman Handbook of Lebanon Valley 
will be a worthy representative of our 
college. 



Prayer Meetings 

In Swing Again 



The student prayer meetings have been 
resumed again. Under the charming lead- 
ership of Francis Keiser, co-chairman, the 
meeting was very interesting and inspir- 
ing. After a brief piano prelude by Ruth 
Goyne, Margaret Kohler led the group 
in devotions. Rae Anna Reber sang a 
solo, "Just for Today." The speaker for 
the evening was Alma Cline. She dis- 
cussed the value of prayer and of a 
prayer life on the college campus. The 
meeting ended with the prayer circle. 



ALUMNI GROUPS BUSY 

WITH SPRING SESSIONS 



(Continued from Page One) 



was followed by an evening of pleasant 
social recreation. Miss Esta Wareheim, 
'16, president of the club, was in charge. 
This group also decided to raise funds 
for a scholarship so that the Baltimore 
alumni may feel as though it is serving 
its alma mater in a fruitful manner. The 
main speaker of the evening was Prof. 
S. O. Grimm. Dr. H. H. Shenk, alumni 
field secretary, also spoke. The program 
following the business session included 



a vocal solo by Hilda Colt Jackowick, 
'17, reading by Miss Maybelle Adams, 
a former member of the college faculty, 
and a performance of magic by Robert 
Tilford, son of Grace Lowery Tilford, 
'09. 

The Pittsburgh alumni meeting, at 
which Dr. Lynch represented the col- 
lege, was held on Saturday, April 14, at 
Webster hall near the Cathedral of 
Learning with twenty-two members pres- 
ent. A dinner was held in connection 
with the meeting. The address of the 
afternoon, delivered by Dr. Lynch, was 
on the present status of the college and 
the plans that are being made for the 
future. The speaker also suggested a 
scholarship project by which the alumni 
group may assist the college in a more 
concrete manner by helping to send a 
student to school. The group decided 
to hold two meetings throughout the 
year, one in the fall and one in the 
spring. Rev. C. C. Gohn, '02, pastor of 
the United Brethren Church at Greens- 
burg, Pa., was elected vice-president of 
the club. Other officers previously elect- 
ed are: President, Mr. John I. Cretzin- 
ger; secretary, Nancy Margaret Miller, 
Ph.D., '16, instructor in Latin at Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh. 




A THREE-MINUTE THRILL 

For 35 Cents! 

H ere's a thrill to liven the dullest evening 
— telephone Home. A chat with the Family 
is just like seeing them. It's a pleasure for 
them as it is for you. 

Call them tonight. After 8:30 P.M. 
(Standard Time) go to a telephone and give 
the Operator the number. Then "hold the 
line" . . . it's as easy as it's inexpensive. 

The cost — if your home is within 100 
miles — is only 35 cents for a three-minute 
talk. For further distances and longer con- 
versations, the rates are proportionately low. 



aL 



FOR LOWEST COST 



ways HEM EM HER 



FIRST : The low Night Rates are ef- 
fective after 8:30 P.M. Standard 
Time (9:30 P.M. Daylight Sav- 
ing Time). 

SECOND: Night Rates apply only on Sta- 
tion to Station ealls— that is, on 
calls for a telephone, but not for 
a specific person. 

THIRD: Make a "date" to telephone 
home regularly once a week. 
Then the folks will be waiting 
for your call and you'll not waste 
any of the 3-minute talking 
period. 



l lll BBIX I I I I I' IIO >K I O >l I* \ .M OF PENNSYLVANIA 




M— 7 



I 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 1934 



ELABORATE COSTUMES 

FOR MAY DAY 



(Continued from Page One) 



imitation of the Queen of Sheba's outfit. 

Dazzling armors and swords will be 
the main features of the Roman soldier 
outfits which will be worn by the sol- 
diers, among whom are Paul Billett, John 
Houtz and John Speg. 

The costumes of the slave drivers^ 
Kenneth Eastland and Elwood Needy— 
and the jailers— Charles Kinney and 
William Masimer, have not as yet been 
decided. The participants of the "Ball 
Dance" likewise do not have a definite 
costume planned up to the present time. 
This dance will be given by some of 
the outstanding girl athletes of L. V., as 
Marjorie Smith, Charlotte Weirick, Iva 
Claire Weirick, Kathryn Mowrey, Ma- 
bel Chamberlin, Geraldine Harkins, Lois 
Miller, Anna Orth, Hazel March and 
Anna Matula. 

"The Chariot Dance" will bring into 
prominence the gorgeous apparel of the 
ancient Greeks. Charlotte Stabley and 
Eleanor Reder, as chariot drivers, will 
wear Grecian costumes consisting of 
short tunic, gay toga, and high-laced 
sandals. The following girls who will 
play the role of horses will be dressed in 
either white or black outfits: Virginia 
Summers, Jane Showers, Nancy Bow- 
man, Rae Anna Reber, Oleta Dietrick, 
Irma Keiffer, Helen Summy and Ruth 
Goyne. 

Christine Smith, Virginia Britton, Aa 
na Mary Erdman, Martha Faust, Marian 
Leisey, Louvain Roberts, Lois Harbold 
and Winona Shroff will wear vivid green 
costumes that typified the ancient Greek 
dancers in their dance of "The Archers." 

The "Slave Dance" will probably be 
one of the most resplendent, due to its 
large cast and multi-colored costumes. 
Estelle Delgado and Mary Margaret 
Brace will be the two solo slave dancers. 
They will wear individualistic outfits 
suited for the Persian ballet and attract- 
ing the attention of all because of their 
showy hues, flowing sleeves, sparkling 
ornaments, and feathered and jewelled 
headdress. The group of slave dancers 
will be garbed in Persian costumes of 
long full trousers of all the colors of the 
rainbow, red girdles, cretonne jackets, 
bright turbans, curtain ear rings, and as 
many bracelets and necklaces as they 
desire. The girls who will be in this 
elaborate dance are: Louise Bishop, 
Ruth Bright, Evelyn Frick, Dorothy 
Grimm, Mary Webb, Claire Adams, Ro- 
maine Stiles, Ida Belle Smith, Cordelia 
Shaeffer, Sara Meckley, Sara Light, Ed- 
na Binkley, Esther Koppenhaver, Miri- 
am Eichner, Jean Bitting, Grace Naugle, 
Gayle Mountz, Ruth Buck, Eleanor En- 
gle, Maxine Earley, Thelma Denlinger, 
Louise Hoffman, Mary Batz, Elizabeth 
Bingaman, Jean Harnish, Ferne Layser, 
Eleanor Lynch, Reta Sholley, Pauline 
Yeager, Sylvia Evelev, June Gingrich, 
Anna Mary Herr, Catherine Deisher, La- 
vinia Cassedy, Anna Francis, Pauline 
Snavely, Martha Elser and Louise 
Shearer. 

The traditional May Pole dance in 
which seventeen couples of the junior 
class will participate will feature fluffy, 
ruffly organdies of all shades and pat- 
terns and white flannels with dark coats. 
The members of the junior class who 
will take part are: Rebecca Adams, Al- 
lan Steffy, Haidee Blubaugh, Paul Mil- 
ler, Anna Butterwick, Henry Grimm, 
Elizabeth Carl, Clyde Magee, Alma 
Cline, Wendell King, Lena Cockshott, 
Ted Long, Merle Deaven, Richard Ax, 
Rose Dieter, Galen Baugher, Helen Ear- 
nest, C. Edward Arndt, Helen Grusko, 
Pete Kanoff, Ida Hall, David Evans, 
Sarah Heilman, Lester Ross, Francis 
Holtzman, Mike Kanoff, Mary March, 
Edward Shellenberger, Sara McAdam, 
Morgan Edwards, Catherine Wagner, 
Howard Lloyd, Margaret Weaver and 
Lester Lingle. 



Home Appearance 

Campus Songsters 

After hearing so many compliments on 
the L. V. C. Glee Club, we were more 
than pleased to attend their home con- 
cert on Tuesday night. There we learned 
that the things which had been said are 
really true— we do have an unusually 
fine Glee Club; they do present unique 
and varied programs. 

Salutation Gaines 

The Snow Elgar 

(with Obligato for two violins) 
Martha Elser, Russell Hatz 

The Bells of Notre Dame Klemm 

Glee Club 

Das Meer (By the Sea) Schubert 

A Banjo Song Homer 

Dale Roth, tenor 

Rigoletto Parophrase Verdi-Liszt 

Ruth Bailey, piano 

O Bone Jesu Palestrina 

Sing We and Chant It Morley 

Ay, Ay, Ay (Alas) ....Creole Folk Song 

Go Down Moses Negro Folk Song 

Glee Club 

Parle (Speak) ._' Arditi 

Matilda Bonanni, soprano 

Cavatina Raff 

Martha Elser, violin 

Halleluia, Amen Handel 

Sylvia Speaks 

Italian Street Song Herbert 

Glee Club 
The c4ub not only has quantity but 
also quality. The fine artistic interpre- 
tation is the result of many rehearsals. 
Professor Rutledge is to be congratu- 
lated on the fine work that he has done 
with the group this year, and we hope 
that next year he and the club will be 
equally successful. 



Dr. Funk Delivers 
Cancer Message 
At Chapel Period 

PROMPT TREATMENT PLEA 



Painless Symptoms — Operation 
And Radiation Only Known 
Cures Uptodate 



JUNIORS HOLD DANCE 

FOR SMALL GROUP 



(Continued from Page One J 



bargain with them, even for the tempting 
sandwiches. 

The chaperones enjoyed themselves 
around the bridge table. The Junior class 
wishes to thank Dr." and Mrs. Alvin 
Stonecipher and Dr. and Mrs. George 
Struble for chaperoning the dance. The 
success of the evening is the result of 
the careful planning and work of the 
dance committee of which Anne Butter- 
wick is chairman. 



COMITTEE REPORTS 

ON JUNIOR PROM 



(Continued from Page One' 



Campus opinion seems to favor this band 
highly, and as practically the entire com- 
mittee wanted this group the final deci- 
sion was not a surprising result. Bids on 
programs are being secured at various 
printing ^stablishments, and the price for 
the dance will soon be announced. Keep 
May 1 I absolutely free from any en- 
gagements except the Junior Prom. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

Starting next week and continuing for 
the remainder of the year, a new col- 
umn, Ink Spot, will 
This column will be 
Green Blotter Club. 



appear in LaViE. 
sponsored by the 



H. W. MILLER 

Hardware of Quality 

ANNV1LLE, PA. 



Dr. Funk, member of the cancer com- 
mission of the Medical Society of Penn- 
sylvania and chief of health education 
of the State Department of Health, ad- 
dressed the student body in chapel Tues- 
day morning on the subject ' Cancer." 

The lecturer first explained that of late 
the attention of the general public has 
been focused on cancer, first, because of 
new advances and applications of medi- 
cal knowledge, second, because of the 
commercial exploitation of the "health" 
racket. He showed further that while 
cancer is a dangerous and somewhat 
mysterious disease, killing 120,000 peo- 
ple in the United States and Canada 
each year (one out of 36 deaths from 
all causes), still tens of thousands are 
cured of it in the United States today 
and hysterical fear concerning the dis- 
ease is foolish. Three fourths of those 
applying for medical examination fear- 
ing they have cancer are found to be 
without a trace of the disease; of the re- 
maining fourth a good percentage se- 
cures immediate and permanent cure 
through prompt, adequate medical atten- 
tion. 

As an example to bring hope to those 
senselessly afraid of the disease the ex- 
ample of President Grover Cleveland 
was used. President Cleveland contract- 
ed cancer of the mouth, was operated 
upon, and recovered from the disease 
without the general public learning of it. 
Furthermore, he lived fifteen more years 
to the ripe age of seventy and did not 
che of cancer. 

On the other hand, Dr. Funk explained 
that many people foolishly disregard 
signs of the disease such as chronic sores 
or lumps and thus delay medical atten- 
tion, reducing their chances of cure many 
times. Usually there is no pain warning 
or no conscious health impairment in the 
early stages. The doctor urged a peri- 
odic health examination for ail people, 
especially for those above the age of 
forty. 

The rest of the lecture was concerned 
with a more detailed description of can- 
cerous growths, of the types of growths, 
their transmission and causes, and their 
treatment. The fact that cancer is not a 
contagious disease was heavily stressed. 

In closing, Dr. Funk expressed the 
sentiment that if his talk should play a 
part in preventing one death from can- 
cer he would feel amply repaid. 



An atheist is got one point beyond 
the devil. 

Bees that have honey in their mouths 
have stings in their tails. 

Each bird loves to hear himself sing. 



Steve Wornas 

Hoffman Steam Pressing 
Keystone Hat Cleaning 

lO WEST MAIN STREET 
ANN VILLE. PA. 



Doutr 




E} Always Reliable ^ 



Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 



Philo Society Holds 

Business Session 



The Philokosmian Literary Society 
held a meeting Thursday at 1 P. M. for 
the purpose of dealing with a few mat- 
ters of importance. In the absence of 
President Umberger, Vice President Ger- 
ber took charge. Various items of rou- 
tine business were discussed and disposed 
of. The club then deliberated upon the 
advisability of purchasing new window 
blinds (curtains, as De Witt called 
them) for the Philo hall. Ray Johnson, 
Philo anniversary president, gave a 
searching report upon the activities of 
the various committees under his charge, 
and pointed out that everything was 
coming along in commendable style. 
Then, after discussing some plans for the 
future benefit of the club, two applicants 
for membership were given the first de- 
gree. 



A Few Books Every 
Student Should 
Have— 



Modern Word Finder $1.00 

Roget's Thesaurus 1.00 

Crabbe's Synonyms 1.00 

Book of American Poetry 1.00 

Standard Book of British and 

American Poetry 1.50 

Oxford Book of American 

Verse 1.00 

Complete Poems of Keats 

and Shelley 1.00 

World's Best Poems 1.00 

World's Best Loved Poems.... 1.00 

BOLLMAN'S 

628 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 



J. E. GIPPLE 
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1251 Market Street 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



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MEN'S FLANNEL SLACKS. ...$2.9c 
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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Twelfth Night 



VOL. XI 



ANNVILLE PENNSYLVANIA THURSDAY APRIL 26, 1934 



No. 



Entertainment By 
Music Department 
At Annual Festival 



GRIEG PIANO CONCERTO 

College Band, Orchestra And 
Soloists To Feature In 
Program 



The college band, orchestra, and solo- 
ists have spent much time in preparing 
one of the finest programs of the year, 
that of the annual Music Festival, which 
will be given Friday afternoon and eve- 
ning in the chapel. 

The Little Symphony concert will be- 
gin at 4:00 o'clock Friday afternoon. Its 
program will include a suite by Gluck, 
and numbers by Mozart, Saint Saens, 
and Tschakoff. The feature of the con- 
cert will be a Grieg piano concerto in 
three movements, which will be played 
hy Miss Ruth Bailey, accompanied by 
the orchestra. The composition displays 
excellently her fine tone work as well as 
her technical ability. The orchestra this 
year has better instrumentation than 
ever, and the audience will notice a de- 
cided improvement. 

The band will feature in its concert, 
which beings at 8:00 o'clock, the well- 
known sextette from "Lucia de Lamer- 
moor" by Donizetti, played by Messrs. 
Unger and Gerber, cornets; Roth, bari- 
tone; Bryan, Fauber, and Rader, trom- 
bones. Miss Matilda Bonanni, soprano, 
and Mr. Earl Unger, cornet, will be the 
soloists, accompanied by the band. The 
band will play "Hungarian Fantasia" by 
Tobani, a colorful number built on tune- 
ful Hungarian folk melodies, and "Evo- 
•ution of Dixie" by M. Lake. This lat- 
ter selection depicts the gradual evolu- 
f 'on of the well-known song in an inter- 
esting manner. First, we hear its crea- 
"on, next it becomes an aboriginal dance; 



then 



a minuet. The melody is further 



developed until there emerges the 
(Continued on Page 3, Column 1) 



MISS MYERS 
LOCAL DELEGATE 

Miss Myers attended the meeting of 
e State Library Association, which 
Was held at the Library Extension Divi- 
Sl °n of the State Library in Harrisburg 
° n Tuesday, April 1 7. The topic for dis- 
^ Us sion was "How the Economic Con- 
10ns Effect the Library," the prob- 
ms of the local libraries being consid- 
ered ^d discussed. 
Mr n • 

of p ■ u "ver of the State Department 
Comb p. ation - w ho knew James Whit- 
that Y personall y' g av e a talk on 
w 0rk POet - Driver said that the poet's 
p eopl S e reveal ^e life peculiar to Riley's 

^ork 8 t AcC ° rding to the s P eaker - the 
Riley should not be read as the 



stud 



LU aent s f 

hut * « locution would read them 



H 0osi V e so f hat the spirit of the 
People might be revealed, 
here v» 

Nation 7 3S 3n interestin 9- artistic ex- 
tiade f° Wllat won derful use might be 
Vere ill pl *ane. Children's stories 

T h e p ie ^ S p ated in this shiny material. 
c hildr en r ' With crowds of running 

Co '°rf„i , a rat was portrayed in 
T he 1 Cell °phane. 

f'^sC^'" 9 eUded With an informal 
of the representatives' prob- 



Guest Flute Soloist 

On Chapel Program 

Regardless of the inevitable fact that 
Lebanon Valley is a small town col- 
lege, it certainly is evident that it does 
not have small town talent, presented 
either by its own performers or by its 
guests. It seems that all the prominent 
speakers and musicians of the day just 
can't pass through Annville without stop- 
ping at L. V. 

The school was greatly honored by 
the presence of Mr. Eric Evans, instruc- 
tor of the flute in Harrisburg as well as a 
flutist of the Harrisburg Symphony Or- 
chestra. He was formerly a member of 
John Philip Sousa's incomparable band 
and for two years he played with Victor 
Herbert, two distinctions which rate him 
very high in his musical field. 

Mr. Evans played several numbers 
that were greatly enjoyed by all— Bric- 
cialdi's "The Wind," Bizet's "Minuet," 
Titl's "Serenade," and Krantz's "The 
Whirlwind." Every selection brought 
out his marvelous skill and the probable 
reasons why he has been a member of 
Sousa's band. 

Miss Ruth Bailey contributed further 
to the success of the program by means 
of her excellent accompaniment. 



Smashing Victory 
For Tennis Artists 



DONMOYER PLAYS NO. 1 



Coach Stevenson Presents Weil- 
Balanced Outfit In Open- 
ing Match 



With the loss of only one set in eight 
matches, the Lebanon Valley College 
varsity tennis team auspicuously opened 
its 1 Q 34 campaign with a sweep'ng vic- 
tory over Elizabethtown College on the 
horiie courts. 

Hosier Donmoyer, freshman flash 
playing in No. 1 position, displayed the 
most br^liant tennis of the day in de- 
feating his E-town opponent, Sherrick, 
in two fast sets, 6-1, 6-1. "Hib" Nye, 
No. 2 man, lost the opening s?t to Zuck, 
6-4, bul came back strong to bear his 
man. 4-6. 6-3, 6-2. Fred Lehman. Valley 
No. 3, hkewise improved as his match 
with C.iNsel progressed, winning the sec- 
ond set 6-2, after being forced to the 
limit to annex the first, 7-5. Walborn, 
L. V. No. 4, defeated McDonall in a 
tight match, 6-4, 6-3. Hollinger of 
(Continued on Page 4, Column 3) 



Helen Lane Closing 

Delphian President 

Delphian Literary Society elected its 
officers for the third term on March 28. 
Helen Lane was elected to be the closing 
president for this year. The new officers 
will be sworn into office at the next reg- 
ular Delphian meeting. The retiring of- 
ficers arc: Gem Gemmill, president; 
Dorothy Jackson, vice-president; Mari- 
etta Ossi, recording secretary; Helen 
Grusko, corresponding secretary; Louise 
Bishop, chaplain; Ida Hall, critic; Char- 
lotte Stabley, pianist. The new officers 
are: Helen Lane, president; Esther Smel- 
ler, vice-president; Mary March, record- 
ing secretary; Catherine Wagner, corre- 
sponding secretary; Verna Grissinger, 
critic; Jean Bitting, pianist; Lois Miller, 
chaplain; Ida B. Smith and Claire Ad- 
ams, wardens. 



Hedgerow Players 
Perform at Hershey 
Community Theatre 

JASPER DEETER DIRECTOR 



"Twelfth Night" Enthusiasti- 
cally Viewed By College 
Representatives 



The Hedgerow Theatre which pre- 
sented Shakespeare's farce, "Twelfth 
Night," on April 25 at the Hershey thea- 
tre, is one of the extremely unique or- 
ganizations of its kind in America. Its 
director, Jasper Deeter, who incidentally 
is its founder, is a Harrisburg boy who 
carried out the old myth "and made good 
in the big city." He was director of the 
famous Provincetown theatre, which 
brought to light the genius of Eugene 
O'Neill, Susan Glaspell, Edna St. Vin- 
cent Millay, and other dramatists of our 
century. The Hedgerow Theatre is the 
largest active repertory company in 
America. Its repertory consists of one 
hundred and three plays, that is it will 
consist of 103 when it presents Lennox 
Robinson's Irish farce, "Is Life Worth 
Living?" on May 21 in celebration of 
its 11th birthday. Over thirty-five plays 
are represented on the yearly bill of this 
theatre, plays of all nationalities and 
races. Many famous dramas received 
their world premiere at the Rose Valley 
playhouse of this organization, which is 
a converted grist mill in the suburbs of 
Philadelphia. 

Deeter along with a company of ac- 
tors which included Ann Harding, 
formed the present Hedgerow in 1923 
when they became dissatisfied with the 
New York stage. They felt that they 
should have liberty to develop plays on 
a repertory basis, that is the present 
presentation of a different play each 
night on a rotating scheme. This gives 
the actor a chance to develop his char- 
acterization over an extended period, to 
(Continued on Page 3, Column 4) 



'Conserv' On Jump, 
Recitals - Concerts 

BIGLERVILLE LAST STOP 



Six Days of Music Festivities 



The conservatory has been very busy 
this week. Monday evening the Glee 
Club gave a concert in Lebanon at the 
Masonic hall. The soloists were Matilda 
Bonanni, Martha Elser, Dale Roth, and 
Earl Linger. 

Tuesday evening Dorothy Ely, organ; 
Oleta Dietrich, violin; Elizabeth Binga- 
man, Cordelia Shaeffer, piano; and Stu- 
art Goodman, tenor, presented a very 
pleasing student recital. 

Another recital was given on Wednes- 
day evening with Gayle Mountz, Irma 
Keiffer, Nancy Bowman, Cyrus Smith, 
and Helen Butterwick as soloists. These 
student recitals are gaining in popularity 
and at each recital the audience grows 
larger. 

The Glee Club gave their second 
bioadcast of this season on Thursday 
owning from WHP in Harrisburg. 

The big music festival will be held on 
Friday— the band concert at 4:30 and 
the orchestra concert at 8:00 o'clock. 

The Glee Club will bring this week 
of music activities to a close on Sunday 
evening when they will give a concert 
at Biglerville, Pennsylvania. 



6 Weeks Soviet Course 
At Moscow University 

The All-Union Soviet of Students, 
whose headquarters are in Moscow, ad- 
dressed an official invitation to Ameri- 
can students to attend a special inter- 
national session of the Moscow Univer- 
sity summer school, beginning July 21. 
The invitation was sent to the Institute 
of International Education, New York 
City. The summer school, under the 
auspices of the Anglo-American Insti- 
tute of the First Moscow University, 
will last six weeks. Lectures and in- 
struction will be in English, and will be 
given by a faculty of the foremost Soviet 
professors and specialists. 

In the United States, the venture is 
sponsored by the Institute of Internation- 
al Education, whose director, Dr. Ste- 
phen Duggan, is at present in Moscow 
to complete arrangements for attendance 
by American students. 

The summer session at the University 
of Moscow is open to students, school 
teachers, or social workers, courses be- 
ing offered are in Education, Economics, 
Psychology, Sociology, Aeronautics, Art, 
and Literature according to the director 
of the Anglo-American Institute, L V. 
Sollins. The purpose of the school is to 
(Continued on Page 3, Column 5) 



Youth, Joy, Beauty 
Typical Frolic Scene 

SCHULER AND ORCHESTRA 



Several Alumnae Return For 
First Conservatory 
Formal 



The Conserv Dance — it is over but 
pleasant memories shall live on in the 
hearts and minds of those who attend- 
ed. This dance can be described in three 
words— youth, joy, and beauty. Not 
only the students, but the faculty mem- 
bers, too, "joined hands" to make this 
first formal "Conserv" dance a success- 
ful one. 

By 8:45 most of the couples had ar- 
rived. Girls dressed in beautiful gowns 
and men in appropriate attire were soon 
swaying to the melodious tunes of Jack 
Schuler and his orchestra. During inter- 
mission couples joined each other and 
strolled into the dining rooms where re- 
freshments were served. In a short time 
the orchestra resumed playing and dan- 
cing continued until 11:50. Then deco- 
rations were removed, goodbyes said, 
(Continued on Page 4, Column 2) 



Richies Entertain 

Life Work Recruits 



On Monday night, April 16, the Life 
Work Recruits were delightfully enter- 
tained by Dr. and Mrs. Richie at their 
home. Fifteen members of the organiza- 
tion were present, with Dr. and Mrs. 
Clyde A. Lynch as special guests. The 
early part of the evening was spent in 
playing an assortment of novel and fas- 
cinating games taxing both the wits and 
skill of everyone present. Next, some 
very delicious refreshments were served. 
The party ended with the singing of a 
number of songs, both religious and sec- 
ular, in which the group might readily 
have qualified as a first class glee club. 
Everyone who was present enthusiasti- 
cally testifies to the gracious hospitality 
of the Richies. 



Katharine Cornell 
Ever-Popular Star 
In Successful Play 

TO APPEAR IN HARRISBURG 



Readers and Dramatic Clubs 
Looking Forward To 
Production 



"The Barretts of Wimpole Street," a 
famous story of the clandestine love and 
flight of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Browning, 
will be presented at Harrisburg on May 
8, and will feature the ever-popular 
Katharine Cornell. The play was recent- 
ly written by Rudolph Besier, and imme- 
diately met with success on the stage. 

The play deals with the efforts of Rob- 
ert Browning to rescue Elizabeth Bar- 
rett from the baleful atmosphere created 
by the head of the family. Along with 
considerable brains and a dominating 
personality the father, Edward Moulton- 
Barrett, is distinguished by hypocrisy 
and incestuous tendencies. He bullies or 
makes thinly-veiled love to the members 
of his family in such a way that the spec- 
tator fairly hisses at the villainous fa- 
ther-in-law. Apart from the main busi- 
ness of the play, which is the study of 
this despicable character, there is the 
subsidiary love story of the interesting- 
ly ailing Elizabeth and the hearty hand- 
some poet. Robert is presented as com- 
ing with tremendous vitality which ani- 
mates his poetry— with enormous gusts 
and love of sunshine and life. He pours 
something into Elizabeth as she lay wan- 
ly on her couch— some of his own vigor 
and strength. They finally escape from 
the confinement of the house to happiness 
and Italy. 

Edward Moulton-Barrett, in the light 
of history, can not escape the charge of 
being a Victorian father. With a nu- 
merous brood of sons and daughters, he 
sternly forbids one and all to think of 
marriage. He wanted to concentrate 
their affection on himself. 



NOVEL PROGRAM 

CLIONIAN TEA 



The Clionian Literary Society enter- 
tained Delphian at a tea Thursday after- 
noon in the society hall in North Hall. 
Dr. Lietzau and Miss Wood presided 
at the tea tables. During the course of 
the afternoon a brief program was pre- 
sented. Miss Ruth Buck played a spirit- 
ed piano number with finish. Her selec- 
tion was Chopin's "Minute Waltz." Miss 
Alma Cline gave a fetching reading in 
which she portrayed "The Mother of 
Little Maude and Little Maude." Miss 
Gayle Mountz next sang two lovely 
songs in her characteristically charming 
manner. First she sang Reichardt's 
"When the Roses Bloom" and then the 
familiar "Cloud Shadows" by Rogers. 
Miss Mountz was accompanied by Miss 
Grace Naugle. As a final number, Miss 
Oleta Dietrich played a violin solo. Her 
choice was "Mazurka" by Haesche; Miss 
Nancy Bowman was the accompanist. 
The program was planned by a commit- 
tee consisting of Misses Margaret Koh- 
ler and Louise Shearer. Misses Chris- 
tine Gruber, Elizabeth Carl, and Jean 
Harnish composed the group which ar- 
ranged the tea. 

The majority of Delphian and Clio 
members were in attendance. In addi- 
tion to the girls Madam Green and Miss 
Gillespie were guests. 



1 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 26, 1934 



3La Viz Collegtetme 

ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Helen Earnest, '35 Editor-in-Chief 

George Hiltner, '35 Associate Editor 

Richard Baus, '37 Managing Editor 

David Yake, '36 Asst. Man. Editor 



RE PORTO RIAL STAFF 

Catherine Wagner, '35 
Sylvia Evelev, '36 
Louise Gillan, '36 
Lester Krone, '36 
Marian Leisey, '36 
Maxine Earley, '37 

Grace Naugle, '37 General Reporters 

Ida K. Hall, '35 Conservatory 

William Earnest, '37 Athletics 

Miriam Eichner, '37 Alumni 

Louis Straub, '37 Philokosmian 

Charles Hauck, '35 Kalozetean 

Jane Shellenberger, '36 Clionian 

Marietta Ossi, '35 ^Delphian 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Kenneth Sheaffer, '35. .Business Manager 
C Edward Arndt, '35. Asst. Bus. Manager 
Robert Cassel, '36. . .Circulation Manager 
EiwoodJJeectj^^^ 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 

Single Copies.." .TTTiTcents 

Subscnr^ion^^^^^^ 

Entered7~aT the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter, under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



THURSDAY, APRIL 26, 1934 



SPRING FEVER 



What does the creeping up of the sap 
call to mind? A dissertation on fresh- 
men? No? Instead, the drowsy listless 
languor of the Spring, when young and 
old, male and female crawl from their 
cozy winter nests— dormitories in this 
case— and migrate to the sunny open 
fields along the "Quittie," Kreider's, 
Lover's Lane, or any of the other hun- 
dred and one favorite student hang-outs. 
A new interest in nature is developed al- 
most over night, and astronomy takes on 
new thrills and delights. The cool crisp 
moon laughingly looks down upon these 
groups of night strollers— never in a 
hurry— pacing along just fast enough to 
enjoy the full significance of the perfect 
spring atmosphere. 

There is something in the air that 
seems to urge us to cast aside dry texts, 
lengthy assignments go unprepared, and 
outside library readings are neglected. 
The faculty burdened by this necessity 
for interesting lecture material bears pa- 
tiently the heavy burden of this strange 
Spring malady, but even they, too, must 
weaken and seek the gay outdoors for 
meditation and advice. 

What could be more ideal than class- 
es on the verdant college campus? Ideal 
—in the sense that meetings are a neces- 
sary evil in this stage of the game. Even 
the most dry translations and musty his- 
tory passages would become alive and 
vibrant if studied under the magnetic in- 
fluence of the pale blue sky with its float- 
ing clouds, a gentle breeze, and a sunny 
landscape. A Utopian Lebanon Valley 
could be described thus; cuts would be 
forgotten and final examinations elimi- 
nated, giving a young man's fancy the 
proper setting and atmosphere to turn to 
thought of love. Perhaps this dream is 
not too far-fetched, and in future genera- 
tions we may find these ideal conditions 
existing at our alma mater. 



About Books 



HAVE YOU READ? 



ANNOUNCEMENT 



Next week there will be an Alumni 
issue of La Vie. The staff would be 
very grateful if faculty members and 
students would contribute any infor- 
mation or items of interest pertaining 
to the alumni. Contributors will please 
deposit any such items in the box lo- 
cated in the library not later than 4 
o'clock Monday, April 30. 



The comedy "Family Cruise" by Hel- 
en Ashton is a gay entertaining novel 
of a three weeks cruise to Greece made 
by Rose Delamere, her husband, her old- 
est and her youngest daughters. The 
object is to get them away from their 
individual troubles, and it does just that. 
Edith Wharton says of it, "Miss Ash- 
ton it seems has been concealing a gift 
for crisp, bright dialogue and subtly 
hilarious incident. Her book is a comedy 
(with some excellent description for 
good measure) and however slight it 
may be, one cannot help hoping that she 
will do more in this vein." 

"After Worlds Collide" is too interest- 
ing for anyone to pass up. The inhabi- 
tants of the earth foresee the collision of 
a strange planet with the earth and make 
an expedition to new planets. The mon- 
archists, the Fascists and the Commu- 
nist all try to establish their own govern- 
ment. They are all finally subdued by 
the cleverness of an American girl. The 
book is a scientific thriller. 

Tiffany Thayer gives us 344 pages of 
a "startling new novel" called "Doctor 
Arnoldi." 

"Anthony Adverse" of a few months 
ago proves to have been a best seller 
in both England and America, and edi- 
tions are soon to appear in France, Den- 
mark, Holland and Germany. Hervey 
Allen, its author, spent four years on it. 

Have you read: "I Went to Pit Col- 
lege," "While Rome Burns," "Kaleido- 
scope," "I Was a German," "Long Re- 
member?" 



SIGMA KAPPA 

ETA REMARKS 



A catastrophe has been reported. Bet- 
ty Schaak's toothbrush has been stolen 
from her locker, greatly to the distress of 
her immediate family, who must now 
contemplate buying a new one. 



Two of our shining lights are furnish- 
ing a great deal of amusement with their 
sudden attack of puppy love and spring 
fever combined. Blushes, giggles, and 
whispers indicate their topic of conver- 
sation from morning to night. To cap it 
off, they even remain at our fascinating 
school all evening; however lessons or 
prayer meetings are not the big attrac- 
tion. 



Our long-promised innovations were 
finally given to us, to the great surprise 
of everyone concerned. New curtains, 
rocking chairs, and small tables have 
been installed, greatly improving the 
general appearance of the rooms. 



In these days of talk about anti-gos- 
sip, the day student room is slowly but 
surely trying at least to decrease the 
amount of dirt dished out there; although 
it must be confessed that complete suc- 
cess has not been attained as yet. Our 
old motto, "Please Don't Talk About 
Me When I'm Gone," is still in vogue, 
but it must be confessed that the "Up- 
lift Society" has been somewhat effec- 
tive. 



Who is the supposedly hard-boiled 
and sophisticated girl who just dotes on 
shedding copious tears at movies, great- 
lv to the amusement of her bosom pals? 



PROMINENT VALLEY CO-EDS 




There is one serious drawback in writ 
ing a column like this— those mentioned 
in the column usually trace the well 
meant but slightly exposing comments 
back to their wretched inventor, and life 
is made pretty hot for her. For that rea 
son, the innuendoes must be veiled and 
subtle— oh! if we could tell all we know! 



KATHRYN M. MOWREY 

A very ardent and hard-working stu- 
dent is Kit. One usually finds her in the 
library or strolling about the campus 
paths— a member of the illustrious Hikers 
Club for early birds. Retiring "Y" Presi- 
dent, an enthusiastic associate editor of 
T.a Vie, and the star feminine debater. 
Kit is one of those fortunate mortals 
who has a position awaiting her for 
next year at New Cumberland where 
she will pound idioms into gullible stu- 
dents. 



HELEN R. LANE 

Helen hails from Lodi, New Jersey. A 
very dignified miss, prominent in Del- 
phian's limelight where she now holds 
the office of president. She is to be a 
member of the May Court with the other 
prominent senior belles. An English ma- 
jor and assistant. One formerly noticed 
a detached air about our fair Helen, but 
with the arrival of a home town buddy 
this attitude has been removed into thin 
air. 



CAMPUS CUTS 



A certain promising young professor 
of the king's English, it is told, recently 
gave one of his classes a fine example of 
graceful apology. While passing out 
theme papers he chanced to bump into 
the steel locker which serves as a storage 
place for said prof's coat, hat and pina- 
fore, while he wields ferule and hand- 
book. Being a gentleman, and realizing 
that the fault of the unfortunate incident 
was entirely his, he turned to the of- 
fended locker, executed an apologetic 
bow, and diffidently murmured, "I beg 
your pardon." 

As nearly as we have been able to as- 
certain, he was forgiven on the spot! 
Some of the more thoughtful members of 
the class have complicated matters con- 
siderably by declaring that the chival- 
rous prof mistook the locker for one of 
his students. The color of the locker, it 
must be admitted, lends plausibility to 
that theory! Yes— you're right— it's 
green! 



The theme for the May Day pageant 
is resplendent with much color, drama 
and suspense. Miss Kenyon and Prof. 
Shaar are working overtime in getting 
the various rehearsals under way, and 
they report that very favorable progress 
is being made. It appears that they had 
originally intended preparing a dramatic 
presentation of Eliza crossing the ice, but 
dropped the project when they sensed 
too great a difficulty in procuring fresh- 
men boys to assume the role of the 
hounds. Their conscience, they declared, 
would not permit them to infringe upon 
canine rights! 



Who ducked W— W— Wampler as 
he was working beneath the w— w— 
window? 



O, ther cad be doe questud aboud idt- — 
sprig is here. I cad feel idt id dthe air— 
I cad sbell idt! Every bordig I cad hear 
a couple robids siggig outside by wi- 
dow. 



CLIO SCANDAL 

PUBLICLY AIRED 



Did anyone within hearing distance 
miss the mouse episode on second floor? 
I might say, could any one miss it? It 
was a scream — for Prissy Groff until 
the all-around handy man, Verna, drove 
the villain off. 



Overheard in the hall: 

"Well, Bill, what are we going to do 
when we get married; you don't like 
cauliflower, or beans, or anything I like." 
Suppose they'll live on love? 



When anyone mentions living on love 
Fran wants to know "Who's going to 
get married?" What's that crack about 
great minds? 



In reference to the May Day pageant, 
there remains yet one difficulty which 
has caused the directors no little con- 
cern. According to the scenario, the per- 
formers of the Archers' dance are at a 
certain point required to actually shoot 
their arrows. Now, as we have no Wil- 
helmina Tellenias in our midst, it is pain- 
fully obvious that such an undertaking 
might easily prove disastrous to the lives 
and limbs of certain of the spectators. 
Our humble solution is as follows: let 
the sweet, young things aim directly at 
the innocent spectators when they dis- 
charge their deadly missies. In that way 
they (the spectators) would be insured 
the highest possible degree of safety. 



This Sandt boy certainly rates in 
North Hall. The ultra-ultra third floor- 
ians give him supreme preference for 
dances— and other things. 



Madame Green, a Clionian, gives us 
the following epitaph: 

Si dessous Antoine repose II ne fait 
jamais autre chose. 



During Heart-Sister Week some of 
the girls who gave candy said, "Sweets 
to the Sweet." I wonder what those 
who gave nuts had in mind. 



The old adage says, "Still water runs 
deep." In that case I haven't the least 
idea what Frances Keiser is concealing 
from us. 



Clio-Philc News 



The Clio-Philo anniversary play, 
entitled "Death Takes a Holiday," 
which is to be presented on the eve- 
ning of May 4, promises to be a gala 
affair. Regular rehearsals under the 
charge of Dr. Wallace are well un- 
der way, and the indications are that 
the presentation will be quite suc- 
cessful. 




Voice on Phone— "Palatini is sick and 
can't attend classes today. He requeued 
me to notify you." 

Professor— "All right. Who is this 
speaking?" 

Voice— "This is my roommate." 



Woman (telephoning to desk clerk) - 
"There's a rat in my room." 

Hotel Clerk— "Make him come dow n 
and register." 



Mrs. Ford— "Young man, take y 0Ur 
hand off my daughter's knee." 

Ricker— "Excuse me, madam. I was 
just going to say what a swell joint you 
have here." 



Heath (telephoning) -- 'Is my wife 
home?" 

Maid— "No, whom shall I say called?" 



Interviewer— "What have you to say 
about anonymous letters?" 

Professor— "They're stupid! I read 
them but I never answer them." 



"How much did you say them apple 



"Fifteen cents a peck." 
"WhaMya think I am— a bird?" 



An L. V. C. practice teacher was 
teaching her class, and she was very par- 
ticular about doing things in the most 
correct manner on her first day. She 
first asked the boys to give their names. 
The first boy gave his name as Si. 

"Oh, no, you should say Silas," satf 
the sweet young thing. 

The next boy said his name was Tom. 

"Oh, no, you should say Thomas,' 
she replied, forcibly. 

"And row, what is the name of the 
boy back of Thomas?" she asked. 

"Jackass," came the sudden and brief 
reply. 



"Does that Prof like you?" 

Bibby Carl— "Oh, he must. At least 
every paper he hands back to me is cov- 
ered with kiss marks." 



Buck— "Every time I look at you 1 
think of a great man." 

Eastland— "You flatter me. Who is 

it?" 

Buck— "Darwin." 



Intimate conversation in the 9> r ' s 
dorm: 

1st Co-ed-"She told me that you w'J 
her the secret I told you not to tell her- 

2nd Co-ed-"The mean thing! I t0,d 
her not to tell you I told her." . 

1st Co-ed— "Well, don't tell her that 
told you she told me." 



Homer Kendall Leads 
Weekly Prayer Meeting 



fhe rC 
nd 



The weekly prayer meeting was 
the leadership of Homer Kendall, 
was an unusually fine program a" 
unusually large attendance. After 
Summy, the accompanist for the eve ^ 
played a short piano prelude, a° J 
group had sung a hymn, Miller Sc h j 

& 



read the scripture lesson and 
prayer. Dale Roth then sang a fe^ 
tions to the accompaniment of his 9^ 
The first was a composition of 
a song of twilight, and the next j. 
medley of old hymns of a mother- ^ 
Hostetter was the speaker, and he 
prayer for his topic. After anothe 1 " ^ 
ning hymn, the group joined in 1 C 
eluding prayer circle. 



1 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 26, 1934 



PAGE THREE 



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Lebanon Valley opens its baseball 
ainpa ign without the active services of 
gill Smith, star southpaw, whose injured 
houldcf is not responding to treatment. 
It is believed "Smitty" will be out of 
the ga me ^ or at ^ east a cou P^ e °^ wee ks. 

\Vith Smith unavailable, "Hooks" My- 
•jjj is training John Witters with added 
z eal ^ e has also delegated "Butch" 
garthold from the outfield to bolster his 
hurling staff. "Butch" was a pitcher in 
his high school days and can still toss 
u p the curves and speed balls. 



The rest of the team looms up as a for- 
midable foe for any nine. "Barney" 
Mentzer is behind the plate; Captain 
Rtiss Williams is at first base; Frankie 
Boran and Charlie Rust are taking care 
f the second base and shortstop posi- 
tions; "Dutch" Arndt is guarding the hot 
corner; "Sully" Whiting, Sincavage and 
the extra pitcher will be used in the out- 
field. 



Drexel and Bucknell officially opened 
the league season at Lewisburg last Sat- 
urday, with Bucknell victorious by the 
close score of 9 to 8. Bucknell took an 
early lead and managed to hold it in 
spite of two threatening Drexel rallies. 
By virtue of their victory, the Bucknel- 
lians rest unchallenged in first place. 



The baseball schedule in this week's 
La Vie is a complete schedule of all the 
league games to be played this season, 
but does not include extra games with 
league or non-league teams. So don't 
forget the five extra games on the Leba- 
non Valley schedule. 



The tennis team showed how it should 
be done on Monday afternoon as they 
swamped Elizabethtown College. Don- 
moyer, especially, was in form, with his 
shots^backhands, forehands, lobs, vol- 
leys—working to perfection. The four 
veterans also played good tennis but 
showed the effects of the long winter 
lay-off. Before June 1 we should see 
some dazzling exhibitions. 



Speaking of dazzling exhibitions, we 
think it's a shame that Big Bill Tilden 
and Ellsworth Vines can't stop off at 
L. V. for a while when they're in this 
vicinity next month. What an exciting 
chapel program that would make. We're 
ready to bet our lives that every seat 
would be occupied unless some freshman 
would be lost, strayed, or stolen. 



And by the way, freshmen aren't the 
0n ly ones who become lost, strayed, or 
stolen. On Monday the racqueteers 
c °uldn't find "Wib" Shroyer when it 
came time for his singles match with 

ucner of E-town. However, freshman 
ttoltzman stepped into the breach and 
Pushed off his opponent, 6-1, 6-0. 



Soon the rainy Saturdays will begin 
se ttle in upon L. V. C. If history re- 
Peat s itself, May Day will have to be 
Postponed until May 26. Oh, well, they 
V the longer you must wait for some- 
n 9 the more you'll appreciate it when 
c °mes. Here's to bigger and better 
showers! 

ENTERTAINMENT BY 
MUSIC DEPARTMENT 
AT ANNUAL FESTIVAL 



! Continued from Page One) 



Mortal 

a 



Dixie, which, in turn, becomes 

waltz 

°Per a T ra9 " time ' and at last grand 
lew C w '^' a ' so b e some snappy 

, arc ^ es on the program, 
for L ets for the festival are 25 cents 
Th e n Concer t or 40 cents for both. 
te en ^° Ceeds will be used to buy thir- 
$a m B &W band uniforms and fif ty white 
"Consp^" 6 belts - Let's all support the 
>n this worthwhile enterprise! 



Schedule 



1934 Eastern Pennsylvania Colle- 
giate Baseball League schedule: 

Sat., April 21 —Drexel vs. Bucknell at 
Lewisburg. 

Wed., April 25— Juniata vs. Gettys- 
burg at Gettysburg. 

Fri., April 27-Lebanon Valley vs. 
Ursinus at Collegeville. 

Sat., April 28— Bucknell vs. Albright 
at Reading. 

Tues., May 1 — Juniata vs. Lebanon 
Valley at Annville. 

Fri., May 4— Gettysburg vs. Ursinus 
at Collegeville. 

Sat., May 5— Bucknell vs. Juniata at 
Huntingdon. 

Sat.. May 5— Gettysburg vs. Drexel 
at Philadelphia. 

Wed., May 9— Albright vs. Gettys- 
burg at Gettysburg. 

Wed., May 9— Bucknell vs. Lebanon 
Valley at Annville. 

Fri., May 11— Ursinus vs. Juniata at 
Huntingdon. 

Sat., May 12— Drexel vs. Albright at 
Reading. 

Sat., May 12— Lebanon Valley vs. 

Gettysburg at Gettysburg. 
Sat., May 12— Ursinus vs. Bucknell 

at Lewisburg. 
Tues., May 15— Juniata vs. Albright 

at Reading. 
Fri., May 18— Drexel vs. Lebanon 

Valley at Annville. 
Fri., May 18— Gettysburg vs. Buck- 
nell at Lewisburg. 
Sat, May 19— Albright vs. Ursinus 

at Collegeville. 
Sat., May 19— Drexel vs. Juniata at 

Huntingdon. 
Sat., May 26— Lebanon Valley vs. 

Albright at Reading. 
Sat., May 26— Ursinus vs. Drexel at 

Philadelphia. 



Glee Club, Stevenson 
Harrisburg Broadcast 



rv 



Thursday evening, April 26, from 
8:30 to 9:00 P. M., Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege featured the Glee Club, directed by 
Professor Rutledge, in another of the 
series of broadcasts over WHP, Harris- 
burg. Along with the Glee Club, Dr. 
Stevenson was presented in an interest- 
ing talk on the subject, "The Political 
Philosophy of the New Deal." 

As a further attraction on the pro- 
gram, the violin quartet made up of Mar- 
tha Elser, Russell Hatz, Oleta Dietrich, 
and Professor Harold Malsh rendered 
several numbers in their usual style. One 
of the numbers by the Glee Club was the 
"Italian Street Song," by Herbert, in 
which Miss Matilda Bonanni was fea- 
tured as soprano soloist. 

The program was as follows: 

Salutation Gaines 

The Bells of Notre Dame Klemm 

Italian Street Song Herbert 

(Soloist, Matilda Bonanni) 

Glee Club 

Gavotte iScotson Clarke 

Polonaise Bach 

Violin Quartet 
Talk: "The Political Philosophy of the 
New Deal" 

Dr. E. H. Stevenson 

Andantius Lemare 

Sarabande Carl Bohn 

Violin Quartet 

Halleluia, Amen Handel 

Go Down, Moses (Negro Folk Song) 

arr. by Noble Cain 

Glee Club 
The Glee Club was accompanied by 
Miss Ruth Bailey. 



Note: South Hall. 

The men's dorm is inflicted with a so- 
phomore resident who is twenty-one 
years old, has never been kissed, and 
never had a girl. Tsk! tsk! Are you girls 
losing that feminine charm? 



FRESHMAN THEME 



LIFE'S DARKEST MOMENT 



Many people tell me that I closely re- 
semble my sister, who is two years my 
„enior. Whether that is for better or for 
worse, I do not know. However, I clear- 
ly remember one occasion upon which I 
was unable to conceal my identity. The 
results of being recognized were embar- 
rassing, to say the least. 

It was upon my sister's tenth anniver- 
ary (of birth, not of marriage) that my 
pirits retreated to their lowest ebb. If 
that occasion was not my life's darkest 
moment, I dread the time when I shall ex- 
perience that moment, for I fear I may 
then lose what sanity I have retained 
through my seventeen years of life on 
this exquisite orb known as the earth. 

It seems that my mother had arranged 
for an elaborate masquerade party as a 
celebration of my sister's birthday. The 
party was to be a strictly female affair, 
according to the plans. However, I had 
a plan of my own. 

Tempted more by the prospects of lus- 
cious refreshments— pumpkin pie, ice 
cream, pretzels, cake, candy and cider— 
than by the thought of mingling with the 
girls (to whose flirtations I was not then 
susceptible), I planned to masquerade 
also, and crash the party. 

There was, in the family's possession, 
a Little Bo-Peep costume, an ancient re- 
lic of the gay Nineties or the Civil War 
period or thereabouts. To my immature 
mind this seemed to be the ideal guise for 
the fulfillment of my base intentions. I 
doffed my male attire and assumed the 
role of Little-Bo-Peep, with my sister's 
silk stockings and Sunday shoes com- 
pleting the misrepresentation. Peering 
out from behind my protecting mask, I 
adjudged my mirrored self a masterpiece 
of deception. 

With gluttonous greed I anticipated 
that devouring of refreshments which I 
was soon to enjoy. I could already feel 
the satisfactory reaction to my mother's 
own spicy pumpkin pie, to smooth home- 
made vanilla ice cream, to a multitude of 
pretzels, to a huge end piece of cake, to 
pockets full of candy, and to glass upon 
glass of cider. But, alas, even as I anti- 
cipated such delights I was spelling my 
own doom. For as I was thus anticipat- 
ing I was at the same time descending 
the stairs toward the group of girls, and 
incidentally toward this Utopian supply 
of food. 

It seems that, in my pre-arrangements 
of ideas, I had completely forgotten that 
a boy of eight differs somewhat from a 
girl of ten who is trying to look like 
twenty. The particular male attribute 
which proved my undoing was clumsi- 
ness, of which I possess more than my 
rightful share. I was entirely unaware 
of the fact that young ladies do not de- 
scend a series of steps hastily and with 
a great clatter of heels, but are wont to 
show their dignity by descending slowly 
and daintily. 

My mother readily recognized my 
awkward descent and, much to my dis- 
may, pulled off my mask and exhibited 
me, Little-Bo-Peep attire notwithstand- 
ing, to the party of girls. I so keenly 
felt the embarrassment of the situation 



Administration Notes 



April 29— Dr. Lynch will preach at 
Hagerstown, Md., at Grace U. B. 
Sunday School at 9:45, at Emmanuel 
U. B. Church at 10:45, and at St. 
Paul U. B. Church at 7:30. 

April 30— From 9:00 to 9:30 Dr. 
Lynch will take part in a radio broad- 
cast. At 10:30 he will address the In- 
terdenominational Ministerium, while 
at 1:30 he will speak to the U. B. 
Ministerium. In the evening he ad- 
dresses the L. V. C. Club banquet. 

May 1 —Dr. Lynch will address a 
regional meeting of the Lions Club at 
Millersville State Teachers College. 



that as soon as I could twist from my 
mother's grasp I scampered off to bed, 
without even waiting for a normal share 
of the refreshments. 

If I ever have the misfortune to run 
for public office I hope my opponents 
never learn of this story, for if it were 
revealed, I would certainly be defeated 
in the face of such debasing facts as 
these. 

William H. Earnest. 



HEDGEROW PLAYERS 

PERFORM AT HERSHEY 



(Continued from Page One) 



try many types of roles, and not to go 
stale on a long run of the same play. 

The name was given to the group by 
Ann Harding when a formidable sheriff 
threatened to evict the young group 
early in its existence from its then in- 
secure place in the country. The fa- 
mous blonde movie star said, "Well, if 
we're thrown out of our theatre, we can 
go and play under the 'hedgerows' which 
line the country road." They didn't have 
to play under the "hedgerows,' but the 
name remained and today "Hedgerow" 
stands for the best in theatre entertain- 
ment on the legitimate stage. 

Eva LeGalliene, Ann Harding, Alex- 
ander Kirkland, John Beal, and many 
others prominent in the entertainment 



world have at one time or another been 
connected with the Hedgerow; Ann 
Harding still returns yearly to play at 
the Rose Valley Temple of Thespis. The 
Hedgerow recently received national 
publicity when Libby Holman, ex-musi- 
cal comedy star, decided to return to the 
stage via Hedgerow's director, Jasper 
Deeter. The small class she is studying 
in at Hedgerow, however, is not con- 
nected with the playing company. 

"Twelfth Night" at Hershey was 
chosen by the Hedgerow group as a way 
of paying their respects to the great 
English dramatist, Shakespeare, on his 
three hundred seventieth anniversary, 
April 25. 



6 WEEKS SOVIET COURSE 
AT MOSCOW UNIVERSITY 



(Continued from Page One) 



afford visiting students a clear concep- 
tion of Soviet achievements in cultural 
and scientific fields since the 1917 revo- 
lution. 

Visitors will be offered a wide pro- 
gram of social, cultural, and sport activi- 
ties in addition to academic work. Ap- 
proximately four weeks of the session 
will be spent in residence at the Univer- 
sity of Moscow, and two weeks in a 
3,000 mile field work trip to other Soviet 
cities. 




THE THREE-MINUTE MEN 
Will March Tonight! 

Fall in tonight at 8:30 P.M. (Standard 
Time) when the Three-Minute Men go march- 
ing home. They are the boys who telephone 
the Family. A three-minute Station to Sta- 
tion call to anywhere within 100 miles costs 
only 35 cents at night. 

Fall in — enjoy a skirmish, with the Home 
Folks! You can pack a whole week's news 
in a three-minute telephone chat. With the 
low Night Rates, it's a weekly custom for 
thousands of college men. Join this army of 
Three-Minute Men. 



FOLLOW iliese EASY 
M All* IBI\<- OltltD ICS . . . 

Telephone after 8:30 P.M. Standard Time 
(9:30 P.M. Daylight Saving Time). 

The low Night Rates apply only on Station 
to Station calls — that is, on calls for a tele- 
phone, but not for a specific person. 

Just give the Operator the number you 
want. 

Charges may be reversed. 



THE BELL TELEPHONE COMPANY OF PENNSYLVANIA 




M — 8 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 26, 1934 



INK SPOTS 

By The Green Blotter Club 



THE MALCONTENTS 



"Going out again tonight, Gordon?" 

Gordon Sheaffer, pushing back from 
the restaurant table, nodded. "Yes, the 
show and the club. Give the wife and 
kids my regards." 

"Thanks, I'll do that," answered Clark. 
"Have a good time." He watched Sheaf- 
fer cross the cafeteria. "He doesn't look 
forty-five," he mused to himself. "Won- 
der why he never got married. Gee, he 
has a good time running around. No 
overtime nights at the office for him. 
Guess I'll go back to that hole now." 
Clark sighed a little as he left the table. 
Walter Clark 4id look forty-five— in 
fact he looked fifty, although he was 
only 38. His shiny blue business suit 
made him look even thinner than he was 
and accentuated his pale features. 

* * * * 

Gordon Sheaffer, walking down the 
street from the office building, swung his 
athletic frame easily from side to side. 
His trim appearance added greatly to 
his good looking face, and dark, frank, 
laughing eyes. He hailed a cab and 
rode over to his Washington square 
apartment. His two rooms on the four- 
teenth floor were soon ablaze with lights 
as he rushed about getting dressed. A 
red hot orchestra was playing over the 
radio and Sheaffer whistled with the mu- 
sic. Suddenly the telephone buzzed. 
"Hello," he said gruffly. "Hello, Gor- 
don," a feminine voice drawled. 

"Oh, hello Marie. All set for tonight, 
are you?" 

"Yes," answered Marie. "Our dance is 
over at 10:45. Don't be late." 

"I won't. I'm coming up early to see 
the show. Good-bye, kid." 

"Cute little thing, Marie," he mused 
as he continued shaving. "Pretty much 
of a gold digger, but then what chorus 
girl isn't. Marie is a good sport until she 
gets drunk." He smiled into the mirror 
as he combed his hair. At any rate he 
was having fun. That was all that mat- 
tered. 

* * * ★ 

It was midnight before Walter Clark 
got off the subway two blocks from his 
Brooklyn flat. He was dog tired. "Damn 
it all," he muttered as he started his 
walk, "every second night it's over time 
and more overtime. And I haven't a 
thing to show for it." He was in the 
depths of despair. "As fast as we get it, 
we have to spend it. Money, money, 
money. Why'd I ever get married in 
the first place? I could be a free-lancer 
like Sheaffer, the lucky dog. He even 
gets ahead faster than I do for all my in- 
dustry. Some day," he thought, "I'll 
really jump into the lake down here. 
God knows I've thought of it enough. 
My insurance would make the family 
comfortable for their lives." He paused, 
and then continued walking more slowly. 
"Why not tonight?" It was as good a 
time as any. His face was set and hard. 
He was nearing his house. He wished 
he didn't have to pass it. He looked 
ahead. "By George, wasn't that a light 
in Bobby's room? Yes it was. Good 
Lord," he said, as he broke into a trot. 
"I hope the poor kid hasn't got another 
earache." 

* * * * 

At three A. M. Sheaffer and Marie 
were still at the club. Manhattan cock- 
tails had just about tripped up Marie. 
She was dancing heavily and talking a 
blue streak. 

"Gordy," she tittered, "you're a swell 
~4y." Her blonde hair was hanging 
loosely, her flushed face resting on his 
shoulder. "Let's get married, Gordy." 

Sheaffer stopped abruptly. "Let's go 
home," he said. 

"Oh, no," cried the girl. 

"Oh, yes," said Sheaffer. He ushered 



her firmly toward the check room and 
then out beyond into the street. Stand- 
ing on the curb the girl swayed against 
him as he signalled for a taxi. "You 
gonna take me home?" she gurgled. 

'Til take you home but it's the last 
time. You can't go out one night without 
getting a load on." 

"Let's get married," she giggled. 

"Shut up," growled Sheaffer as he 
pushed her into the cab. 

It was four before he pushed the key 
into the latch of his own apartment. This 
time he lit one light and unconsciously 
snapped on the radio. Mechanically he 
began to undress. A western broadcast- 
ing station was sending out a strong ten- 
or voice singing "Wagon Wheel." Gor- 
don literally leaped at the switch, turn- 
ing it off with a vicious gesture. Then 
he sank into a chair. It was extremely 
quiet. His thoughts were carrying him 
back some twenty-five years to his col- 
lege life. They had called him Elmer 
when he had been a freshman— fresh 
from the Perry County, Pennsylvania, 
farmhouse of his parents. But it hadn't 
been Elmer for long. What a round of 
wild parties those four years had been. 
What a glamorous period of enjoyment. 
And then, right after college, the job, 
which he still held, with the insurance 
company. Funny, he thought, how he 
managed to be successful at it. Fun had 
been all he hunted. And he had gone on 
having it while his schoolmates and 
friends got married and settled down. 
Then, when he had finally thought of 
marriage, all the nice girls he had known 
were gone. But he hadn't cared much. 
He'd been too busy enjoying life. And 
now, what a helluva life it had turned 
out to be. He got out of his chair and 
walked about, talking to himself. "Look 
at Jack Clark. Married to a swell wife, 
has a couple of dandy kids. What have 
I got? Even the parties are going stale. 
The only women who'll go out with me 
are little gold-diggers like Marie. 'Let's 
get married., Hmph!" 

From the sideboard Gordon took a 
bottle and a drinking glass, poured out a 
stiff drink, and downed it at one gulp. 
He followed this with several more. Sud- 
denly he set the bottle down with a 
bang, a wild stare on his face. The win- 
dow! God knows he had thought of it 
enough. Fourteen stories were plenty to 
kill a man. Deliberately he went to the 
window and drew back the curtains. 
Slowly he raised the sash and stared 
down the fourteen stories. It was light. 
Down in little Washington Square Park 
the birds were singing. Sheaffer breathed 
the morning air deeply. There was a 
smile on his lips as he turned back into 
the room. "It's going to be a nice day," 
he said. 

—Henry Palatini. 



YOUTH, JOY, BEAUTY 

TYPICAL FROLIC SCENE 



(Continued from Page One) 



arid all departed with hopes of having 
another formal "Conserv" dance next 
year. 

The conservatory was very happy to 
see some of its alumnae at the dance- 
Miss Kathryn Lutz and Miss Regina 
Oyler. 

The "Conserv" students wish to thank 
the members of the conservatory faculty 
who acted as chaperones and the com- 
mittee chairmen, Bonanni, Early, Ely, 
Hall, Heckman, Sanders, and Slay- 
baugh, wish to thank the members of 
their committees for their fine efforts and 
cooperation in planning the dance. 



Union Student Paper 
Wages Campaign to 
Evaluate Professors 



Students of Union College have re- 
versed the usual process and are exam- 
ining the faculty to "see how many in- 
structors are adding strength to the col- 
lege and how many are doing (heir job 
right." 

An editorial in this vein in The Con- 
rordiensis was receive 1 with indignation 
by some members ot ti e faculty, cr eer- 
lully by others, and ,vith hearty acclaim 
by some of the leaders among the stu- 
dents. 

Former President Dav and Acting 
President Edward Ellery asked the stu- 
dents to "voice their opinions ' about ed- 
ucational matters. Since last Spring, 
when George R. Cory, Jr., became editor 
of the semi-weekly campus newspaper, 
The Concordiensis has pursued the poli- 
cy of examining student and faculty ac- 
tivities and evaluating thein :is * signifi- 
cant agencies of a strong college. ' 

Cory has minced no words ar.d used 
names boldly. 

Declaring that "it is the professor who 
makes the college, and a college is only 
as good as its worst professor," The 
Concordiensis asked each member of the 
faculty to "stand up ag;-.inst the wall and 
see how closely he approaches the ideal" 
by his answer to these eight questions: 

Does he find his greatest interest in his 
students and in intellectual pursuits? 

Does he seek to enlighten his students, 
rather than to make them recite funda- 
mentals? 

Does he try to introduce them to life 
and thought, not coach them to pass 
examinations? 

Does he put himself forward as a dis- 
penser of truth, not as an ingratiating 
vaudeville actor? 

Does he give the student all that he 
has of scholarship, wisdom and under- 
standing, despite their supposed immuni- 
ty to such? 

Is he striving to be a personal friend 
of the student, a guide and an inspira- 
tion? 

The Concordiensis has been severe 
with the students also. It waged war 
against the so-called campus honorary 
societies, and caused three of them to be 
abolished. 



SMASHING VICTORY 

FOR TENNIS ARTISTS 



(Continued from Page One) 



E-town was able to win only two games 
against Dick Ax, L. V. veteran, who was 
victorious, 6-1, 6-1. George Holtzman, 
another freshman, made it a clean sweep 
of the singles by allowing Bucher, Eliza- 
bethtown's No. 6 racqueteer, only one 
game in winning 6-1, 6-0. In the doubles 
two Lebanon Valley teams completed 
the rout by turning in decisive victories 
to bring the score for the match to 8-0. 
Lehman and Shroyer defeated Zuck and 
Cassel, 6-1, 6-3, and Walborn and Ax 
defeated Bucher and McDonald, 6-4, 6-3. 

The tennis artists showed plenty of 
skill, with a wide variety of strokes, good 
form, and an abundance of speed, so that 
some brilliant tennis can be expected be- 
fore the season is over. The racqueteers 
have a full schedule in their first week 
of intercollegiate competition. In addi- 
tion to the Elizabethtown match, Leba- 
non Valley will oppose Gettysburg, 
Brooklyn, and St. Joseph's colleges, with 
the former away and the latter two on 
the home courts. 



Doutr 



Always Reliable fe f 



Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 




DEAL SETTING 
CLIO BREAKFAST 



Members of Clio held a jolly break- 
fast-hike last Saturday morning. About 
thirty members with their guests, Mrs. 
Reynolds, Mrs. Stonecipher, and Miss 
Myers, left North Hall at seven o'clock 
and hiked to Steinmetz's woods, where 
in a clearing the fire was built and the 
food produced. Kathryn Louise Witmer, 
with her committee, was responsible for I 
the delicious steaks with onions, the rolls, 
the cocoa, and the fruit on the menu. As 
expected on the first venture some of 
the steaks were too well done and others 
fit for Tarzan. The walk back to the 
campus was made most enjoyable by the 
delightful spring morning. Many re- 
quests have been voiced for a repetition 
of this hike. 



A Few Books Every 
Student Should 
Have— 



Modern Word Finder $1.00 

Roget's Thesaurus 1.00 

Crabbe's Synonyms 1.00 

Book of American Poetry 1.00 

Standard Book of British and 

American Poetry 1 .50 

Oxford Book of American 

Verse 1.00 

Complete Poems of Keats 

and Shelley 1.00 

World's Best Poems 1.00 

World's Best Loved Poems.... 1.00 

BOLLMAN'S 

628 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 



J. E. GIPPLE 
Fire Insurance and Real Estate 
1251 Market Street 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



KREAMER BROS. 



EASY ELECTRIC WASHERS 
GAS STOVES AND RANGES 
RUGS AND LINOLEUMS 
PICTURE FRAMING 



Furniture - - Undertaking 



Phone 144 ANNVILLE, PA. 



SANDWICHES SODAS 

EAT AT ROEMIG'S 

DELICIOUS HOME-MADE 
ICE CREAM 



FLOWERS 

FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

BERNSTEIN'S 

LEBANON, PENNA. 



BENEFIT SHOWfs 

FOR 

SENIOR CLASS 

OF 

Annville 
High School 

AT 

ASTOR THEATRE 

MONDAY AND TI KSDAY 
RICHARD DIX 
IN 

Ace or Aces 



WEDNESDAY an d THURSDAY 
KATHERINE HEPBURN 

I M 

Morning Glory 



TICKETS CAN BE OBTAINED 
FROM ANY 
HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR 

Price . . . 25? 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

AtfcPTEA CO. 

C. H. SHEARER, Mgr. 



GRIMM'S BOOK STORE 

special 
crown set 
clionian pins— $12.00 



FOR QUALITY 

Baked Products 

PATRONIZE 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



MEN'S FLANNEL SLACKS....$2.98 
SANFORIZED SHRUNK 

SLACKS 1-69 

MEN'S WHITE 

SHOES : $3.00 and 3.98 

JOHN IIIRSCH DEPT. STORE 
YWVILLK PENNA. 



D. L. Saylor & Sons 
CONTRACTORS 

LUMBER and COAL 
Annville, Pennsylvania 



"COME AND GET A COKE" 
FOR A BITE or a BANQUET 



TRY. 



THE PENNWAY 




CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. B ASHORE 



A) 



LEBANON. PENNSYLVANIA 



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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



2200 COPIES 



VOL. XI 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, MAY 3, 1934 



No. 4 



alumni Groups 
Begin Existence 
Under Dr. Shenk 



INTERESTING SESSIONS 

Berks Co., New England, West- 
ern Maryland, Philadelphia, 
N. Y., Baltimore Branches 



On April 10, the Alumni of Berks 
County assembled at the home of Mrs. 
Meta Burbeck Bauer, '22, and then to 
the Iris Club of Wyomissing for dinner. 
Professor J. Lester Appenzeller, '08, Su- 
perintendent of the Schools of Wyomis- 
sing, presided. He called for brief re- 
marks from the Alumni present. One of 
the interesting addresses was given by 
Dr. George F. Bierman, 78, brother of 
the late President E. Benjamin Bierman. 
The principal address was delivered by 
President Lynch. The Alumni Field Sec 
retary spoke briefly concerning the or 
ganization of local groups. The follow 
ing officers were elected: President, Pro 
fessor W. W. Martin, '18; Secretary, 
Mrs. Meta Bauer, '22; Treasurer, Miss 
Olga Smith, '25. Among those present 
were the following: 

Dr. and Mrs. Clyde Lynch, Dr. and 
Mrs. H. H. Shenk, G. F. Bierman, Mr. 
and Mrs. Kurt Bauer, Mr. and Mrs. Lan- 
dis Klinger, Miss Pearl C. Lindemuth 
Rev. J. W. Luckens, Mrs. Katharine 
Rauch Miller, Miss Anna M. Saylor, 
Miss Martha V. Schmidt, Miss Olga M. 
Smith, Mr. Charles Wentzel, Miss Ruth 
Strubhaur, Mr. and Mrs. Theo. C. Walk- 
er, J. Lester Appenzellar, Mr. and Mrs. 
Edmonds, Miss Helen R. Hain, Mr. and 
Mrs. Wm. N. Martin, Mr. and Mrs. Ira 
M. Ruth, Miss Irene Schell, Miss Jose- 
phine Schell, Miss Myrtle Snyder, Rev. 
Ulrich, Mr. and Mrs. Luther Weik, Mrs. 
Mary Schach Posey, Dr. and Mrs. Her- 
ma n Light, and Mr. Elmer Eshelman. 

On the evening of March 17, the New 
England Alumni met in the First Presby- 
terian Church of Worcester, Massachu- 
Setts - Rev. Dr. Charles A. Fisher, '03, 
Pastor, and organized with the election 
of Dr. VV. O. Ellis, of the Ellis Chemical 
(Continued on Page 3, Column 4) 



Department Head 




Free Lance Writer 
Since L. V. College Days 

Mrs. Alice Crowell Hoffman, talented 

fr " e m " us - sports that she has been doing 

. ance writing practically ever since 

l ar r CoIle 9 e days. This has taken the form 

9e y of verse, editorial material, infor- 
mative ar,^ • 

v enjl and inspirational articles, and ju- 
Hoff* manuscri Pts of various types. Mrs. 
ec j u man se ^ s her work to syndicates, 
school' "' 11 journals - church and Sunday 
y 0un Publi cations, juvenile magazines, 
Mrs P j*j° ples P a P e rs, and newspapers. 

Hethe r j SayS ' 1 3m ° fte " asked 

d ° e x Writ ° Under my own namc - 1 
se Vera ] Cept wh en a publication contains 
Ali Ce p m y contributions. Then I am 

Vn n el1 Hoffman - Carol y n Prane - 

Ki the Norton, and M arion Gray. I 
f °u r Per , Un of seeir >g myself be these 

kavid Co ]^ ln 3 COpy of one of the 
rf *e ntlv °°k Publications which came out 
ter is Uns . My tospirational editorial mat- 
.^catecj ' ' 9ned as is also most of my syn- 

K be st t ateria1 ' The form of work 1 
? tori al i ° d ° U Versc or l ns Pirational 
%ht n e ' ther - 1 can catch a helpful 
«H the « ,v * it shape, and send it out 
°Pe that it will help another." 



CHIEF METOXEN 

It was with the greatest of pleasure 
that I accepted my new position at Leba- 
non Valley College. Although I am well 
aware of the difficult task that is before 
me— that of carrying on the work of that 
gentleman and coach, "Hooks" Mylin— 
I will endeavor to keep Lebanon Valley 
College in its honored place in competi- 
tive athletics. 

The job is a hard one to fill. It can- 
not be accomplished alone. The coopera- 
tion of alumni, students, and friends is 
necessary to carry on an effective phy- 
sical education and athletic program. 

—Emerson Metoxen. 

ALUMNI GROUPS 
CONTACTED IN 
MANY SECTIONS 



By Dr. H. H. Shenk 
The main objective of the Alumni 
Field Secretary for the present year was 
to contact with graduates in all sections 
of the country to suggest the organiza- 
tion of local groups. The response to 
this effort is gratifying, for organizations 
have been effected or are being planned 
from New England to California. 

On December 9 the Alumni of Harris- 
burg and vicinity gave a dinner in honor 
of Dr. and Mrs. Lynch at the Penn-Har- 
ris Hotel, Harrisburg. Among the lead- 
ers in this endeavor were Miss Lillian 
Quigley, '91, and Miss Garman, '28, who 
have been officers of the Alumnae or- 
ganization of Harrisburg. A very inter- 
esting program was arranged. J. Paul 
Rupp, Esq., '19, Treasurer of Dauphin 
County, acted as toastmaster. Addresses 
were delivered by Dr. Josiah Reed, '12, 
Harrisburg, and Miss Ethel Lehman, '22, 
Harrisburg. Miss Lehman had the dis- 
tinction of being an exchange teacher in 
England during the preceding year. 
(Continued on Page 2, Column 2) 



NOTICE! ALUMNI! 



Do you know of any prospective 
students with exceptional scholastic or 
athletic qualifications? Have you tried 
to interest them in Lebanon Valley 
College, your Alma Mater? Send 
nlong all the information you have 
available. If you need information, a 
letter to the College Office or your 
Alumni Secretary will provide the 
means of placing all of us on the job. 

D. K. Shroyer. 



Rev. J. A. Mackay, 
Ph.D., Speaker At 
Commencement 



JUNE 2 IS ALUMNI DAY 



Receptions, Trustee Meeting, 
Baseball Game, and Alumni 
Banquet Scheduled 



Football Coach 



Plans are now practically completed 
for the Sixty-Fifth Commencement of our 
college. Commencement week-end will 
begin on Thursday, May 31, when Dr. 
and Mrs. Lynch will hold a reception for 
the seniors. On June 1, 11:00 o'clock, 
there will be a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees. Saturday, June 2, is Alumni 
Day. There will be a reception for the 
alumni at the Lynch home from 1:30 till 
2:30. At 2:30 a baseball game is sche- 
duled. At 7 o'clock in the evening there 
will be the Alumni Banquet at the Her- 
shey Golf Club house preceded by a re- 
ception from 6:00 until 7:00. In the 
Annville United Brethren in Christ 
Church on Sunday morning at 10:30 
(Continued on Page 4, Column 4) 




Honors Bestowed Upon 
Derickson and Light 

Lebanon Valley can well be proud of 
her illustrious faculty. The student body 
and alumni have been brought to realize 
this still more by the honors so recently 
conferred upon the two members of the 
biology department. At the last meeting 
of the Pennsylvania Academy of Science, 
Dr. Derickson, the head of the biology 
department, was elected president. Dr. 
Light was named as assistant secretary 
of the academy. 

The academy is composed of the scien- 
tific leaders of the state and meets periodi- 
cally to present reports and papers of 
importance to the scientific world. Dr. 
Derickson and Dr. Light have been very 
active members of this body. Dr. Light 
has been a member of the program com- 
mittee during the past year. 




JERRYj FROCK 

/ will be indeed happy to be associated 
again with the [acuity and students of 
Lebanon Valley College. Filling the 
shoes of a coach as successful as Mylin 
has been is no small task. However, 
with the cooperation of the student body, 
alumni, and friends of the college, I am 
certain that Lebanon Valley will push 
even further ahead in her athletic pro- 



Leb. Valley Brought 
Outside Attention By 
Publicity Committee 

L. P. CLEMENTS IN CHARGE 



Student Activities, Sports, Bul- 
letins, and Pictures Wel- 
comed By Alumni 



gram. 



—Jerome Frock. 



COLLEGE PRESS 
SERVICE GIVES 
L. V. PUBLICITY 



Information Wanted 



The Office of the Registrar desires 
information concerning the where- 
abouts and activities of the following 
alumni with whom contact has been 

lost: 

Barber, G. E A.M., 1904 

Crawford, Herbert Organ, 1905 

Burtner, Rene D A.B., 1900 

Cleaveland, Mrs. Madie Burtner 

B.S., 1900 

Felty, Estella Art, 1916 

Seyer, Mary M A.B., 1928 

4atz, Ervin Piano, 1908 

Hostetter, Jesse A.B., 1905 

Irie, Joji Kingoro Ph.D., 1895 

Leslie, Jennie M. Voice, 1904 

Lindsay, Jane (Hoppis) . ..Piano, 1918 

Meyers, Oren G B.S., 1900 

Mimura, Luke Shigeyuki.JB.S., 1927 

Peter, Irene Bachman A.B., 1930 

Randall, Mrs. Matilda Bohr.Art, 1916 

Raudenbush, Esther A.B., 1926 

Rhoads, G. Frederick A.B., 1930 

Sanders, William J A.B., 1902 

Searing, Mrs. Mary Knepper 

A.B., 1882 

Steffey, Nora A.B., 1891 

Tittle. Edna L Music, 1922 

Whitmoyer, J. Lon B.S., 1879 

Zuck, Alice M A.B., 1908 

Any news or any clues will be 
greatly appreciated. 



By L. P. Clements 
People throughout the nation are rais- 
ing their voices in songs of praise to the 
New Deal and other administrative ven- 
tures that have started the country on 
the road to recovery while we alumni, 
students, and friends of Lebanon Valley 
College are cheering just as loudly for 
the "New Deal in Press Cooperation and 
Recognition." 

Lebanon Valley College, in conse- 
quence of [the favorable relationships 
that have been established with local 
newspapers and news dispatching agen- 
cies, can no longer be classed as the lit- 
tle "back woods" institution hidden be- 
hind the Main street buildings in Ann- 
ville, Pennsylvania. For years we were 
just another small college carrying on 
behind closed doors— the outside world 
knew little and cared less about what 
happened in a society business meeting, 
at an athletic event, at commencement, 
or anything else connected with the col- 
lege. 

(Continued on Page 3, Column 3) 



NOTICE OF DUES 



Have you paid your alumni dues of 
$2.00? Mrs. Lillian K. Shroyer, Cor- 
responding Secretary, reports that 
thus far the prompt response from the 
alumni has been most gratifying. If 
you have overlooked this request do 
your best to arrange for payment in 
the near future. Each two dollars aid 
greatly in the advancement of the in- 
rerests of our Association and our 
\lma Mater. 

D. K. Shroyer. 



By Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace 
The Committee on College Publicity 
takes pride in looking back, as the end 
of the college year approaches, on what 
it has accomplished during the past two 
years. 

When the present committee was ap- 
pointed it set itself these objectives: 

1. To keep the college constituency 
informed of campus activities, and espe- 
cially to keep local communities informed 
of the successes won here by the young 
people whom they have sent up to us. 

2. To present Lebanon Valley College 
to the attention of the public outside our 
community, in order that our friends, 
when they advise young people to come 
to us for their education, may not 
be embarrassed by finding themselves 
speaking on behalf of an unheard-of and 
therefore despised institution. The need 
of securing publicity, for instance, in 
Philadelphia has long been insisted on by 
alumni there who have been eager to 
send students to us. 

It is our belief that, while much re- 
mains to be done and many improve- 
ments in our press work are yet to be 
desired, these objectives have in large 
measure been attained. During the past 
year innumerable reports on student ac- 
tivities have been sent to (and printed 
by) small papers in our constituency; 
full athletic write-ups (often as many as 
fifty separate items a week) have been 
sent to and printed by a long list of pa- 
pers throughout the neighboring states 
and including the chief papers in Phila- 
delphia, New York, and Baltimore; spe- 
cial printed bulletins have been prepared 
for the Alumni and those attending Home 
Coming Day; pictures have been pub- 
lished of our president, Dr. Lynch, of 
our athletic teams, of the Band, the Or- 
( Continued on Page 2, Column 4) 



Racqueteers Vanquish 
G-Burg and St. Joseph 

The Lebanon Valley College tennis 
team brought their record for the current 
season to three victories and no defeats 
by emerging victorious in two matches 
during the past week. 

The L. V. C. racqueteers trounced the 
Gettysburg team last Wednesday at Get- 
tysburg. Nye and Ax lost their singles 
encounters, but Donmoyer, Walborn, 
and Shroyer were victorious and the 
Donmoyer-Nye and Walborn-Ax dou- 
bles combinations came through to give 
L. V. the match 5-2. 

Brooklyn College cancelled their match 
scheduled to be played in Annville on 
Friday, but on Saturday the Valley ten- 
nis stars crossed racquets with the strong 
St. Joseph's College team on the home 
courts. Donmoyer lost his first match of 
the season and Walborn was also defeat- 
ed. However, Nye, Lehman, and Ax 
turned in victories in their singles match- 
es, with the two doubles teams once 
again delivering to bring the final score 
to 5-2. 

(Continued on Page 3, Column 5) 



1 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 3, 1934 



Ha Viz Collegtenne 

ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Helen Earnest, '35 Editor-in-Chief 

George Hiltner, '35 Associate Editor 

Richard Baus, '37 Managing Editor 

David Yake, '36 Asst. Man. Editor 

RE PORTO RIAL STAFF 

Catherine Wagner, '35 
Sylvia Evelev, '36 
Liouise Gillan, '36 
Lester Krone, '36 
Marian Leisey, '36 
Maxine Earley, '37 

Grace Naugle, '37 General Reporters 

Ida K. Hall, '35 Conservatory 

William Earnest, '37 Athletics 

Miriam Eichner, '37 Alumni 

Louis Straub, '37 Philokosmian 

Charles Hauck, '35 Kalozetean 

Jane Shellenberger, '36 Clionian 

Marietta. Ossi, '35 Delphian 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Kenneth Sheaffer, '35. .Business Manager 
C. Edward Arndt, '35. Asst. Bus. Manager 
Robert Cassel, '36. . .Circulation Manager 
Elwood Needy, '37.... Asst. C ir. Manager 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 

Single Copies 5 cents 

Subscription $1-00 peryear 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter, under the 
Act of M arch 3, 1879. 

THURSDAY, MAY 3, 1934 



GREETINGS, ALUMNI 



If one were to peek into the stately 
halls of the college Administration build- 
ing, several delightful surprises would be 
sure to meet the eye. Thanks to the 
help of paint and varnish these pleasur- 
able results have been attained. After 
the infant flood during the summer months 
the gymnasium took on the appearance 
of a swimming pool— the complete trans- 
formation was brought about early in the 
fall months by the construction of a new 
hardwood floor and later rejuvenated, by 
paint and varnish. The corridors, the 
classrooms, and Philo Hall assumed a 
cheerful bright appearance after several 
coats of creamy paint. New trees have 
been added to the campus— and, at pres- 
ent, students are busily engaged in mow- 
ing dandelion from the ever green of the 
grass. Physical education has been add- 
ed to the "frosh" male curriculum, and 
one hears strange sounds and moans is- 
suing from the one-time quiet and peace- 
ful gymnasium. New faces everywhere 
—some soon to be gone, but never for- 
gotten. 

The biology laboratory is entirely 
changed— paint and partitions having 
performed the miracle. 

With the approach of May Day and 
the gorgeous pageantry, the Junior Prom 
and its atmosphere and gaiety drop your 
work, and may we welcome your return 
to the Alma Mater for old time's sake 
and your own enjoyment. 



Philo-Clio Presents 
Death Takes a Holiday 



The Clionian and Philokosmian 
Literary Societies will give their An- 
niversary play, entitled "Death Takes 
a Holiday," on Friday, May 4, at 8 
P. M. in the Engle Conservatory. 
Rehearsals, under the direction of Dr. 
P. A. W. Wallace, have been under 
way for some time, and the indications 
for a successful and entertaining pre- 
sentation are quite promising. Al- 
though "Death Takes a Holiday" is 
classed as a comedy, it is not without 
its moments of mystery and melodra- 
ma. A reception and dance, to which 
everybody is invited, will be held in 
the alumni gymnasium immediately 
following the play. 



Motivation Theme 
Green Blotter Club 



STRUBLES ENTERTAIN 



Lietzau, Green, and Mi/ers Are 
Guests of the Eve- 
ning 



The Green Blotter Club met at the 
home of Dr. and Mrs. Struble Thursday, 
April 26. The guests of the evening 
were Dr. Lietzau, Mrs. Green, and Miss 
Myers. 

The theme of the evening's discussion 
was motivation— of character and of the 
reader. A short talk on the meaning of 
the word "motivation" was given by 
Maxine Earley. Then Adam Bigler, with 
the aid of others, dramatized a revised 
version of one of his plays in which the 
author stressed the motivation of action 
in the character. 

David Yake gave a modern fast mov- 
ing sketch of married life in which "Bave" 
showed a fairly good understanding of 
the feminine heart. The story was a good 
one, and the author is to be compliment- 
ed on it. 

Following this, Lois Miller's creation 
brought the tinge of vacation, and made 
the entire party wish for the end of May 
and summer. 

Louis Straub arrived late, but righted 
his wrong by bringing a clever recapi- 
tulation of Dr. Lynch's foreword in last 
year's "Quittie." First it was written 
as Robert Ingersoll might have written 
it, then as a Biologist, and third as a 
poet. One of the highlights of the eve- 
ning was the short anecdote written by 
Henry Palatini. It was to the point and 
sudden, containing a bit of vivacity, 
tragedy, pugilism, and pathos all in one 
short theme. Then Miriam Eichner, the 
new Freshman member, entertained with 
her autobiography. It was well written 
and contained much pathos, vivacity, and 
tragedy also. 

The remainder of the evening was 
spent in general discussion of the plays 
and stories with a few flashes of wit 
from the guests as well as from the club 
members. 



ALUMNI GROUPS FOUND 
IN MANY NEW SECTIONS 



Orchestra Leader 



(Continued from Page One) 



Dr. Reed had only recently been 
awarded the Seibert Memorial Prize for 
outstanding medical work during the past 
two years. Of this prize the Harrisburg 
Patriot of November 23 says: 

"The prize, given every two V^ars to 
a member of the academy who has ex- 
celled in his profession, carries a prize 
of $500 to visit medical centers of Eu- 
rope. The $500 is the interest accrued 
every two years from a $10,000 fund 
left by the late Anna Mary Seibert, as 
a memorial to her brother, the late Dr. 
William Seibert, of Steelton. 

"Doctor Reed is a graduate of Lebanon 
Valley College and the University of 
Pennsylvania Medical College, where he 
took three years of post-graduate work 
in obstetrics and gynecology. He is a 
fellow of the American College of Sur- 
geons, a member of the Pennsylvania 
Medical Association and the American 
Medical Association. In addition to his 
work as obstetrician at the Harrisburg 
Hospital, he is also consulting obstetri- 
cian at nearby hospitals." 

Dr. Lynch as the guest of honor de- 
livered an inspiring and forceful address. 
The officers elected were Mr. J. Paul 
Hummel, 17, Hummelstown, President, 
and Miss Lillian Quigley, '91, Secretary. 

On the same day, December 9, the 
Pittsburgh Alumni met for organization. 
The call had been issued by Mr. J. I. 
Cretzinger, '21, of Library, Pa., and a 
very interesting organization meeting was 




SAM TRACY 



Philo Formal To Be 
At Hershey Ballroom 

SAM TRACY & 'ADMIRALS' 



Sixty-Seventh Anniversary 
Be Long Remembered 
Affair 



to 



The Philokosmian Literary Society will 
hold its Sixty-Seventh Anniversary 
Dance Saturday night between the hours 
8 and 12 P. M. in the ballroom of the 
Hershey Inn, Hershey. Mr. De Witt Es- 
sick, the anniversary dance chairman, is 
busy making elaborate preparations for 
the event and is confident that it will 
prove highly enjoyable to those who at- 
tend. 

The popular Sam Tracy and his broad- 
casting "Admirals" have been engaged 
to supply the music for the evening. Al- 
though the "Admirals" are well known, 
being heard regularly over the entire Co- 
lumbia network every Friday in the Har- 
risburg variety program, this will be their 
first appearance in this territory. This 
orchestra comes with a splendid reputa- 
tion. It is a favorite at Penn State, Notre 
Dame, and other colleges. Tracy and his 
band are also well-liked in the metro- 
politan centers, having played frequently 
for the "Vanity Fair" in Pittsburgh, the 
"Roseland" in New York, and other clubs 
in the larger eastern cities. This cele- 
brated group of artists should go far to- 
ward making the Philo Anniversary 
Dance an affair long to be remembered. 



L. V. BROUGHT INTO LIME- 
LIGHT BY PRESS SERVICE 



held. The Field Secretary was the prin- 
cipal speaker. An organization was ef- 
fected with the election of the following 
officers, President, John I. Cretzinger, 
Library, Pa.; Vice-President, Dr. C. C. 
Gohn, '02, Greensburg; Secretary, Miss 
Nancy Margaret Miller, Ph.D., '16, Pitts- 
burgh. Miss Miller received her Doc- 
tor's degree from the University of Pitts- 
burgh in February, 1933. After gradua- 
tion from Lebanon Valley College in 
1916, she was engaged in public school 
work, particularly at Pleasantville, New 
Jersey, and Clearfield, Pa. In 1927, she 
received the A. M. degree from the Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh. The summer of 
1929 she spent in Europe traveling and 
working in several of the European li- 
braries. Since 1930, she has been gradu- 
at eassistant in Latin at the University 
of Pittsburgh, at the same time continu- 
ing her study toward the doctorate. At 
present, she is assistant instructor of 
Greek and Latin at the same institution. 

The Pittsburgh group held a very suc- 
cessful second meeting for the year, Sat- 
urday, April 14, with President Lynch as 
the speaker. 



(Continued from Page One) 



chestra, and other college organizations; 
many individual photographs have ap- 
peared of students prominent on our 
campus. Lebanon Valley College cuts 
have appeared frequently in the photo- 
gravure sections of the Philadelphia and 
Harrisburg papers. Some of our cuts as 
well as many of our news items have 
been circulated by the Associated Press 
all over the country. Encouraging letters 
have been received from graduates and 
other friends complimenting the College 
on its publicity this year, and from news- 
paper men thanking us for our prompt 
and judicious cooperation in helping them 
to provide suitable college material for 
their readers. 

Most of these successes have been due 
to the personal efforts of Percy Clements, 
of the Class of 1933, who was appointed 
in his fourth year to organize the Press 
Service, and who during this past year 
has devoted the greater part of his time 
to it— although he is formally registered 
as a graduate student and is also giving 
Coach Mylin some assistance in the busi- 



ness management of the athletic teatn s 

Entering fresh upon the work tw 
years ago, Clements studied the field and 
soon got into shape an excellent syite n 
for gathering and circulating news, whi^ 
in itself is a prime accomplishment. IVl 0re 
than that, he has accomplished the diflfj 
cult task of winning the good will of th^ 
newspapers. At first the editorial office 
regarded our publicity with suspici 0t] . 
now their confidence in the news val Ue 
of all that emanates from the Lebano n 
Valley College Press Service is such that 
even the larger papers commonly p r j nt 
our reports in full. 

He has made a publicity service that 
puts Lebanon Valley College promi- 
nently before the public, a service that 
has more than held its own against the 
competition of well established news 
services employed by other and larger 
institutions. The Press Service has not 
only supplied the newspapers with ma- 
terials the College would like to see 
printed, but it has created a demand for 
Lebanon Valley College news. This last 
condition is due explicitly to Percy Cle- 
ments' sound journalistic instinct for good 
copy, and to his happy combination of 
modesty and dash in dealing with editor-, 
-■nd press agents 




THE THREE-MINUTE MEN 
Will March Tonight! 

Fall in tonight at 8:30 P.M. (Standard 
Time) when the Three-Minute Men go march- 
ing home. They are the boys who telephone 
the Family. A three-minute Station to Sta- 
tion call to anywhere within 100 miles costs 
only 35 cents at night. 

Fall in — enjoy a skirmish with the Home 
Folks! You can pack a whole week's news 
in a three-minute telephone chat. With the 
low Night Rates, it's a weekly custom for 
thousands of college men. Join this army of 
Three-Minute Men. 



FOLLOW iliese EASY 
>1AIU IEI\<. OltlHICS . . • 

Telephone after 8:30 P.M. Standard Time 
• 9:30 P.M. Daylight Saving Time). 

The low Night Rates apply only on Station 
to Station calls— that is, on calls for a tele- 
phone, but not for a specific person. 

Just give the Operator the number you 
want. 

Charges may be reversed. 



THE Hl l i TELEPHONE COMPANY OE PENNSYLVANIA 

M— 8 




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LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 3, 1934 



PAGE THREE 



tea ms 
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3 ii jflemotiam, 1934 

. xA nuf^ M. Lindsay. A.B., 1911. 
lb Alexander M. Lindsay was born 
' Newville, Cumberland County, 
^\ i7, 1858. He was educated in the 
Apr j ub iic schools and at Millersville 
! ° a J. Normal School. At the age of 

nty hc began his life work of teach ' 

t%VC and after ten years in the schools of 
rlberland County went to Steelton, 
p where he taught for twenty years. 

ntring his V ears in Steelton he took 
os in Mechanical Drawing and in 
fours'- 3 ... 
p ,blic School Music, graduating in musx 
Boston in 1895. For many years he 
? s supervisor of music in the Steelton 
Schools and teacher of Mechanical Draw- 
Li in the high school. 

In 1908 he was elected teacher of Me- 
chanical Drawing in the Harrisburg Tech- 
C . „1 Hiah School, in which position he 
remained until the school was abandoned 
. 1926. He then went to the John Harris 
High School, Harrisburg, resigning at 
that school during his fiftieth year of 
teaching and in his seventieth year of 

During his early years at the Harris- 
burg Technical High School, Mr. Lind- 
say began taking courses of study at 
Lebanon Valley College, receiving the 
Bachelor of Arts degree in 1911. A few 
years later he began his graduate work 
with Lehigh University, receiving the 
Master of Arts degree there in 1919. 

In 1895, Alexander Lindsay was mar- 
ried to Carrie Elizabeth Hess, then a 
teacher in the Steelton schools. One 
child, Russell Hess Lindsay, was born in 
1897. 

Alexander M. Lindsay passed away 
January 13, 1934. 



Leaves For Bucknell 



Alumni Appreciation 
Service of Hooks Mylin 



Kathryn Hagner Bixler, B.S., 1930. 

Kathryn Harriet Hagner, born Decem- 
ber 18, 1907, died February 2, 1934, at 
the Harrisburg Hospital from an attack 
of pneumonia. 

After graduation from college, Kathryn 
Hagner taught in the high school at Cres- 
sona, Pa., resigning her position when 
she married John A. Bixler, of New Cum- 
berland, Pa., in 1931. She is survived by 
her husband and a daughter, Barbara 
Ann. 



Eli Monroe Bomberger, B.S., in Ed., 
1929. 

Eli M. Bomberger passed away at the 
University of Pennsylvania Hospital in 
Philadelphia, February 12, 1934, of a 
complication of diseases. He was born 
December 19, 1904, was a resident of 
Lebanon, teaching in the schools of that 
County, and was laid to rest near the 
Heidelberg Church of the Brethren in the 
southern part of Lebanon County, where 
he and his ancestors had resided for many 
years. 



George A. Wolfe, B.S., 1881. 

George A. Wolfe, leading merchant, 
ch urchman and banker of Mount Wolf, 
die d suddenly February 14, 1934, in 
* Pittsburgh Hotel, while returning home 
•WO a church conference in Dayton, 
j- ni o. Death was caused by heart trou- 

e - He was 70 years of age. 
■ Wolf was considered one of the 
fading laymen in the United Brethren 
domination. He was financially inter- 
ste d in lumber, mill work, coal, builders' 
u Mies and wire cloth industries. 

e is survived by his widow and three 
G eorge H. Wolf, Charles B. Wolf 
nd E aHe L. Wolf, all of Mount Wolf. 

Isa 



* c P. Boughter. A.B., 1919. 
Ur t 

Pine ac Boughter, formerly of 
hisT Gr ° Ve ' ;ind at the time of his death 
Coll^ instructor in the State Teachers 
f at .! 9c at Fairmont, West Virginia, was 

struck lnJUrCd Mafch 16 ' 193 *' Whe " 
le nD C k y a truck while crossing the col- 

Mr n 

°ctob was born at 

Pine Grove, 

Pin e r 1899, graduating from the 
fr 0rn j Ve High School in 1915, and 
eban °n Valley College in 1919. 



...... 














BNBBN«88HhHBF 

"HOOKS" MYLIN 

It is with very deep regret that I am 
leaving Lebanon Valley College at the 
end of the present school year. I hope I 
do not lose active contact with the many 
friends made during the past eleven years. 

I wish continued success to the many 
boys whom I have had the pleasure o/ 
coaching while here, and thank them [or 
their cooperation, hard work, and fight; 
most times against much bigger edds. 

To my successors, I wish the best of 
luck, and hope that the teams and ath- 
letic program grow much bigger and bet- 
ter than they have ever been. 

— E. E. Mylin. 



From 1919 to 1921 he served as Princi- 
pal of the Township School at Corydon, 
Pa., leaving there to take up graduate 
work at the University of Pittsburgh 
..here he received his Master's degic 
1922. During the years 1922-1925 Mr. 
Boughter was Professor of History and 
Economics at Salem College, W. Va.; 
during 1925-1926 was a student at the 
University of Pennsylvania, working to- 
ward his Ph.D. degree; from 1926 to the 
time of his death he was Professor of 
History at the State Teachers College, 
Fairmont, W. Va. 

Dr. Boughter was the founder of the 
state collegiate debating contest in West 
Virginia and was coach of the Fairmont 
debaters. 



Rev. Russell F. Showers, General Sec- 
retary of the Home Missions and Church 
Erection Society of the United Brethren 
Church, died April 14, 1934, at the Mayo 
Sanitarium in Rochester, Minn., where he 
had undergone an operation. Mr. Show- 
ers was a former student at Lebanon Val- 
ley College. He was Superintendent of 
the Erie Conference for a period of ten 
years. 



Walter E. Waggoner, A.B., 1928. 

Rev. W. E. Waggoner was born No- 
vember 11, 1895. He was educated in 
the public schools of Enola, Pa. He en- 
tered the World War and on his dis- 
charge from the army became a Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad telegraph operator at En- 
ola. He attended the Harrisburg Acade- 
my at night and graduated there in 1923. 
In 1924 he entered Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege and during the four years of his col- 
lege course served as supply pastor at 
Mcchanicsburg and Salem Circuit of the 
United Brethren Church. Upon gradu- 
ation he was transferred to Shepherds- 
town U. B. Church, and while serving 
there completed his theological course at 
the Gettysburg Seminary. In 1932. Rev. 
Waggoner was *nt to York Second 
Church. 

Rev. Waggoner died in the York Hos- 
pital April 24, 1934. following a two 
weeks' illness with typhoid fever, He is 
survived by his widow and two small 
children. 



We, the alumni of Lebanon Valley 
College, take this opportunity of express- 
ing our appreciation of the high quality 
of service rendered by E. E. "Hooks" 
Mylin during the eleven years he served 
as athletic director and coach of our ath- 
letic teams. 

Coming to Lebanon Valley in 1923 
"Hooks" immediately set about the diffi- 
cult task of bringing our college to the 
"ront in the athletic world. Always hand- 
icapped by small squads, inadequate prac- 
tice facilities, and many other discourag- 
ing obstacles this great coach gradually 
raised the standard of our competitive 
sports. His personality and ability gained 
the confidence and admiration of other 
coaches. Lebanon Valley's schedules be- 
came more desirable. The teams he placed 
on the field could always be counted on 
to play a hard clean game and they were 
never licked. Despite the fact that Leb- 
anon Valley College was often forced to 
face competition way out of their class— 
a Mylin coached aggregation never 
stopped fighting until the final whistle 
had been blown. 

Lebanon Valley College teams, under 
Mylin's leadership, have won fame for 
their aggressiveness and deception. Op- 
ponents never knew what was coming 
next. A good illustration of the type of 
teams that were truly Mylin constructed 
may be drawn from the 1933 eleven. 
With a squad of 23 men Lebanon Val- 
ley defeated five opponents, tied two 
games, and lost two. Only once in the 
nine contests did the "Flying Dutchmen" 
hold a lead at the halftime, but when the 
games were over the crippled but game 
outfit had tasted their share of victories. 

There are many games we could men- 
tion that will always live in the memories 
of Lebanon Valley followers— not only 
in football, but basketball and baseball 
as well. Victories as well as defeats 
were characterized by good sportsman- 
ship and gentlemanlike conduct— truly, 
Mylin instilled characteristics. 

It is with regret that we acknowledge 
Coach Mylin's departure. He has done 
Lebanon Valley a great service. Our 
hats are off to a fine gentleman and 
roach. He has the best wishes of all the 
alumni for continued success in his new 
position. 

The Lebanon Valley College 
Alumni. 



COLLEGE PRESS SERVICE 
GIVES L. V. PUBLICITY 



(Continued from Page One) 



Today the situation is reversed. Pa- 
pers in this vicinity are cooperating in 
every respect to give Lebanon Valley 
College the "break" it deserves. Articles 
of all kinds have been accepted by the 
Associated Press, International News 
Service, and United Press. Photos of 
athletic teams, play casts, musical organi- 
zations, and campus leaders have ap- 
peared in the leading papers of eastern 
Pennsylvania. All of this goes to show 
that Lebanon Valley College is right- 
fully coming to the front. One of the 
biggest problems of a school-controlled 
news releasing agency is to gain the con- 
fidence and cooperation of the press. Leb- 
anon Valley College has succeeded in 
establishing that kind of a relationship. 

Alumni of Lebanon Valley College no 
longer have to hang their heads in shame 
when questioned concerning their alma 
mater. News is printed daily in an effort 
to keep Lebanon Valley College before 
the public. Now as never before news of 
our institution is in demand. It is the in- 
tention of our department to continue the 
advance and to keep a firm grip on the 
connections that have been made in the 
interest of the college and all of the peo- 
ple connected with its activities. 



Alumni Day Program 

We all have formally noted on our 
calendars June 2, as Alumni Day. Let 
nothing keep you away from your 
campus this day of days. This is the 
one day of the year that we live again 
our college days amid the scenes of 
the past. Old friends from far and 
near will be waiting eagerly to greet 
you. 

If you need further urging remem- 
ber the Annual Business Session. A 
revised Constitution will be presented 
for your action. Important in the re- 
vision are the Articles that provide 
for an Associate Alumni Membership 
as well as a change in the casting of 
ballots at Annual Meetings to pro- 
vide for the vote of alumni not able 
to be present. Other changes are of 
rqual importance and will require the 
best judgment of all of us, for our ac- 
tions on June 2 will be some of the 
most important taken in the history of 
the Association. 

After the Anual Business Session 
there will follow a round of entertain- 
ment that will make the day one long 
to be remembered. 

EVENTS OF THE DAY 
(Eastern Standard Time) 

10.00 A.M.— -Annual Business Session. 
Room 18 Ad. Bldg. 

12.30 P.M.— Luncheon, College Din- 
ing hall. All Alumni will be 
guests of the college. 
1.30 P.M.— Class Day Exercises. 

Engle Conservatory. 
2.30 P.M.— Reception to Alumni and 
friends by President and Mrs. 
C. A. Lynch at President's 
home. 

3.30 P.M.-Baseball, L. V. C. vs. 
Gettysburg. 

REPORT OF ALUMNI BANQUET 

Committee: 

Anna E. Kreider 
Gordon Starr 
Gladys Fencil 
Alumni Banquet— Golf Club House 

Public Course— Hershey 
Receptions— Six to Seven o'clock. 
Dinner— Seven o'clock, $1.50 per 
plate. 

Toastmaster*— Dr. H. M. Imboden of 

New York, Class of 1899. 
Response— Dr. Carl F. Schmidt, Uni- 
versity of Penna., Class of '14. 
Response- Dr. Thomas B. Lyter, Mil- 
waukee, Wis., Class of 1914. 
Dancing will be featured immediately 
after dinner. 
Reservations for banquet, made af- 
ter 12 o'clock noon, Alumni Day, will 
be so designated by specially pre- 
pared tickets which will not admit 
bearers to banquet hall until earlier 
•eservations have been taken care of. 

Transportation to Hershey Golf 
Club House will be furnished upon 
request to the committee before 4 
>'clock in the afternoon. 

D. K. Shroyer, President. 



ALUMNI GROUPS FORMED 
UNDER DOCTOR SHENK 



(Continued from Page One) 



Company, of West Concord, Massachu- 
setts, as President and Miss Mildred 
Christiansen of Randolf, Mass., as Secre- 
tary. The Alumni very much appreci- 
ated the courtesy of Dr. Fisher in inviting 
them to his church. A feature of the pro- 
gram was the address of Professor Roy 
J. Guyer, head coach and director of Phy- 
sical Training in the State Agricultural 
College, Storrs, Connecticut. Professor 
Guyer gave interesting reminiscenses of 
his experience as a student and as coach 
at Lebanon Valley. The Field Secretary 
brought the greetings of the College and 
the Alumni. 

An April 30. the Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege Club of Western Maryland was or- 



ganized in the United Brethren Church 
in Boonesboro, Md., Rev. Frank L. Stine, 
16, pastor, with the Rev. Dr. F. Berry 
Hummer, 05, of Hagerstown, as Presi- 
dent; Rev. DeWitt Philo Zuse, '26, Fre- 
deric, Vice-President; Miss Elizabeth 
Hook, '32, Myersville, Secretary-Trea- 
surer, and Walter V. Spessard, Esq., '09, 
Smithburg, and Mrs. Mary Wyand Co- 
blentz, '15, as member of the Executive 
Committee. Dr. Plummer presided at the 
dinner and gave a perfect example of 
the toastmaster's art. Among the older 
Alumni present were E. C. Thomas, '80, 
and B. Frank Baker, '82, both of Boones- 
boro. The reminiscenses of these early 
graduates were unusually interesting. 
Rev. Russell Oyer, '29, Myersville, led in 
the singing of college songs. One of the 
features of the evening's entertainment 
was a duet, "Song of the A. B.", by Al- 
bert Flook, '09, Myersville, and Walter 
V. Spessard, '09, Smithburg. President 
Lynch who had delivered four addresses 
including two sermons the day preceding 
and three addresses including a radio 
broadcast on that day was the principal 
speaker. He outlined briefly the policies 
of the administration and expressed deep 
appreciation of the loyal support of the 
Maryland Alumni. The Field Secretary 
spoke briefly. 

It is hoped that within the next month 
organizations will have been effected in 
Lancaster County, where a committee 
consisting of Park F. Esbenshade, '07, 
Bird-in-Hand, Rev. O. T. Ehrhart, '11, 
Lancaster, Miss Mary Musser, '10, 
Mountville, Professor Ellsworth Nitrau- 
er, '25, Mt. Joy, and Miss Marion May, 
'33, of Lititz, are formulating plans. In 
Central Pennsylvania where a meeting at 
State College and a later one at Altoona 
are in prospect; in Schuylkill County, 
where Dr. Roudabush is an outstanding 
leader; in Dayton, Ohio, where Mr. John 
B. Lyter and Miss Mary McLanachan, 
'27, are active leaders; and in California 
where Mrs. Enid Daniel Jones, '00, is as- 
sembling the group. The Alumni of Vir- 
ginia, of Washington, D. C, the Cum- 
berland Valley, Cleveland, Ohio, and 
Chicago will also no doubt organize be- 
fore the close of the year. 

The excellent work of the Philadelphia 
organization, the New York Branch, and 
the Baltimore group has been published 
in the La Vie from time to time. The 
officers of the York County organization 
are also planning activities. The Field 
Secretary is delighted with the fine re- 
sponses from Alumni in all sections and 
looks forward with confidence to a closer 
relationship between the graduates and 
their Alma Mater. 



RACQUETEERS VANQUISH 
G-BURG AND ST. JOSEPH 



(Continued from Page One) 



This week the courtsters will engage 
Dickinson and Gettysburg at home and 
Juniata at Huntingdon with a good 
chance of making it six victories in a 
row. 

Summaries of last week's matches: 

Lebanon Valley 5; Gettysburg 2. 

Donmoyer, L. V. C, defeated Achey, 
7-5, 6-2; Fink, Gettysburg, defeated Nye, 
6-2, 6-0; Walborn, L. V. C, defeated 
Dunkleberger, 6-1, 6-4; Mcllheney, Get- 
tysburg, defeated, Ax, 6-4, 5-7, 6-3; 
Shroyer, L. V. C, defeated Livingood, 
4-6, 6-4, 6-3. 

Donmoyer and Nye, L. V. C, defeated 
Achey and Fink, 6-2, 2-6, 7-5. Walborn 
and Ax, L. V. C, defeated Mcllheney 
and Brazel, 6-2, 10-8. 

Lebanon Valley 5; St. Joseph's 2. 

Kane, St. Joe, defeated Donmoyer, 7-5, 
6-4; Nye, L. V. C, defeated Mcllvaine, 
6-4, 7-5; Lehman, L. V. C, defeated Mc- 
Cormick, 6-3, 6-4; Forman, St. Joe, de- 
feated Walborn, 7-5, 6-2; Ax, L. V. C, 
defeated Gerhart, 6-0, 6-1. 

Donmoyer and Nye defeated Kane and 
McCormick, 6-3, 9-7. Lehman and Ax 
defeated Mcllvaine and Forman, 6-1, 6-4. 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 3, 1934 



NOT A MASQUERADE--THE SCOTCH HIGHLANDERS 




What and whom have we here? Fourteen Scotchmen imported from the Highlands by special Junior request. This 
group of musicians is to play at the annual Prom, Friday, May 11. Do you have the price of a ticket under cover and a 
date in mind? 

Does not Spring, the flowers, and green grass suggest the spacious Hershcy Ballroom floor-the promenade to the 
catchy rhythm of the Alma Mater and other college numbers— and the novelty numbers of a pleasing orchestra? 

Not only is this group popular among the campus dance enthusiasts, but the outstanding record of the orchestra itself 
should guarantee its satisfaction. Some of the leading successes have been the Crystal Slipper in Cleveland, Greystone Ball- 
room in Cincinnati, Roseland in New York, and the Rigadon Ballroom in Sioux City, Iowa. Other colleges, clubs, and fra- 
ternities have danced to the music of the Scotch Highlanders. Recent dates played are the Junior Prom, Hood College - 
Alpha Chi Sigma Fraternity, State College— Junior Skull Dance, Temple University -Du Pont Country Club, Wilmington- 
and the Governor s Inaugural Ball at Pierre, South Dakota. 

A youthful orchestra in kilts is certainly worth the price of the dance. Take your Scotch straight with Carl Robb, 
Harold Yeagly, and Murry Swingly -trumpets. Trombones-George Feary and Ross Jenkyn. Robert Egolf, Orville Aiken, 
and Robert Hays— saxophones. "Eddie" Huber- piano, drums— Joe Dolbeer, guitar-George Thomas, bass-Joe McGrana- 
han, feature vocalist— Le Verne Phelps, and Ty Zeigler— director. 



League Game Ends 
In L.V. Victory Over 
Juniata Indians 



J. WITTER OUTSTANDING 



Timely Hitting By L. V. Slug- 
gers Brings Success By 
Score 6 - 1 



Consistently good pitching by John 
Witter and timely hitting, bold base-run- 
ning, and good support by the whole 
Lebanon Valley nine spelt defeat for 
Juniata in a league game last Tuesday by 
the score of 6-1. 

The Lebanon Valley right-hander al- 
lowed only three well-scattered hits and 
was nicked for a lone run in the third 
inning. He struck out seven of the op- 
posing sluggers and dealt out but three 
bases on balls. He was given splendid 
support in the field. Boran, especially, 
scintillated, handling ten chances without 
an error. "Pat" Patrizio made a brilliant 
catch of Hummel's long drive in the sec- 
ond inning and Arndt broke up an eighth- 
inning rally by the Indians with a nice 
stop on Hummel's hard-hit grounder. 

Two three-run rallies accounted for the 
six Valley runs after Juniata had scored 
once in the opening half of the third. 
Nicholson's single accounted for the lone 
alien tally when Kyper dashed all the 
way from second to home to score on the 
hit. 

The first trio of L. V. runs was put to- 
gether in the home half of the third. 
Mentzer walked to open the inning and 
was forced out at second on Arndt's 
grounder. Barthold got a clean single to 
right and Patrizio was intentionally giv- 
en four straight balls to fill the bases. 
Arndt scored while Patrizio was being 
retired at the keystone sack on Rust's 
force-out. Charlie then proceeded to steal 
second and the pitcher, over-anxious to 
catch Barthold on an attempted double 
steal, overthrew third and Barthold and 
Rust scored. Boran was made the third 
out on a grounder, Kyper to Nicholson. 

Lebanon Valley's final three runs were 
scored in the sixth. With one gone, Bo- 
ran got to first on Kepler's error. Wil- 
liams drew a base on balls and moved to 
third on Whiting's single over first base 
which enabled Boran to cross the plate. 
Whiting and Williams then worked a 



perfect double steal, Williams scoring 
and Whiting moving to second. Witter 
then thrashed out the longest hit of the 
day, a long fly to right field which went 
for a triple, Whiting scoring the sixth 
and final Valley run. Matlock, opposing 
pitcher, was withdrawn at this point and 
his successor, Daher, halted the rally, 
Mentzer going down on strikes and Arndt 
retiring on an infield grounder. The box 
score: 

Lebanon Valley 

A.B. R. H. O. A. E. 

Barthold, cf 4 12 10 

Patrizio, rf 2 3 

Rust, ss 4 1 3 1 

Boran, 2b 4 1 5 5 

Whiting, If 4 12 10 

Williams, lb 3 1 10 

Witter, p 3 10 10 

Mentzer, c 2 7 

Arndt, 3b 3 10 10 

Totals 29 6 5 27 10 1 

Juniata 

A.B. R. H. O. A. E. 

Flanagan, cf 4 1 

Nicholson, lb 3 1 7 

Given, 3b 4 1 

Hummel, If 3 1 

Wareham, c 4 6 

Scott, rf, p 4 1 2 

Matlock, p 2 112 1 

Daher, p, rf 2 2 

Kepler, ss 3 2 3 1 

Kyper, 2b 2 10 12 

Shingler, 2b 1 



Susquehanna Subdued 
At L.V. Baseball Opener 

Flying Dutchmen Capitalize On 
Badgers' Wildness In 
Early Innings 



BOX SCORE 

Lebanon Valley 

A.B. R. H. O. A. E. 

Barthold, cf 3 

Patrizio, rf 1 2 

Smith, rf 1 

Rust, ss 3 112 11 

Boran, 2b 3 1 4 

Williams, lb 1 1 1 13 

Whiting, If, 3b 4 110 

Sincavage, If 

Mentzer, c 3 2 3 1 

Arndt, 3b 2 1 1 

Billett, p 2 3 1 5 

'Witter 1 



Totals 31 1 3 24 8 2 

Two base hit^Whiting. Three base 
hit^Witter. Double play— Matlock to 
Nicholson. Stolen bases— Scott, Rust, 
Whiting, Williams. Struck out— by Mat- 
lock 3; by Scott 1 ; by Daher 2; by Wit- 
ter 7. Bases on balls— off Matlock 4; 
off Witter 3. Umpire— Gallagher. 
Score by innings: 

Juniata 00100000 0—1 

Lebanon Valley 00300300 x— 6 



Totals 24 7 6 21 12 1 

* Witter batted for Arndt in 6th. 
Susquehanna 

A.B. R. H. O. A. E. 

Morrow, ss 3 1 5 

Spitzner, 2b 2 13 11 

Bastress, cf 2 2 1 

Hanna, rf 2 

Roach, rf 10 10 

Eisenhower, lb 2 4 1 

Martinec, c 3 3 

Anderson, If 3 2 

Cotton, 3b 2 

McGuire 1 

Badger, p 2 12 11 

* Frederick 1 



Totals 24 2 18 8 3 

* Frederick batted for Badger in 7th. 
2 base hit— Williams; 3 base hits— 
Spitzner; Billett. Struck out— By Badger 
3; by Billett 2. Bases on balls— Off Bad- 
ger 11; off Billet 1. Hit by pitcher— By 
Billett (Spitzner, Bastress). Wild pitch 
—Billett. Umpire— Gallagher. 
Score by innings: 

Susquehanna 0-0 

Lebanon Valley 2 1 1 2 1 x— 7 



Doutr 




Always Reliable H 



Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 



QUITTIES" HERE 



The last page of the 1934 Quitapahilla 
has been run through the presses. Edi- 
tor Palatini and Business Manager Hauck 
announce that the eagerly awaited an- 
nuals will be on the campus for distribu- 
tion on May Day. 



REV. J. A. MACKAY, Ph.D., 
COMMENCEMENT SPEAKER 

(Continued from Page One) 
o'clock, Dr. A. H. M. Stonecipher will 
deliver the baccalaureate sermon. Mon- 
day, June 4, will mark the Sixty-Fifth 
Commencement of Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege. The speaker is Rev. John A. Mac- 
kay, Ph.D., who is now Secretary of the 
Board of Foreign Missions of the Presby- 
terian Church in the United States of 
America. Commencement exercises will 
be held at 10:00 o'clock. After this week 
end, another year will have been added 
to the history of our Alma Mater. 



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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Great Scot! 



VOL. XI 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY MAY 10, 1934 



No. 5 



CLIO-PHILO PRODUCES 
PLAY BYJJASSELLA 

pR. PAUL A. W. WALLACE DIRECTING 

A Delightful Blend of Mystery and Fantasy — The Eternal Rid- 
dle of Death — McFaul Stages Remarkable Presenta- 
tion of His Role With Grazia Excellently 
Portrayed by Mildred Nye 



Nella Miller Gives 
First Recital To 
L. V. Music Lovers 



GIFTED KEYBOARD ARTIST 



By Dr. Alvin H. M. Stonecipher 
The college community was very admirably entertained on 
Friday evening, May 4, with a presentation of "Death Takes a 
Holiday" by the Philokosmian and Clionian Literary Societies 
under the direction of Dr. Paul W. Wallace. 

The play, written by Alberto Cassella and rewritten for the 
American stage by Walter Ferris, might be described as a blend 
of mystery play and fantasy. It is didactic, but so admirably 
combines art with the "moral" that it is delightfully entertaining 
as well as impressively instructive. 

The theme is, of course, the eternal* 

riddle of death. The play starts with the 
arrival of Duke Lambert and his son Cor- 
rado at their castle with guests. Father 
and son had raced in their cars on the 
way and had narrowly escaped serious 
accidents, endangered the lives of their 
guests. After discussing their obviously 
miraculous escapes, the guests retire with 
shattered nerves, leaving Duke Lambert 
alone. While he sat in the dimly lighted 
hall a horrible apparition appears and re- 
veals himself as Death, who explains 
that he has decided to take a holiday to 
escape the terrible loneliness of his lot. 
He requests that he be accepted as a guest 
for three days that he may taste for this 
brief period the experiences of mortal life. 
For this purpose he assumes the charac- 
ter of Prince Sirki, a friend of the duke 
but unknown to his family. The duke is 
to keep the secret of his guest's identity 
that the others may not fear and shun 
him. Failure to keep his promise, will re- 
sult disastrously. Since Death is on a 
holiday, no deaths will occur and no 
leaves will fall though it is October. 
Death's revelation incidentally explains 
to the duke their miraculous escape from 
the accidents. 

Death proves to be a charming, though 
rather strange guest. He participates in 
a ll the activities of the group, but pre- 
s ents a far-away, unworldly appearance 
^hicb. gives the other guests a rather un- 
comfortable feeling. Only Grazia, daugh- 
Continued on Page 4, Column 1) 



Music Festival 

Pleases Audience 



The Music Festival on April 27 was 

e climax of Conservatory activities. 

n the afternoon the orchestra rose to 

9rea t heights, as did Ruth W. Bailey 

ln Presenting Greig's Concerto in A 

ln ° r - Her poise, her interpretation, 

her skillful mastery of the ex- 

mely difficult passages were those 

0t an artist. 

e band concert was given in the 
B Veni ng with EarIj Unger and Matilda 

0n anni as soloists. The Sextette from 

Uc ia Hi r -i 
u ' ummcrmoor was given by 

tCT 8 ' Un9er> Gerber ' Roth ' Br V an ' 

^th Rader The laSt number 

i n * P r °gram, a tone picture depict- 

Vof evoluti on of Dixie, was a fa- 

g te °f the audience. 

c n 9' e Hall was filled with an ap- 

Pr f' atlVe crow d of parents, friends, 

al Ur >. eSSOr ' S ' Prospective students, and 



Pre 



J rnni. 



Program Covers Wide Range- 
From Early Composers 
To Modern 



Miss Nella Miller, "one of the most 
highly gifted of the younger generation 
of American keyboard artists," and a 
member of the college's own music fac- 
ulty, will present a master recital on 
Thursday, May 17. 

Although still very young, Miss Miller 
has a long list of victories in the mu>ic 
world. Her first claim to fame was in 
winning the National Contest, sponsored 
by the Women's Federation of Music 
Clubs, in 1923. Then she received a fel- 
lowship at the Juilliard School of Music 
in New York City. It was under the 
auspices of this school that she made her 
New York debut in Town Hall, January 
(Continued on Page 3, Column 2) 



L V. Romps to Easy 

Triumph Over 
Albright Baseballers 

THIRD STRAIGHT VICTORY 



Boran's Triple, Whiting's Slug- 
ging, Barthold's Pitching — 
Features In May Day Tangle 



Coach E. E. "Hooks" Mylin, suppos- 
edly worried over a lack of pitching ma- 
terial, uncovered a new star in the form 
of Stewart "Butch'' Barthold to surprise 
the Albright Lions with a 4-2 Valley vic- 
tory in the annual May Day fracas at 
Annville. 

In the three opening games, Lebanon 
Valley hurlers have allowed a total of 
but eight hits and the measly sum of three 
runs. Barthold allowed three of these hits 
in his first pitching effort at L. V. C, 
fanned nine, and walked three. Claude 
Felty, Lion twirler, struck out eleven and 
walked two, but was less effective with 
men on the bases than was Barthold. 
Lebanon Valley got off to a two-run 
(Continued on Page 3, Column 3) 



Hershey Ballroom 
Celebration Grounds 
Philokosmian Frolic 

SAM TRACY AND ADMIRALS 

Sixty-Seventh Anniversary In 
Hands of Essick, Lloyd, 
And Shaeffer 



Phi Lamba Sigma's formal dance on 
Saturday night, May 5, was a delightful 
conclusion to the busy anniversary week- 
end. The ballroom of the Hershey Inn, 
flaunting Philo's banners and decorated 
with gay balloons, welcomed the dan- 
cers. Sam Tracy and his Admirals pro- 
vided excellent music, playing many of 
the snappier new numbers as well as sev- 
eral Casa Loma arrangements. 

It was a true May evening— warm 
and colorful, and the lobby and porches 
just outside the ballroom were frequented 
by couples. During intermission most of 
the couples strolled in the Community 
theatre garden, which is just beginning 

to bloom. 

SUPPPORT THE JUNIORS 

Dance favors were clever black and 
gold lockets with the Philo seal in gold. 
The programs were blue, tied with gold 
cord, and engraved in gold with the 
Greek letters of the society. 

Philokosmian students, patrons, and 
alumni totaled about thirty-two couples. 
The patron guests of the dance included 
Dr. and Mrs. Wallace, Prof, and Mrs. 
Grimm, Dr. and Mrs. Richie, and Dr. and 
Mrs. Struble. 

The committee for the dance consisted 
of DeWitt Essick, chairman; Howard 
Lloyd and Kenneth Shaeffer. 



First Competitive 
Exams Installed 
At Lebanon Valley 



100 PRESENT FOR TRIAL 



Guests of College for Interesting 
and Entertaining Week- 
End 



The May Day pageant was not the 
only prominent feature of last Saturday, 
May 5. That day marked the installation 
of Lebanon Valley College's first com- 
petitive scholarship examinations. The 
whole campus was alive with the activi- 
ties of the prospective students. 

The following program constituted 
their day: 

English examination 8:00- 9:35 

History examination 9:45-10:35 

Special elective examination .10:45-12:15 
Lunch in college dining hall.. 12:45 

Inspection tour of college 1:15 

May Day pageant 2:00 

Ball game 4:00 

Many sections of this part of the coun- 
try were well represented. The following 
were the participants in the examination: 
Carl Albert, Lebanon: Angeline Alessi, 
St. Clair; James Armstrong, Chester; 
Martha Baney, Minersville; Albert Bar- 
bush, Harrisburg; Clifford Barnhart, Her- 
shey; Elizabeth Bender, Annville; Ralph 
Billett, Harrisburg; Leonard Bosak, St. 
Clair; Alfred Bowman, Fontana; Elsie 
Brackbill, Paradise; Mark Brandt. Ann- 
ville; Raymond Bucher, Myerstown; Mar- 
garet Byer, Hagerstown; Adolph Capka, 
Middletown; Jane Cassel, Penbrook; Hel- 

(Continued on Page 2, Column 4) 



MAY DAY PAGEANT 
GIVE N FOR COURT 

THE CONQUEROR, UNIQUE THEME 



No Rain to Mar Performance — Charming Queen and Lovely At- 
tendants Thrill Large Appreciative Audience — Miss Ken- 
yon and Louis Straub Give Splendid Interpretations 
of the Pagan Empress and the Conqueror 



Decorated Gym 
Scene of Reception 
MterClio-PhiloPlay 

NYE, JOHNSON WELCOME 



Contrary to Lebanon Valley tradition, May Day was held on 
the first scheduled date. No more perfect weather could have 
been wished for than that of last Saturday. The rising sun looked 
down on a campus bustling with preparations, where in a hand- 
some setting of green trees the throne was erected. 

To the already long list of glorious queens who have ruled on 
this campus another very charming and lovely one was added. 
Miss Minna WolfsKeil was led to the throne and crowned for the 
day. 

♦ First in the long procession came the 

large Lebanon Valley Band decked in re- 
gal uniforms. In actual attendance to 
the queen marched her heralds, Mitchell 
Jordan and Allan Ranck; the flower girls 
and pages; her maid of honor, Miss Gem 
Gemmill; and the ladies of the court, Miss- 
es Margaret Early, Mildred Nye, Mar- 
garet Longenecker, Margaret Kohler, 
Helen Lane, and Mary Gossard. The 
queen and her court were beautifully 
garbed. Miss WolfsKeil wore a hand- 
some dress of white lace. Miss Gemmill 
chose a sophisticated model of blue crepe. 
The gowns of the court ladies were airy 
and delicate, three were of green and 
three of a pink tint. 

When the queen and her attendants 
were settled on the dias, representatives 
of the four classes brought gifts. Algire 
McFaul brought the crown from the se- 
niors. For the junior class Howard Lloyd 
presented a scepter. The third gift was 
an image of the globe fashioned in blue 
violets— Wilbur Shank bore this from 
the sophomores. Finally, the queen re- 
ceived a footstool from Richard Smith 
representing the freshmen— this was cov- 
ered with bright yellow daisies. 

Entertainment was provided for the 
queen. First was the traditional May 
Pole dance by members of the junior class. 
With the girls dressed in brightly colored 
organdies and the brilliant hues of the 
streamers they framed a colorful and gay 
picture. 

(Continued on Page 3, Column 1) 



Todd Furnishes Rhythm For 
Many Students, Alumni, 
And Friends 



The Clio-Philo play was presented 
Friday, May 4, in Engle Hall. After the 
invocation which was delivered by Dr. 
Richie, the closing presidents of the re- 
spective societies gave their reception 
-.peeches. 

The Clio closing president, Mildred 
Nye, welcomed the audience in behalf of 
Clio, and Ray Johnson welcomed the au- 
dience for Philo and introduced the play. 

After the production a reception was 
given in the Alumni gymnasium. The 
gym was beautifully decorated in the col- 
ors of the societies which also brought in 
the school colors. 

(Continued on Page 4, Column 4) 



Tennis Flashes Rally 
Twice To Victory In 
3 Tough Struggles 

LOSE TO DICKINSON, 7 -2 



Triumph Over Indians 4-3, Cele- 
brate May Day, Defeat 
Gettysburg, 4 -3 



The flashy Lebanon Valley tennis team 
won two out of three matches last week, 
losing to the Dickinson racqueteers on 
Wednesday and then winning two match- 
es in two days by scalping the Juniata 
Indians and stopping the Gettysburg Bul- 
lets on Friday and Saturday. The Valley 
tennis artists now sport a record of five 
victories and only one defeat. 

Homer Donmoyer won three straight 
matches last week; "Hib" Nye lost three 
in a row; Fred Lehman won one and lost 
one; Dick Walborn lost three; Dick Ax 
won two out of three; and "Wib" Shroy- 
er split even in two matches. In the dou- 
bles encounters, the Donmoyer-Nye team 
was able to annex one out of three, the 
Ax- Walborn combination split even in 

(Continued on Page 4, Column 3) 



May Recitals By 
Faculty and Students 

The past month has been an un- 
usually successful one for the Con- 
servatory, and the plans for May look 
very promising. Four student recitals 
will be given, and the last recital of 
the season will be held on May 17 by 
one of the faculty members, Miss 
Nella Miller. 

Two recitals were presented this 
week. Matilda Bonanni, voice; Cathe- 
rine Deisher, organ; Margaret Early, 
piano; Russell Hatz, violin; and Rob- 
ert Scheirer, bassoon, appeared in the 
Tuesday evening recital. The second 
recital was given the following eve- 
ning when the music department pre- 
sented Ruth Buck, piano; Ethel Keller, 
organ; Sara Light, piano; Charlotte 
Stabley, voice; and the well-known 
string quartette, consisting of Martha 
Elser, Oleta Dietrick, Jane Goodyear, 
and Russell Hatz. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 10, 1934 



£a Vit Coilestemte 

ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Helen Earnest, '35 Editor-in-Chief 

George Hiltner, '35 Associate Editor 

Richard Baus, '37 Managing Editor 

David Yake, '36 Asst. Man. Editor 

RE PORTO RIAL STAFF 

Catherine Wagner, '35 
Sylvia Evelev, '36 
Louise Gillan, '36 
Lester Krone, '36 
Marian Leisey, '36 
Maxine Earley, '37 

Grace Naugle, '37 General Reporters 

Ida K. Hall, '35 Conservatory 

William Earnest, '37 Athletics 

Miriam Eichner, '37 Alumni 

Louis Straub, '37 Philokosmian 

Charles Hauck, '35 Kalozetean 

Jane Shellenberger, '36 Clionian 

Marietta Ossi, '35 Delphian 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Kenneth Sheaffer, '35. .Business Manager 
C Edward Arndt, '35. Asst. Bus. Manager 
Robert Cassel, '36. . .Circulation Manager 
Elwood Needy, '37.... Asst. Cir. Manager 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 

Single Copies 5 cents 

Subscription $1-00 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter, under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



THURSDAY, MAY 10, 1934 



AU RE VOIR! 



As the last issue of the La Vie goes 
to press— due to limited funds and a slack- 
ening of journalistic enthusiasm— we, the 
remaining college props, bid you a fond 
adios— wishing every graduate the great- 
est possible success in the near future. 
After all life is what you make it— a game 
or a grind with ups and downs for every 
individual. Some go out into the world 
with a desire to conquer— others in a 
happy-go-lucky fashion will take life as 
it is, not worrying about tomorrow and 
its troubles. Under any circumstances 
worrying should be abolished as the favo- 
rite indoor sport, and cool calculation 
should reign in its place— a realization 
of what can be done rather than a des- 
pairing "what might have been." 

Is it not with mingled feelings— joy 
and regret— that your educational stay 
in the realms of Lebanon Valley College 
comes to an end? It is difficult to realize 
that many familiar faces will not return 
at the fall opening, and many green vic- 
tims will arrive to fill their place. 

This past year in retrospect seems to 
have been an unusually brilliant one- 
numerous athletic victories, the birth of 
the "Wig and Buckle," several success- 
ful dramatic presentations, "Trial By 
Jury," a Music Festival, Mothers' Week- 
end, various delightful teas for all sexes 
and classes, and many other enjoyable 
college and extra-curricular activities. 

The last weeks of college life carry 
with them many tender memories— the 
final social events of the year, the gor- 
geous May Day parade, "Death Takes 
a Holiday," Philo Anniversary, the Ju- 
nior Prom— topped off with ten delight- 
ful days of examinations. Then the final 
triumphant baccalaureate and commence- 
ment parade. . Good luck, success, and 
au revoir. 



ALUMNI NEWS and ACTIVITIES 



SCIENCE FLASHES 



Dr. Harold B. Bender, '22, of North 
Woodbury, Conn., made a brief call on 
his mother and some of his former col- 
lege teachers on Sunday enroute from 
Washington, D. C, to Cornell Univer- 
sity on business incident to the publica- 
tion of a valuable contribution to botani- 
cal literature on the classification of the 
Fungi Imperfecti, the first volume of 
which has just been printed and is a very 
creditable piece of work. 



Mr. James H. Leathern, '32, has re- 
ceived official notice from Princeton Uni- 
versity that he has been appointed Wil- 
liam Grieg Lapham Graduate Scholar in 
Biology for the year 1934-35. Mr. Lea- 
thern is at present a research assistant in 
Biology in the University of Pittsburgh. 
Congratulations, Jim, your hard work has 
not been in vain. 



Miss Hilda Buckley, '32, and her par- 
ents of Allentown, Pa., recently contri- 
buted a rare variety of lime tree to the 
planting on the campus. The tree is 
about twelve feet tall, eighteen years old, 
thickly beset with thorns, and belongs to 
the same family as the orange, lemon, and 
cumquot. The tree is rare in that most 
of its relatives grow in warmer climate, 
and few will stand the cold winters of 
this region. The tree has been planted 
in a sheltered spot south of the Library. 



Robert L. Roudabush, '31, who since 
graduation has served as an assistant and 
technician in the department of Zoology 
at Iowa State College, from which insti- 
tution he will receive his Ph.D. in June, 
has recently presented his alma mater a 
number of microscopic slides demonstrat- 
ing his skill in this work. 



Dr. R. W. Williams, '17, a prominent 
dentist with offices at 5757 N. Fifth St., 
Philadelphia, has presented a valuable 
series of X-rays and microscopic sections 
of human dentition useful in our pre- 
medical courses. 



Prof. William C. Carl, '16, of Bay- 
onne, N. J., has contributed a number of 
interesting Zoological specimens to the 
Biological Museum. 

Lebanon Valley is deeply indebted to 
all her Alumni who by contributions ot 
this kind manifest a continued interest 
in her growth and efficiency. 



MATRIMONIAL VENTURES 



Rev. and Mrs. J. E. Keene, of Cleona, 
received word that their son, J. Calvin 
Keene, Class of 1930, and Miss Elsa 
Feichtinger were to be married in Izmir, 
Turkey, on April 20, 1934. 

Calvin Keene, after spending a year 
in graduate work at Yale, accepted a po- 
sition as teacher in the International Col- 
lege at Izmir, Turkey. He is at present 
instructor in mathematics and assistant 
librarian in the school which is for Mos- 
lem Turkish boys. It is one of the six 
colleges that comprise the Near East Col- 
lege Association with headquarters in 
New York City. 

Miss Feichtinger, a native of Linz, 
Austria, received her education in the 
schools of her home town and followed 
special work in Rothenberg, Germany. 
In 1928 she received her college degree 
from Wellesly College, Wellesly, Mass. 
Since then she has been teaching in the 
American Collegiate Institute, a school 
for Turkish girls which is under the di- 
rection of the Congregational Church 
Board of America. Miss Feichtinger is 
a linguist, speaking German, English, 
French and Turkish fluently. 

According to regulations of the Ameri- 
can and Turkish governments, Mr. Keene 
and Miss Feichtinger must first be mar- 
ried by the Izmir civil authorities in the 
presence of witnesses and of the Ameri- 
can consul, the Turkish mayor performs 
the ceremony. The American consul then 
issues a certificate which makes the mar- 
riage valid in the United States. 

At the close of the school year in June 
the couple plan to return to the United 
States. They will live in New Haven, 
Conn., and take up post-graduate work 
in Yale University. 



Miss Edna Gorski, Class of 1927, be- 
came the bride of Henry Janowski, of 
Garfield, New Jersey, on January 6, 1934. 
Miss Gorski since graduation from Leba- 
non Valley College has been teaching in 
the Garfield High School. Mr. Janowski 
is a lawyer. 



Rev. Harry M. Tobias, Class of 1933, 
and Miss Ethel Miller of Tremont, Pa., 
were married February 3, 1934. The 
ceremony was performed at the Tremont 
United Brethren Church by Rev. S. C. 
Enck, superintendent of the East Penn- 
sylvania Conference. Mr. Tobias is at 
present a student at the Evangelical 
School of Theology at Reading, Pa., and 
is serving as pastor in the United Breth- 
ren Churches at Brickerville and New- 
town. 




BEYOND CftMPUS 

Ever dream of buying a Whistler por- 
trait for three cents? Take a close look 
at the latest stamps. The American Art- 
ists' Professional League has complained 
to Postmaster General Farley that the 
United States government has taken un- 
warranted liberties with a masterpiece. 
The artists complain that the feet of 
Whistler's mother have been cut off, and 
even the footstool on which the feet rest- 
ed has been removed. They are indig- 
nant because the background of the paint- 
ing has been eliminated and a ten cent 
vase of flowers included. The Post Of- 
fice Department's answer was, "We think 
it a very fine stamp." After all, what do 
some people expect for three cents? 



And even stars can be afflicted with 
pimples! The planet Jupiter last week 
broke out with what astronomers refer to 



as a "spot." This "spot" is only 30,000 
miles long and 4,000 miles wide. A 
Franklin Institute expert explains, "May- 
he it's frozen ammonia, maybe not." 



Not much has been heard of Arabia or 
Arab chiefs for a long time, but now an 
emulator of Mahomet has arisen. Ibn 
Saud, desirous of uniting Arabia under 
one ruler, now has the greater part of the 
country under his domination. Britain, 
France, and Italy are watching this sheik 
closely, eyeing their own interests. Per- 
haps the Arabian desert is getting a little 
too warm. 



Speaking of aggressive nations, what 
about Japan? The whole world is per- 
turbed about the situation in the Far 
East. If Japan insists on being so very 
aggressive what will happen? Do all our 
treaties and conferences mean nothing? 



The federal government is giving us 
some new ideas about keeping the crook 
from our doors. In the doors of the huge 
gold vault being built just now at the 
Treasury Department are being concealed 
chemicals which will pour forth deadly 



gas if anyone tries to bore through the 
heavily reenforced portals. Adapt this 
: dea to your own castle; it's not so bad. 



We know, of course, that cats have 
nine lives, but what about "Thirteen" 
the dog of the Johns Hopkins Medical 
School? The heart of the dog was stopped 
clinically and then renewed. One of the 
doctors insists, though, that the dog is 
dead, the barks and swallows being only 
normal refiex actions. Well, is it dead or 
isn't it? The scientists will have to light 
it out and as for us — we can't even be 
sure of dying any more. 

DON'T FORGET THE PROM 



COMPETITIVE EXAMS 

INSTALLED AT L. V. C. 



(Continued from Page One] 



en Cauller, Gap; William Conway, Pine 
Grove; Vance Criswell, East Berlin; Cur- 
win Dellinger, Red Lion; Alva Dinta- 
man, Walkersville, Md.; Dwight Daugh- 
crty, Dallastown; Richard Doyle, Harris- 
burg; Walter Ehrhart, Red Lion; Herman 
Ellcnberger, Annville; Grace Frankhou- 
ser, Goodwill; Mildred Gangawer, Lititz; 
Orville Gray, Altoona; Florence Gris- 
singer, Chambersburg; John Groff, Leba- 
non; Edith Hawkins, Pine Grove; Lester 
Henninger, Paxinos; Mary Hildebrand, 
West Lawn; Marguerite Hornickel, Leb- 
anon: Gerald Hottenstein, Lebanon; Mi- 
riam House, Burkettsville; El.zabeth Ker- 
ling, Reading; Richard Kitzmiller, Ship- 
pensburg; George Knupp, Middletown. 
Ray Kapp, Red Lion; Richard Krodel, 
New Cumberland; Stuart Kutz, Cham- 
bersburg; Lawrence Levan, Reading; Lu- 
ther Long, Lebanon; John Marbarger, 
Palmyra; James McClure, Dillsburg; 
Jean McKeag, Trenton, N. J.; Harold 
Miller, Cleona; John Miller, Rebersburg; 
Rita Mosher, Mechanicsburg; Wilma Nel- 
son, Dillsburg; Roger Newcomer, Wil- 
liamsport, Md.; Margaret Paige, Harris- 
burg; Alice Preisher, Chambersburg; 
Wanda Price, Carney's Point, N. J.; 
Michael Pushcarovitch, St. Clair; Charles 
Raak. Dallastown; Robert Reiff, New 
Cumberland; Millard Ricker, Harrisburg; 
Lena Risser, Lititz; Moses Rosenberg, 
Harrisburg; Paul Schach, Reading; Stan- 
ley Schaller, Harrisburg; Gertrude Sha- 
rer, Middletown, Md.; Boyd Shaffer, 
Harrisburg; Daniel Sheetz, Dillsburg; 
Eugene Shenk, Palmyra; Clair Shillito, 
Hillsburg; Olga Slepeeky, St. Clair; Jane 
Slick, Hagerstown; Luke Snavely, Ono; 
Pauline Spangler, Campbellstown; Cal- 
vin Spitler, Lebanon; Mary Stoner, Quar- 
ryville; Raymond Troyer, Harrisburg; 
Paul Ulrich, Lebanon; Charles Wallick, 
Reading; John Walmer, Jonestown; Mi- 
riam Walters, Myersville, Md.; Ruth 
Weber, Union, N. J.; Isabelle Wiley, 
Dillsburg; Murray Zimmerman, New 
Cumberland; Violette Hoerner, Hummels- 
lown; Irvin Ruth, Jonestown; Charles 
Motter, Hummelslown: Henry Schott, 
Cornwall; Emma Smyser, Harrisburg; 
Warren Kettells, Walkersville, Md.; 
Francis Riegel. Schuylkill Haven, and 
Ruth Reed, Worrelsdorf. 




Toots— "What color is best for 
bride?" 

Sam — "I'd prefer a white one." 



"Have you any children, Mr. Jones?' 
"Yes, three daughters." 
"Do they live at home with you?" 
"No, they're not married yet." 



Schreiber— "Doesn't this dance make 
you wish for another?" 

Minna— "Yeah, but he isn't cominq 
here tonight." 



Child— "God gives us our daily bread, 
doesn't He, mamma?" 

Mother— "Yes, dear." 

Child — "And Santa Claus brings th; 
presents?" 

Mother— "Yes, dear." 

Child— "And the stork brings the ba- 
bies?" 

Mother— "Yes, dear." 

Child— "Then tell me, mamma, just 
what is the use of having papa hang 
around?" 



The ponderous judge interrupted the 
eloquent lawyer harshly: 

"All you say goes in at one ear and 
out at the other." 

"What is to prevent it?" was the re- 
tort. 



Jerry— "Where did you get those great 
big beautiful eyes?" 

Peg— "Oh, they came with my face." 



Matilda— "I've been asked to get mar- 
ried lots of times." 

Ken— Who asked you?" 
Matilda— "Mother and Father." 



The slow suitor asked: 
"Maxine, would you like to have a 
puppy?" 

"Oh, Bob," she gushed, "how delight- 
fully humble of you. Yes, dearest, I ac- 
cept." 



Prof— "Come around and dine with me 
Monday." 

Ike— "Sorry, I can't. I have an en- 
gagement Monday." 

Prof— "Well, make, it Tuesday." 

Ike— "I'm going out of town Tues- 
day." 

Prof— "How about Wednesday?" 
Ike — "Oh, damn it, I'll come Mon- 
day." 



Pat— "Aren't you going to have any 
more children, Pat? You began well, one 
a year for four years, now you haven t 
had any more for the last five years." 

Mike— "Begorra, I'm through. I saW 
in the papers that every fifth child born 
in New York is a Jew." 



WHERE you study this summer is of 

Considerable Importance 

'JHE credits you acquire this summer at New York 
University can be easily transferred to any other 
college or university. This is more unusual than per- 
haps it sounds. At the Washington Square College the 
same entrance requirements and scholastic standing are 
maintained as during the college year; instruction is 
given by the regular faculty. Few summer sessions 
operate on this high plane. Lower standards mean 
possible loss of credits. 



lish, French, Geology, Oerman. 
Government, History, Italian. 
Mathematics, Philosophy, Phy- 
sics, Psychology, Public Speak- 
ing, Sociology and Spanish. 



To the student who wishes to 
make up deficiencies or shorten 
college work, elementary and 
advanced courses, with full col- 
lege credit, are offered in Biolo- 
gy, Chemistry, Economics, Eng- 
The Summer Term is given June 26 - September 14. For detailed 
information, address 
Director of the Summer Term, Washington Square College 

New York University 



Fir 
f 



flR 



Two 
t 



105 Washington Square East 



New York, N. Y. 



1 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 10, 1934 



PAGE THREE 



final Student 
Recitals Close 
Conserv Program 



CAMPUS CONCERT 



FIRST 



fw0 -fold Purpose Is Presenta- 
1 tions — Train Performers 
And Educate Students 

The last student recitals of the season 
11 be presented this coming week. Rob- 
ert Heath, organ; Ruth Bailey, piano; 
Jielen Summy, soprano; Sara Light, or- 



a nd the violin quartette consisting of 
jjjartha Elser, Oleta Dietrick, Russell 
Hatz, a nd Harold Malsh will appear in 
t he Monday evening recital at 8 P. M. 

The following evening the final stu- 
dent recital will be presented^featuring 
gobert Heath, organ; Dale Roth, tenor; 
Martha Elser, violin; Myrle Deaven, pi- 
an0 - Henry Stiner, cornet, ?nd Charlott? 
Shenk, piano. 

These student recitals have a two-fold 
purpose—to train the performer in ap- 
pearing before an audience and tcf broad- 
en the students' knowledge of musical 
literature. The recitals have been so well 
received that the music faculty is plan- 
ning to open the season earlier next fall 
and present more recitals. 

The first annual open air campus con- 
cert will be presented by the L. V. C. 
Band on May 18, at 8:00 P. M. The 
program is a varied and interesting one, 
having been chosen by the student body. 

Sempre Fidelis Sousa 

Evolution of Dixies Lake 

Anchors Away Zimmerman 

(a) La Golandrina Serradell 

(b) Two Guitars Horlick 

(c) Down South Mydleton 

On Wisconsin Purdy 

Tannhauser Overture Wagner 

Poet, Peasant and Light Cavalrymen 

Fillmore 

American Patrol Meacham 

Stars and Stripes Forever Sousa 

Our Alma Mater. 

The two soloists will be Matilda Bon 
anni and Earl Linger. 

PROM LEADER? 



NELLA MILLER GIVES 

RECITAL TO ADMIRERS 



(Continued from Page One] 



21, 1930. Her debut was a success as 
shown by press notices. 

"One of the best new American pian- 
ists heard in some time. — New York Sun. 

"The young Oklahoma pianist made 
one of the most promising debuts of the 
season, exhibiting a talent worth taking 
seriously and following with interest." — 
New York Herald Tribune. 

"An unusually gifted young pianist- 
ability that should take her to the top 




Nella Miller 

reaches of her profession. 
American. 



L. V. ROMPS TO EASY 
VICTORY OVER ALBftlGHT 



[Continued from Page One) 



York 



MAY DAY PAGEANT 
GIVEN FOR 



COURT 



(Continued from Page One) 



The story of the pageant which fol- 
lowed centered about the throne of a pa- 
gan princess. For her entertainment this 
Pagan had commanded the barbarian cap- 
tive s to fight to the death. The victor 
w as to be proclaimed the conqueror, giv- 
e " his freedom, and the choice of the 
slave girls. Yet, the empress, watching 
intense interest the struggle of the 

ar "arians, became enamoured of the vic- 
|° r and decided to offer herself and her 

r one to the Conqueror. This great fa- 
v ° r he disdainfully refused insisting that 

e Proclaimed reward for which he had 
0u ght be granted him. The empress was 
J r aged at being spurned and jealous of 

er favorite slave girl whom the Con- 

frc> er0r cnoser1, snatcne d a dagger 

* m a guard, and before the horrified 
°^ rt slayed the Conqueror. 

Was an intriguing story and well pre- 

Port r d ' M ' SS Mildred Kenyon splendidly 
^ a Yed the empress. The part of the 

Esten Ueror was won by Louis Straub- 

e Delgado was the slave favorite. 
IW lar 9 a ret Brace also was a promi- 
nt slave. 

c apti° Ceedin9 the fiflht of the barbarian 
Was t f 8 WerC dances of the a thletes; first 
th e arc ^ cnariot ra ce, then the dance of 
W ere ers ' an d the javelin dance. These 
of the enacted by girls of the school. All 
Ch ar [ e dances wer e coached by Professor 

Th ^^ aar of Harrisburg. 
de Ser *. ^ May Day Committee is well 
c eiv ec j 9 °^ tne P r ofuse compliments re- 
to p^. s Much individual credit is owing 
at M tQ S ^ ^ ena Cockshott, the chairman, 
t 

° r th eir profitable efforts. 



"Should be eventually able to claim the 
sky as her artistic limit."— New York 
Telegraph. 

In 1931 she repeated her success in 
Town Hall. Thert followed concert work 
throughout the United States. Later she 
became instructor in piano, Juilliard 
Graduate School of Music and also did 
private teaching in New York City. In 
1933 she gave eight New York concerts 
in complete cycles of Brahm's Chamber 
Music, and then joined L. V.'s Conserva- 
tory faculty. This year, Miss Miller was 
made a faculty member of Layman's mu- 

READY FOR THE PROM? 

sic course, organized by one of her for- 
mer teachers, Olga Samaroff, in Phila- 
delphia, received her degree at Columbia 
University, and continued private teach- 
ing in New York City. 

Her program covers a wide span— go- 
ing from the early composers to the mod- 
ern. 

I Siciliona— an old dance tune, arranged 

by Resphigi 

II Two Sonatas Scarlotti 

(a) E major 

(b) G major 

III Sonata in F minor Brahms 

(a) Allegro Maestoso 

(b) Andante 

"Now gleams in the gloaming the 
pale moonlight, and there two lov- 
ing hearts unite, in ecstasy bound 
together." 

( c ) Scherzo 

(d) Intermezzo — Retrospect of 2nd 
movement 

(e) Finale 

Intermission— 10 minutes 

IV (a) Vogel als Prophet Schumann 

(b) An Important Event Schumann 

( c ) Traismerie Schuman 

"Scenes of childhood." 

V Moment Musicalo in F minor.. Schubert 

VI Alborado del gracioso Ravel 

VII La Soiree dans Grenade.. . Debussy 

Poissons d'or Debussy 



iead in the first inning on Williams' sin- 
gle, Boran's beautiful drive to deep right 
which went for a three-bagger, and "Sul- 
ly" Whiting's one-base blow. 

The Flying Dutchmen added two more 
runs to their total before Albright scored, 
tallying a marker in the fourth on Whit- 
ing's double and Barney Mentzer's single, 
and being donated their final run in the 
Xt'th when two Lion errors permitted Wil- 
liams to get around the sacks. 

After the fifth the Valley sluggers were 
helpless, only one man reaching first base 
in the last three innings. "Smoky" Rust 
drew a base on balls in the seventh, but 
died on base when Boran fanned to be- 
come the third out of the inning. 

"Butch" Barthold experienced little dif- 
nculty in setting down the Albright bats- 
men in the first two innings, fanning the 
side in the second frame. In the third, 
however, two errors by the Valley infield 
and Felty's single filled the bases with 
only one gone. "Butch" bore down in 
this crisis, fanning De Franco and forcing 
Hino to pop to Smith in short center field. 

A nice stop by "Dutch" Arndt on Fel- 
ty's hard-hit liner prevented any serious 
trouble in the fourth. In the seventh the 
Lions went down on four pitched balls in 
less time than it takes to tell it. Shipe hit 
Barthold's first pitch to Arndt and was 
out at first. Felty also hit the first ball 
pitched and was retired, Rust to Williams. 
Hepler watched a wide one go past and 
then bounced to Arndt. 

The gentlemen of the opposition finally 
dented the scoring rubber in the eighth, 
when De Franco walked and Hino clout- 
ed a two-base hit. Two were down, how- 
ever, and Oslislo fanned to end the rally. 
In the ninth a terrific poke to center field 
by Shipe, Lion left-fielder, was stretched 
into a home run when the Valley outer 
gardeners were a little slow in fielding the 
ball. No harm came of the temporary 
lapse, for Haldeman had fanned to open 
the inning and Felty and Hepler were 
easy outs on high flies. Thus, the final 
figures indicated a glorious 4-2 Lebanon 
Valley triumph. 

Box score: 

Lebanon Valley 

AB. R. H. O. 

Patrizio, rf 4 

Williams, lb 4 

Rust, ss 3 

Boran, 2b 4 

Whiting, If L 4 



Witter, p, rf 5 2 2 

Smith, rf 3 10 10 

Mentzer, c 4 2 10 

Arndt, 3b 4 10 11 

Patrizio, rf, If 1 

Totals 38 6 10 27 13 2 

BUCKNELL 

AB. R. H. O. A. E. 

Kielb, rf 2 3 

Weiss, rf 1 1 

Sitarsky, cf 5 1 3 

Reznichak, 3b 5 2 3 3 2 

Dobie, ss 5 12 11 

Lauerman, c 4 8 1 

Rhubright, p 3 10 10 

Peters, lb 4 2 3 8 1 

Bean, 2b 4 113 1 

Saib, If 2 

Berly, If 2 

Totals 37 7 10 27 8 2 

Score by innings: 
Bucknell 00000041 2-7 



Lebanon Valley 02300010 0— 



Two base hits— Barthold, Mentzer. 
Three base hits— Peters, 2; Whiting, Rez- 
nichak, Dobie. Home run*— Witter. Dou- 
ble plays— Rust, Boran to Williams; Bo- 
ran, Rust to Williams. Struck out^by 
Witter 9; by Rhubright 8; by Barthold, 1. 
Bases on balls— off Witter 2; off Rhu- 
bright 4. Umpire— Gallagher. 



Eastern Pennsylvania Collegiate 
Baseball League 

Games Played to Date 

Saturday, April 21 
Bucknell 9 Drexel 8 

Wednesday, April 25 
Gettysburg 4 Juniata 3 

Friday, April 27 
Lebanon Valley-Ursinus, rain 

Saturday, April 28 
Albright 10 Bucknell 9 

Tuesday, May 1 
Lebanon Valley 6 Juniata 1 

Friday, May 4 
Gettysburg-Ursinus, rain 

Saturday, May 5 
Juniata 14 Bucknell 13 
Gettysburg 4 Drexel 2 

Tuesday, May 8 
Bucknell 7 Lebanon Valley 6 
Standings to and including 

Tuesday, May 8 

Won Lost Pet. 

Gettysburg 2 1.000 

Albright 1 1.000 

Lebanon Valley 1 1 .500 

Bucknell 2 2 .500 

Juniata 1 2 .333 

Ursinus .000 

Drexel 2 .000 



.38? 



f 




A. E. 



Barthold, p 
Smith, cf .. 
Mentzer, c 
Arndt, 3b .. 



12 

4 



Totals 32 4 5 27 13 4 

Albright 

AB. R. H. O. A. E. 



c o-worker, Mr. Warren Ment- 



Ul'ITTIK STAFF ADDITION 



The editor of the 1936 Quittapa- 
hilla announces the addition of three 
more members to the staff. The new 
members are: Winona Schroff and 
Adam Bigler, typists, and Lester 
Krone, editorial staff. 



Woods, cf '. 4 

Fittipaldi, 2b 3 

De Franco, 3b 3 1 

Hino, ss 4 1 

Oslislo, rf 4 

Haldeman, lb 3 

Shipe, If 4 1 1 

Felty, p 4 1 

Scholl. c 2 

Hepler, c 2 



Totals 33 2 3 24 9 2 

Score by innings: 

12345678 9- T 

Albright 00000001 1—2 

Lebanon Valley 2001 1000 x- 4 

Two base hits— Whiting, Hino. Three 
base hit— Boran. Home run— Shipe. Stol 
en bases— Arndt, Hino. Struck out— by 
Barthold 9; by Felty 11. Bases on balls- 
off Barthold, 3; off Felty, 2. Umpire- 
Gallagher. 

Lebanon Valley 

AB. R. H. O. A. E. 



Barthold, 
Williams, 

Rust, ss 

Boran, 2b 
Whiting, If 



f. P 
lb . 



O. 
1 

11 

2 



IN PARTING — 

To The Ciass of '34 

You have studied together . . . borrowed each 
other's clothes . . . shared four full years of 
work and play. And now, in parting, you hold 
high hopes of friendship continued in the 
years to come. 

So it will be — if you make the effort. The 
barrier of miles and business obligations 
need make no difference to friendships to- 
day. By telephone you can always keep in 
touch. It's easy to arrange week-end reunions. 



NOW — 

2 YOU SAY GOOD-BYE 



Make a list of your friends' home telephone 
numbers. 

Then, when you telephone, just give the 
Operator the name of the town and number 
desired. That's how an inexpensive Station 
to Station call is made. 

The cost is low- particularly after 8:30 
P. M. Standard Time, when the Night Rates 
offer reductions of as much as 40%. To 
call 100 miles away then costs only 35 cents. 
Take advantage of this night-time saving. 



THE BKLL TELEPHONE COMPANY OF PENNSYLVANIA 




M — 9 



1 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 10, 1934 



ANNOUNCING THE PROM ! ! 




□ 

JOIN THE RUSH 




TO THE HERSHEY BALLROOM 

□ 

FRIDAY AT EIGHT 

A SCOTCH ORCHESTRA 
FOR A SCOTCH PRICE 
S2.00 PER COUPLE 



CLIO-PHILO PRODUCES 

PLAY BY CASSELLA 



(Continued from Page One) 



ter of Princess San Luca and fiancee of 
Corrado, has no sense of fear of him. 
She is a meditative, dreamy girl and 
through her intuitive, psychic qualities 
perceives Death's true nature and is un- 
afraid. 

Meanwhile the others become so dis- 
turbed over the presence of the mysteri- 
ous guest and the evidently growing at- 
tachment between him and Grazia that 
they press the duke for an explanation of 
his character and presence. Frantic over 
the situation the duke tells the secret, and 
all are horrified. 

Midnight of Death's third holiday is 
approaching. He has gone to the garden 
with Grazia, determined to taste the 
sweets of love to complete his human ex- 
perience before he must depart. The fam- 
ily and guests are distraught and helpless. 
Death's secret has been revealed, and he 
will take one of the company as penalty 
for the betrayal. All fear that Grazia is 
the one to be taken. 

Death returns from the garden and 
chides his host for the betrayal of his 
confidence. They beg him not to take 
Grazia, and the duke offers his own life 
or his son's. Then Death reveals that he 
had at first thought of his love for Grazia 
only as a mortal experiment, but now 
finds that love is stronger than Death, 
and that he is "caught in his own net." 
He further indicates his intention of tak- 
ing Grazia. She enters in answer to his 
silent summons. She shows her devotion 
to him and disregards the others. She 
declares her intention of going with her 



lover. Death chivalrously offers her the 
privilege of staying if she is afraid to go, 
but she insists that she is ready to follow 
him. The hour of midnight is almost ready 
to strike, and Death lays aside his role as 
Prince Sirki and puts on the black robe 
and horrible mask of Death. Grazia is 
still unafraid and says, "I have always 
seen you like that." And in answer to his 
surprise she says, "You seem beautiful 
to me." Then as the chimes proclaim the 
midnight hour he wraps her in the folds 
of his black robe and disappears with the 
words, "Then there is a love which casts 
out fear, and I have found it. And love 
is greater than illusion and as strong as 
death." 

The role of Death was played by 
Harry McFaul, whose work approached 
the professional level. His quiet dignity, 
his voice, the far-away look, and his fa- 
cial expression well modified to suit vary- 
ing moods portrayed the character of his 
part most effectively. 

The part of Grazia was very admirably 
taken by Mildred Nye. She excellently 
portrayed the character of the dreamy girl 
absorbed in meditation and belonging al- 
ready more to the other world to which 
she was about to go than to this. Move- 
ment, voice, eyes, and facial expression 
were well under control and made to 
serve the moods of her role. 



Ray Johnson did an excellent piece of 
work as Baron Cesares, the superannu- 
ated statesman, fast liver, and lover. His 
erratic role so well played tended to re- 
lieve the almost tragic strain of all the 
acts. 

The parts of Duke Lambert and Duch- 
ess. Stephanie, the host and hostess, were 
played by DeWitt Essjck and Anne Ma- 
tula, the quality of whose acting contri- 
buted much to the success of the play. 

The character of Princess San Luca, 
the mother of Grazia, was excellently 
portrayed by Miriam Book. The sorrow 
and anxiety of the mother rendered the 
role rather difficult, but it was done very 
creditably. 

Allan Ranck as Corrado, son of Duke 
Lambert and fiance of Grazis, measured 
up well to the part. 

The parts of Alda, Rhoda Fenton, Erie 
Menton, and Major Whiteread, guests of 
the duke, were taken by Sarah McAdam, 
Louise Gillan, Clyde Mentzer and George 
Hiltner respectively, while Cora and Fe- 
dele, servants in the palace, were repre- 
sented by Charlotte Weirick and Allen 
Steffy. 

The college community is greatly in- 
debted to Dr. Wallace for his capable 
work as director. His discrimination in 
choosing the cast, each member of which 
was so admirably adapted to his role, 
contributed much to the success of the 
play, while the performance as a whole 
gave abundant evidence of painstaking 
and skillful directing. 



TENNIS FLASHES GET 

TWO OUT OF THREE 



(Continued from Page One) 



two matches, Ax and Shroyer were vic- 
torious in their one opportunity, and Leh- 
man and Shroyer lost in their love pair- 
ing. 

The Dickinson tennis stars were forced 
to the limit to beat the Dutchmen, most 
of the matches being carried to three sets 
and many of the sets going overtime. 
Donmoyer, L. V. No. 1, defeated Hine- 
baugh, 7-5, 6-4. Rosenberg, Dickinson, 
was forced to three sets to beat "Hib" 
Nye, 4-6, 6-2, 8-6. Freddie Lehman lost 
to Steele, Dickinson No. 3 man, 6-1, 8-6. 
Grover found Walborn a tough custo- 
mer, but finally emerged victorious by a 
6-3, 5-7, 10-8 count. Ax lost to Harris, 
6-3, 6-0. Shroyer scored the second Val- 
ley point by defeating Ringer, 6-1, 4-6, 
6-1. The doubles encounters were all 
three set affairs, with Dickinson annexing 
the three of them to win the match, 7-2. 
Donmoyer and Nye lost to Hinebaugh 
and Rosenberg, 6-4, 3-6, 6-3. Ax and 
Walborn were beaten by Steele and 
Groves, 5-7, 6-2, 6-3. Lehman and Shroy- 
er lost to Harris and Ringer, 6-4, 2-6, 6-4. 

At Huntingdon on Friday, with the 
score three matches apiece, Ax and Wal- 
born went to work in their doubles to win 
handily and give L. V. C. the match by 
the narrow margin of one point, 4-3. 

On May Day the Gettysburg racquet 
wielders, who had previously been van- 
quished 5-2 surprised the Dutchmen and 



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tied the match at three-all when the No. 
1 Bullet doubles team defeated Donmoy- 
er and Nye. This time Ax teamed with 
Shroyer in the deciding struggle and the 
Valley combination worked smoothly to 
win 6-3. 6-1, giving the racqueteers their 
second victory in as many days by the 
score of four matches to three. 
Summaries: 

Donmoyer, L. V. C, defeated Achey, 
G-burg, 4-6, 6-1, 6-3. Nye, L. V. C, lost 
to Mcllheney, G-burg, 6-1, 6-8, 6-0. Wal- 
born, L. V. C, lost to Dunkelberger, 
G-burg. 4-6, 6-3. 6-2. Ax, L. V. C, de- 
feated Livingood, G-burg, 7-5, 1-6, 6-2. 
Lehman, L. V. C, defeated Fink, G-burg, 
4-6, 6-3, 7-5. Donmoyer and Nye lost to 
Achey and Mcllheney, 10-8, 6-2. Ax 
and Shroyer defeated Smith and Uhrich, 
6-3. 6-1. 

GOING TO THE PROM? 



Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 



GYM SCENE OF RECEPTION 
AFTER CLIO PHILO PLAY 



(Continued from Page One) 



Jack Todd's "College Ramblers" fur- 
nished the music, and while the couples 
enjoyed the rhythmic strains the staff of 
next year's "Quittie" was busy taking pic- 
tures of the crowd for the next edition. 

Many Alumni who had returned for 
May Day were present. Though the floor 
was not in such excellent condition, the 
Tiusic and the refreshments compensated 
for tha't defect. 

The chaperones were Dr. and Mrs. 
Wagner, Prof, and Mrs. Carmean, Prof, 
and Mrs. Rutledge, and Dr. and Mrs. 
Richie. 

The reception began immediately after 
the play and lasted until 12:00 o'clock at 
which time the guests departed thorough- 
ly well pleased with the evening's enter- 
tainment. 



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